One of the most important forms I fill out in the office is the allergy action plan. The action plan is a spelled-out, step-by-step instruction form on how to care for a child who has a food allergy in the event of an accidental ingestion. Food allergies can be serious, even life threatening, yet adults are often unprepared to respond with speed and confidence. We know that 16-18% of children with food allergies have an accidental ingestion at school.

This past weekend a friend and pediatrician showed me how she is protecting her son at his new school. Instead of only filling out the paper forms for his severe food allergy, she and her son created a Youtube video action plan. Turns out, it worked. Not only was it viewed by the teachers who may need to support him in the case of an accidental ingestion, it was broadcast throughout the school. This is the new world in which we are lucky enough to live.

If your child has food allergies, consider bringing the paperwork to life. Not only can you inform caregivers on proper use and timing of antihistamines or Epipen injection, you can confirm and review the plan with your child.  All you need is a smart phone and some time on Youtube. Every child’s allergy action plan is unique. If you’re confused about when to give your child diphenhydramine (Benadryl), when to use an inhaler (albuterol), or what symptoms demand injection with an Epipen (epinephrine), don’t hesitate to call the doctor now to review.

Bringing School Paperwork to Life:

Allergy Action Plan Form courtesy of Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN). The form is fantastic–there’s even a spot for your child’s photo, decreasing chances for confusion.

Pediatrician-mom Dr Lee goes behind the scenes in the making of the above video