It’s hard to write about anything else today with news from The Supreme Court: the decision to uphold the Affordable Care Act. As a pediatrician and mom this isn’t about politics for me. It’s about the assurance that pediatric patients (my children included) can get the care they need. And that we work to make care affordable. Below are a few thoughts & quotes that have helped me understand how the decision will affect care for our children in the United States.

First off, more children will have access to health care. Children will maintain insurance for longer periods of time. And children who have congenital and chronic health conditions won’t lose their care. The majority ruling preserves key child health provisions including the law’s protections against pre-existing condition exclusions. Dr Robert Block, President of the American Academy of Pediatrics said:

Since the Affordable Care Act took effect, millions of children with pre-existing conditions gained health care coverage; 14 million children with private insurance received preventive health services with no co-pay; and 3.1 million more young adults gained coverage through their parents’ plans. These are just a few of the law’s investments in child health, with many more set to take effect over the next few years as affirmed by today’s decision.

I really appreciated this one paragraph explanation of the individual mandate from the SCOTUSBlog (via The Atlantic):

In Plain English: The Affordable Care Act, including its individual mandate that virtually all Americans buy health insurance, is constitutional. There were not five votes to uphold it on the ground that Congress could use its power to regulate commerce between the states to require everyone to buy health insurance. However, five Justices agreed that the penalty that someone must pay if he refuses to buy insurance is a kind of tax that Congress can impose using its taxing power. That is all that matters. Because the mandate survives, the Court did not need to decide what other parts of the statute were constitutional, except for a provision that required states to comply with new eligibility requirements for Medicaid or risk losing their funding. On that question, the Court held that the provision is constitutional as long as states would only lose new funds if they didn’t comply with the new requirements, rather than all of their funding.

I hope to understand more about the frustrations people have with the Affordable Care Act, too — especially as they relate to pediatric care.

What did today’s decision mean to your family? Will your children have improved access to health care? Did you feel a sense of relief?  Did you feel the opposite?