Archive for February 2017

Monthly Archive

Perhaps The Most Marvelous Time To Be A Parent

This week I awoke to realize this may be a marvelous time to be a parent. I mean this time, the one where political divisions run rampant, where protests and rallies have become the norm, where known science is questioned, and where we seem to be facing threats to our inequalities and our justice head on.

My boys have their eyes wide open.

Early Thursday morning I flew home from a speaking event in Oregon. I was a little bit exhausted and only had about 15 minutes to swing through my house prior to heading to the hospital for some meetings and an afternoon of podcasting. When I walked into the kitchen I found a little tube waiting for me on the kitchen counter. Our poster had arrived! Thrill coursed through me as I uncurled it and ran to the front yard.

It’s the sign you see here now gracing our front yard. It’s the sign I picked out with my boys a couple weeks ago online after a friend shared the one she’d put up. It’s the one the boys and I selected because of the poetry we felt it held, but also the power that lifted from it. In this house we have no interest in hiding how we feel. The boys have watched the pink hats get knit, the signs being painted, and the work to continue to protect our neighbors, friends, immigrants, and family of the United States that we hold so dear.

And so it was not just the platter of ideas that embody respect, liberty, and truths on this little sign that I got excited about it. It’s my boys own insight that unfolded Thursday — without me — that has me sharing here. Their pledge to the world, too.

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Make A Customized Allergy Emergency Plan For Your Child

Let’s make things easier for children with life-threatening allergies. How we communicate what a child needs matters and can be essential to protect their safety but also reduce stress and anxiety for parents who worry. This week, experts in allergy and immunology at The American Academy of Pediatrics did us a favor and sorted through various allergy emergency plans living online and in doctors’ offices. Through experience with years of research on asthma action plans, the team created a Clinical Report that showcases a single, comprehensive and universal emergency plan to help ensure that parents and caregivers are ready to manage a life-threatening reaction called anaphylaxis. If you have a child or care for a child with food allergies, allergies to insects or a known risk for anaphylaxis, print one out, put it on the fridge and make sure your child’s school has it on file! The goal is to start having all families use the same form so schools, communities, sports teams and parents everywhere all get familiar.

 What Is Anaphylaxis?

  • Anaphylaxis is a potentially life-threatening, severe allergic reaction. I like how Food Allergy Research & Education defines it: “During anaphylaxis, allergic symptoms can affect several areas of the body and may threaten breathing and blood circulation. Food allergy is the most common cause of anaphylaxis, although several other allergens – insect stings, medications, or latex – are other potential triggers”.
  • Typically, children or adults with anaphylaxis have symptoms include itchy skin, hives, shortness of breath, swelling of lips/tongue, or wheezing. Some children vomit soon after eating a food they react to and some children get diarrhea.
  • Epinephrine should be given right away, in the thigh. If you ever feel you might need it, use it. Then call 911.

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5 Things To Stop Worrying About

It’s a hard time to be a human in the United States. We’re all so worried right now as the universe seems to spin every day and the divisions among us seem to project on every wall. Yesterday I escaped the city, the news cycle, and dread by sledding with my boys in the mountains. Those outdoor be-without-a-ceiling interludes help, but the reality is Sunday morning just arrived and the newspaper is sitting on the front porch. To open it?

The hesitancy to even open the newspaper brings me to an essential truth: most of us are doing a wonderful job raising our children and what is in front of us is precious and safe. Most of us have inner critics that knock us down every day and criticize how we’re doing. But most of us can stop worrying about things so much at home. We really can and should chill out and enjoy this.

Looking to shorten your to-do list, maybe sleep better and reduce anxiety? I’ve shared 5 things I think we as parents can STOP worrying about in the latest podcast. It’s just me talking in this one (no experts join) and even so, I like this podcast. In a world where were are inundated with competition, guilt, data, and comparisons, take these ideas and feel better about the (likely) most wonderful job you’re doing raising your children.

Also, you should know I’m recording, “5 Things To Perfect As A Parent” this week as I feel we all need reminders of how much we have already mastered. We have to frame-shift and realize how great things really are while raising children amid these spins and unease. Read full post »

If You Worry Your Child Is Depressed

Depression is far more common in teens than in young children, but I often hear families wondering how to know if they should worry about their child’s mood. As many as 1 in 5 teens can have a depressed episode so concerns about depression are a common challenge. Many of us wonder if young kids get depressed (yes, but not too often), what are the signs (detailed below), and what to do about it (6 tips below). It’s scary for every parent who thinks a child is depressed. It can be terrifying to worry about a teen. There is a certain innocence we reserve for childhood and no question for some, depression can seem antithetic to that. Depression can be very real, influenced by life events, inherited, and wildly disruptive. But there is great research to help guide what we do to support children, teens, and our families if depression becomes a challenge.

I talked with clinical psychologist and depression expert at Seattle Children’s Hospital, Dr. Gretchen Gudmundsen on this 20-minute podcast. I learned a lot as we covered the definitions of depression, which children are at risk for depression, classic depression symptoms, and when parents should seek help for their depressed child.

You can listen to the podcast right here on the blog, or you can listen while you’re commuting on your phone by going to iTunes (search “Seattle Mama Doc”) or Google Play or on Soundcloud. A quick summary of high-level points below:

What Is Depression In Children and Teens:

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New Tobacco Legislation: No Cigs To Those Under 21

Last week I had the distinct pleasure of working with Washington State Secretary of Health, Dr. John Wiesman on spreading the message and intent about Washington House Bill #1054. This bill aims to raise the age to purchase tobacco and vaping products from 18 to 21 years. Dr. Wiesman believes it is the single most important policy the legislature could adopt to protect the health of our kids and the health in Washington State. That’s quite a statement.

The reason for the suggested bill and increase in age for purchasing tobacco (including e-cigs, vapes, traditional cigarettes) is to prevent access to a curious, young, and vulnerable population. Most teens say they try e-cigs and cigarettes out of curiosity. And we know 90% of adult smokers get addicted before they turn into adults. As detailed in this post, Teens Using E-Cigarettes, use of e-cigarettes rose 900% between 2011 and 2015 as they have infiltrated middle and high school students’ environment. Most teens get tobacco and e-cigs from older teens. The Surgeon General even published a big report because of concerns for increasing addiction and use of tobacco products in children and teens and what it means for our country’s risks and our country’s health.

  • In Washington, 75% of 10th graders who used cigarettes in the past 30 days received them through social sources, especially older friends.
  • About 95% of adult tobacco users started using before they turned 21 years of age.
  • As I understand it, this proposed legislation isn’t about being a “nanny” state, it’s about the welfare and health of our teens into adulthood. It’s about access to tobacco products for our most vulnerable. The brain continues to develop until age 25 years and nicotine gets in the way.

Also, the money matters. Each year, smoking-related illness costs Washingtonians $2.8 billion (Billion with a B) equating to more than $800 per household in taxes. This affects us all –$800 annually — per household goes to taxes to help deal with the effects of smoking! I think we could think of  a lot better ways to spend tax payer dollars. Read full post »

Teens Using E-Cigarettes Up 900%

We know more about e-cigarettes and teens than ever before. Recently, Dr. Vivek Murthy, US Surgeon General released a report on teens and young adults who use e-cigarettes. Perhaps one of the more staggering statistics in the report states that e-cig use has increased 900% in high school students from 2011-2015. That’s a jump. Especially concerning right on the heels of progressive data that teens were smoking less traditional cigarettes than ever before.

E-cigarettes are devices that create an aerosol (vapor) by using a battery to heat up liquid that usually contains nicotine, flavorings, and other additives. There are more chemicals in the solution than just nicotine and some contain heavy metals. Teens inhale this aerosol deep into their lungs where the nicotine and chemicals enters the blood stream. E-cigarettes can also be used to deliver other drugs like marijuana.

Reality is, the introduction of e-cigs has changed teen exposure to nicotine in a remarkable way, remarkably quickly. Nearly 1 in 5 high school students here in WA reports they have used an e-cigarette in the last month. E-cigs and e-hookahs originally entered the market unrestricted. Advertisements and celebrity endorsements arrived rapidly. And the price point of e-cigarettes kept them in reach for curious teens, as the price falls research finds, experimentation increases. Adoption of e-cigs came quickly extending down to middle school students.

These products are now the most commonly used form of tobacco among youth in the United States, surpassing conventional tobacco products, including cigarettes, cigars, chewing tobacco and hookahs. I think most people think your brain stops developing when you’re 5 or something, and certainly there’s a huge amount of development in the first couple of years in life, but we know that adolescent brains are actually very significant in development, and nicotine is a neurotoxin, and we know that it can cause lifelong problems for kids, including mental health problems, behavioral problems and actual changes in brain structure.” ~Dr. Vivek Murthy, US Surgeon General

Teens report using e-cigs primarily because of curiosity but also the fallacy that they don’t carry health risks.

Highlights From US Surgeon General Report On E-Cigs:

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