turkey photoMy coffee arrived in a red cup today so I know the holidays are officially upon us; Thanksgiving will be here before you know it.  If you’re ordering a turkey (and/or you’re incredibly organized) you’ll likely be picking out your bird in the next few days. Who are you people? For you prepared and pre-paid types and even those of us who wait until the Thanksgiving week, we have some decisions to make and a great opportunity. What turkey we buy matters.

This year I’ll be making the choice to purchase a turkey raised without antibiotics –when you choose this type of turkey it doesn’t mean “organic” (even some organic meats come from animals fed antibiotics). Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem and I’m taking a new step to keep my kids away from excess antibiotics, like those found in many Thanksgiving turkeys. This is new for me and hasn’t been a priority until the last few years as I’ve tuned into information about the human microbiome and ways that antibiotics in our land, food, water and pharmacies really change our own habitat and potentially our family’s health.

The Problem With Unnecessary Antibiotics

I’ve written several posts on avoiding antibiotics when unnecessary, but here’s the cliff notes version: When you (or your child) take an antibiotic, most of the susceptible bacteria exposed to the drug will die. “Good bacteria” (naturally living on our skin or in your throat or GI tract) and “bad bacteria” (the ones causing the infection) will fail to survive. However, some bacteria will possess genes that allow survival amid the presence of antibiotics. Over time and without competition from other organisms, these bacteria can even thrive. This set-up creates different colonies of bacteria where some will be resistant ‘superbugs’ and changing the bacteria in our environment and our own bodies. Some of these colonies will eventually cause infections that are hard to treat. The more antibiotics are used anywhere, the more possibilities for these ‘superbugs’ to replicate with resistance over time. In fact 97% of doctors are extremely or fairly concerned about the growing problem of antibiotic resistant infections. Most parents are worried, too.

The Case For Antibiotic-Free Turkeys

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