Archive for February 2018

Monthly Archive

What’s The Right Age For A Smartphone?

What’s the right age to get your child a cell or a smartphone? I wish I had a concrete, data-driven, definitive answer for you. I think the answer is a balance between what’s right for your family and when you think your child is responsible enough to manage the risk that comes with opening up an entire new world online and the risk that comes with losing something expensive. Research from Pew Research Center out this month (Feb 2018) finds that when it comes to adults, nearly all of us (95%) have a cell phone and 77% of us have a smartphone. But when it comes to parents specifically, we’re different– we’re all in it seems, 95% of parents with children under age 8 have a smartphone (not just a cell).  What we’re modeling in our own lives with our phones makes this even harder. If we are addicted to our phones what does it mean for our child? When it comes to having a child get a cell or smartphone of their own, Techcrunch reported in 2016 that children, on average, get a cellphone in the US at age 10.3 years. You may have strong reactions to that number.

The biggest reality IMO is that the biggest issue may not be the age of initiation for a phone or device but rather how we help our children use it, follow rules, and sincerely work to avoid “addiction” to it in life. We just don’t want to have our children (or ourselves!) pulled away from life in meaningful ways…this being alive thing is just too precious.

Half of teens feel addicted to their mobile devices, and the majority of parents (60%) feel their kids are addicted, according to a 2016 Common Sense report on tech addiction. A recent study (somewhat contested) of eighth-graders by Jean Twenge, author of iGen, found that heavy users are 56% more likely to say they are unhappy; 27% more likely to be depressed; and 35% more likely to have a risk factor for suicide.

Common Sense Media launched a new campaign to protect young minds from the potential of digital manipulation and addiction. The campaign, called Truth About Tech, aims not just to help us as parents but also to influence the tech industry in making products less intrusive and less addictive.

In my family, I’ve told my boys we can talk about a cell phone at age 12. But we do let them use an iPod and an iPad and holy moly, it’s not easy….nor perfectly executed. When and how you introduce devices to your children will always be a personal decision — for you and your family — and it will always demand your longstanding attention and follow-along. The good news in the overwhelm, you can always change up the rules as you go, especially if the ones you make aren’t followed! The AAP Family Media Plan is a great tool to start the conversation together as a family and allows you to print it out and put it up in the house as an easy reminder of what was agreed upon.

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From The Mouths Of Babes: Read This Twitter Thread

I can’t stop thinking about this tweet thread. I think it may be one of the most precious threads on Twitter. Hopefully that’s saying something since I’ve been plugging along, almost daily, on Twitter since 2009.

Here’s my experience with it…I’m sure you have your own and I’d love to hear about it in the comments if you’d be willing to share:

Yesterday, I woke early with insomnia around 4am-something in the morning. Instead of doing what I should have, I grabbed my phone and found myself on Twitter. Just before 5am I read a beautiful series of tweets from a South African pediatrician who cares for children at the end of life. He’d taken to Twitter in the early morning hours (Seattle time) to share messages from children at the end of life. Distillation of what they enjoyed most. Things they knew. Worries, gratitudes, and love housed within them. Innocent and nearly angelic.

I read it. I cried. I re-read it. I sent it to a few people I love. For some reason I didn’t retweet it. I have no idea why except that I think I held it so dear I wasn’t even sure what to say. I plopped it into a blog post from 2 days ago, I sent it to some smart researchers who work with children and teens and think/study/intervene on ways to improve resilience, happiness, and stress.

A perspective from the front-line-end-line-solid-lines-of-meaning in being alive is an ever-relevant and precious gift. Hard to think of any other advice that matters more. When I read the tweet thread in the early morning hours it had something like 100 likes on it. There are now, as I type this, about 100,000. That’s a lot; clearly I’m not alone in meaning-making with this. Read full post »

Is It The Flu Or A Cold?

First off, in my mind, the goal this winter for your children, and your family, and your community isn’t perfect attendance at school or work. In fact, I’d suggest schools and families and principals who currently celebrate and reward perfect attendance may provide a disservice, especially when having a flu season like we are. The goal isn’t presentee-ism — the goal is thoughtful living. Staying home when ill, staying away from those who are vulnerable when you have cold symptoms (infants, pregnant moms, elderly), and taking care of yourself is a service to YOU but also to us all.

How To Protect Your Child From This Dangerous Flu ~ Summary from Consumer Reports

It may be hard to know when your child is having a run-of-the-mill “cold” and when they are having flu. So err on the side of caution — your child has a cough/cold/runny nose/sneezing/fever? Keep them home, please during this widespread flu! More on how to help decide what is going on (flu versus cold) in the CDC chart included below.

Doing my best to continue sharing what I’ve learned about this year’s flu season. Both the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Washington State Department of Health are reporting most recent data (info has been updated as of Friday afternoon February 2, 2018) that flu rates rose again last week in the most recent data collected. Here’s the CDC data for the most recent week:

  • WA Department of Health: 132 people have died of the flu this season in the state
  • 53 children have died in the U.S. (1 in WA State). 17 children died last week alone.
  • Every part of continental U.S. has “widespread” flu activity
  • In the last couple weeks, more than 7% of all people coming into clinics and emergency departments had an influenza-like illness. That’s the highest level of activity since the deadly swine flu pandemic nearly 10 years ago.
  • The CDC says this season’s epidemic is on track to rival the 2014-15 flu season and hasn’t yet peaked as of Feb 2nd. Kristen Nordlund a CDC spokesperson said Feb 2nd, “We have not hit our peak yet, unfortunately, it’s not going down yet. Really the bottom line is there is still likely many more weeks to go [in this flu season activity].” Back in 2014-2015, the CDC estimates 34 million Americans got the flu. More than 700,000 were hospitalized. About 56,000 died. Influenza is a serious illness.

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