Doctoring & Healthcare

All Articles in the Category ‘Doctoring & Healthcare’

How To Read OTC Medication Labels

reading labels 1Reading and familiarizing yourself with the drug facts label is perhaps more important than it seems before you administer an over-the-counter (OTC) medicine to your children. I think we may get more hands-off at times than is ideal. And I think caregivers who casually help us with our children (grandparents, babysitters, nannies, neighbors) can too. Although it’s inconvenient to fill out forms for medicine administration in daycare, preschool and school, these locations seem to be the environments with the most safety around OTC medicine delivery. Those forms help remind us how important this stuff can be.

With little ones and children all heading back to school, as parents we know it’s time to buckle down and get ready for the shift in schedules and in illness that comes with onslaught of viruses that come with preschoolers and elementary-aged kids back in the classroom. Before the inevitable fall, wintery illnesses resume, it’s a great time to set aside some time to really learn how to read the drug label and learn the ingredients, why or if it’s safe for a child the ages of your kids, why the inactive ingredients matter, etc. In some ways it’s combination medicines that make me worry the most.  Read full post »

4 Things To Know If Your Son Is Off To College

male college prepYou may have already read yesterday’s blog on preparing your daughter for college. Much of my advice for girls, of course, also pertains to boys (and vice versa). I’m writing two separate posts only for the purpose of getting people to read this content, not to differentiate. I added one section here for boys (on alcohol and risks) not because it’s an issue for boys only. In fact, we know that 1 out of every 5 high school girls binge drinks (see below).

If you have a boy heading off to college this fall there are a few things to know to help improve his safety and success this year. Of anything I know from my experience being a previous school teacher, and now pediatrician and mom to boys (still 10 years away from college!) the transition from HS to college-age is one steeped in emotion for all. In addition to the tips I’ve provided for girls, alcohol and the HPV vaccine are topics to discuss to ensure it’s a better and safer year for your son (or daughter) this year.

ONE: Safe Sex & Birth Control – What Your Teen Son May Need To Know:

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Core Memories: Staggeringly Powerful

Sadness, Fear, Anger, Disgust, and Joy ... from Pixar's "Inside Out"

Sadness, Fear, Anger, Disgust, and Joy … from Pixar’s “Inside Out”

Over the weekend we saw the movie, Inside Out, with our boys. After reading previews of the film, I expected to be moved and somewhat thrilled by the look at mental health and emotions. But I walked away with a somewhat unexpected emotion: motivation.

Motivation for presence and for patience with my little boys. To me, the movie felt like a whisper, a gentle reminder in my ears to the power of each and every early experience our children take in. A prompt into the profound opportunity good — or even challenging — moments have to shape the foundation of a little developing human. Yes, we know this instinctively, but sometimes it takes a cartoon to jolt us back into focus. I’m motivated to remember that we can’t always carry the heavy load that EVERYTHING we do with our children matters all the time but it is nice to know some of these experiences really will stick forever. Read full post »

Working With Babies Of Any Age

Illustration about what it feels like to go back to work by David Rosenman

Leaving anyone we love is fraught with duplicity. While we feel the tug of distance, we have the fortuitous lens to see two things at once: the treasure of the bond forged and the aching feeling of distance when it’s gone. This binocular into our lives inspires joy but it also occasionally does bear weight. I’ve often said that leaving my babies (now children, but let’s be honest they’re always my babies) and going to work feels a little like walking around without a limb or without a necessary body part. Without them around something essential is glaringly absent. At times thinking on them is wildly distracting, especially right at first.

Up there, look at that graph. Haven’t you had days like this?

The fortune in raising and loving children is that we’re continually reminded of these dual realities. Life after a baby is forever transformed; as parents we are never again simply singular. Or at least as I see it, we’re not entirely whole again when alone. When we meet our babies big real estate in the heart is rapidly taken up by our children and although wandering, working, traveling away, and seeking new experiences is essential to our personal evolution, we do always seem to notice the absence of our babies when we’re apart. I’m coming to know this is true at any age. Read full post »

Power Of A Google Search: Community

5-22 Addison

2-year-old Addison Hyatt survived a  pediatric stroke at birth. (Image courtesy: Kaysee Hyatt)

One Google search can sometimes change everything.

After learning something new about our child’s health or condition, especially for worried parents and caregivers, leveraging online search as a resource in diagnosis, clarification and education is typical behavior. Searching out support, camaraderie and tips online just makes sense. In fact, 2013 data from the Pew Research Center finds that 1 in 3 Americans goes online to search for information and support in finding a diagnosis. If you’re a woman, college-educated, or younger (under age 49) the likelihood of searching online increases and approaches 50%. Not only are we searching for health info and connection online, we’re doing it more so with mobile devices. Pew data from April 2015 finds that 64% of Americans have a smartphone and that 6 in 10 are searching for health info on a mobile device.

That smartphone in your pocket can connect you to information yes, but also to others like you. Read full post »

Disneyland Success Story During Measles Outbreak

baby-O-e13075541951481There’s a beautiful story of success tucked away in the recent measles outbreak in the United States. Sometimes we forget to talk about it. When measles popped up at Disneyland in December 2014, it made headlines as the public remained thirsty for the media’s support in understanding who was at risk and why. I spoke to dozens of media outlets about the outbreak, under-vaccinated populations, the MMR vaccine, and how to protect those most vulnerable during an outbreak. We all emphasized those at biggest risk: infants too young to be immunized, those who were unvaccinated, or those too ill to be vaccinated. Measles is an illness I would be terrified to get — and I don’t like that people who aren’t protected are at risk for both catching the disease and spreading it. I think the public gets this in new ways although I hate that it takes outbreaks to capture attention and drive this education and understanding.

Measles virus, and the vaccine we have to prevent it, form a unique pair because although measles is wildly infectious and can be life-threatening the immunization is wildly effective and life-saving (>99% of those immunized are protected for life). It is a safe vaccine with minimal side effects. What a fortune and a triumph in prevention medicine. A terrible disease, once thought to be eradicated in the U.S., is swiftly prevented by a vaccine that nearly everyone in the population can get after their 1st birthday.

The beautiful story from the outbreak is this: Read full post »

Pale4Prom: Indoor Tanning And A Hashtag

Image courtesy: @mdub686 (Original source found here)

Image courtesy: Melissa Walling (Original source found here)

It’s prom season and we all know it’s the season where teens feel pressure (and sometimes giddy delight) to prepare to look entirely fabulous for the night. Full of pressure or full of glee, this is without a doubt the time of year when teens I see in clinic talk most about tanning.

A 2014 JAMA study found 19% of teens (under the age of 19) have used a tanning bed, with 18% of them stating that they’ve used one in the last year. That’s in every teenagers still feeling that “bronzed is better” and a thing of youthful beauty regardless of the known consequences. We have to do a better job, both as parents and as doctors and health educators, explaining the unnecessary risks teens take on when changing the color of their skin. Recently, a hashtag surfaced on social media encouraging teens to be “#pale4prom.” Thoughtful critics have raised concerns about the racial implications this campaign could ignite, I do feel this campaign can do good for those teens exploring indoor tanning. We all want to feel beautiful in skin that is protected from the sun. In my mind, the easiest word to market the idea of skin without sun is pale. I’ve urged teens to enjoy the beauty of pale skin (sometimes unsuccessfully, in clinic and in my personal life) and hope the shift from bronze to pale is a trend that continues to grow as years unfold. There’s no question we can do a better job valuing what beautiful skin really is. 5 reasons why: Read full post »

Pill Swallowing Sooner Than You Think

4-20 pill tongueAs adults, many of us take or swallow pills out of necessity to manage or prevent a chronic health condition. From a vitamin to even a life-sustaining medicine, you probably don’t hesitate or panic when swallowing the pill, even the biggies. But knowing how to swallow medicine isn’t something that just happens, often it’s a learned skill that may vary widely in regards to timing. During my education I was trained to think that once children hit double digits (age 10 years) it’s appropriate to think of them as “capable” of swallowing pills. But new findings published in Pediatrics cite research demonstrating that learning how to swallow a pill may be easier for younger children to master before they’re facing anxiety that can come from having to swallow something whole. Bottom line in the research: although many children struggle with swallowing pills, five studies reviewed find various techniques to support children with pills really do work! Mastery is possible here, but anxiousness about pill-taking spans childhood for some. Unease about pill taking can be a real barrier in treatment adherence both for children and teens with chronic health conditions.

Pill-swallowing may not come “naturally” to your child. A 2008 survey found more than 50% of children, by parental report (children from birth to age 26), were unable to swallow a standard size pill at some point. This complexity in pill-swallowing or refusal of medicines can be a once-in-a-while battle or a daily barrier at home. Many important medications are taken orally and the illness experience for parent and child is much more stressful when this challenge pops up.

Interventions Do Help

Five interventions were reviewed in the research and all of them proved beneficial for children: Read full post »

Mindfulness In A High Stakes Job

4-17 mexicoWe’re just back this week from a vacation with our children. The 6 days we had together, the variant pace at which we were able to live for the week, and the challenges that bubbled up offered some reminders but also some fears for me. We’re always on quicksand while raising children. Parenting demands exceptional grace but also exquisite flexibility and immediate rapid-fire insight. Our job descriptions, as parents, are ever-evolving; we’re asked to shift what we know as we step from stone to stone and into something new as quickly as our children do. The minute we feel we’ve figured something out — whammo — a new challenge arises we never even thought to consider.

The stakes are high. Of anything that unites us all as parents it’s knowing that truth. Along the way we will fail, fail, fail and have wondrous little successes too, thank goodness. Yet the tasks involved in raising a child will never look just like they did last month. I loved a This American Life (#553) segment I listened to this past week where a mom discussed some of the complexities in the requisite shifts she faced raising a principled little 7 year-old boy named Elias who is vegetarian and very emotional about animal-eaters. He finds himself living amid a family who explores an occasional pepperoni pizza and turkey sandwich. As his parents upend the way they eat at home (they end up banning all meat at home because of their son’s feelings) narrator Ira Glass states,

“If you’re hearing all this and you are feeling judgey about these parents and I know you are, because that is a national pastime — judging other people’s parenting – I just want to say I totally felt that way until I heard Elias….just like she says. Hearing Elias made me realize ‘oh, right, she actually is in a really tough situation. Where she has these two kids and those both have really strong feelings about this and she doesn’t want to crush either one of them.’”

Judging others’ parenting is often just the malaise of parental insecurity. We all have our own shakiness at times, especially as we’re asked to rise to new heights each new day. It’s of course so easy to judge, and so much harder to elevate and emulate others. In my mind, the best we can do while parenting (failing or succeeding) is tease out others’ profound moments. Learn from them but also copy and try those things out ourselves and see how we can make them work in our own lives. Read full post »

When Recess Is The Favorite Subject

4-13 recessMost parents cringe in the office or at the park when their child reports to me that recess is their favorite subject. Thing is, I think they may want to celebrate. Some of our best thinking, our most inventive or creative solution generation, happens when moving around outside. Research has validated the merits of play and movement for learning during the past decade and educators and pediatricians have risen up to exalt the time our children spend twirling around between math and social studies. It’s time to get excited about recess before we lose focus that it’s not just healthy weight we’re fighting for — this is about promoting healthy minds, bountiful creativity, and skills for connection too.

Tips To Advocate For Protected Recess & Play

  • White Space: I think of recess as a part of the white space we serve up for our children in life. That time and space to dream, elaborate, and enjoy whimsy in our minds. We cannot forget the value that reflection and exercise has on the creative process. When talking with your school educators and when designing a day with children make sure there are “pockets of stillness” (see #4 here on Brain Pickers) but also white space for loud iteration. No question in my mind that movement aids learning. Think of all the things you discover while going for a walk, a run or even the epiphanies you discover while taking a shower.
  • Join Forces: PTA/Lunch & Recess Matter Group. Band together with like-minded parents and educators. In the Puget Sound area, for example, only the Tacoma School District mandates a certain amount of time for recess and play. Join forces with Lunch & Recess Matter Group to re-prioritize this play and learning if it’s not happening at your school.
  • Social and emotional well-being matter (more on this later this week): Although we all want our children to have an education that affords endless opportunity (we want our children ready to be brain surgeons, artists, stay at home parents, educators, or entrepreneurs), we must remember how the time spent while playing and relating with peers may be most essential to creating pluripotent opportunity.

 Data On Recess And Play

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