Infant

All Articles in the Category ‘Infant’

Helping Your Baby Sleep: Follow Your Instincts & Follow Through

Video Take 1

As promised, this is my first video post. It’s 11:30pm Sunday night. It took a while to coordinate. This was take number 2. I waited for the sun (going against my previous post about when NOT to work) as that cloudy Friday light was too drab. Especially for sleep deprived parents. This afternoon it was sunny; proof that Seattle-ites really do see the sun.

This is a post about sleep. How to help your baby (and you) get more of it. What to do when you don’t know what sleep routine or method to follow. Which books to listen to and which to pass on to your friends.

There is no universal truth or method that is good for all parents. Rather, each sleep book or method caters to certain parenting styles and certain baby temperaments. The method you choose is less important than how you implement it. Consistency is essential in helping your baby sleep through the night. Pick a plan and follow through.

Read this summary of expert advice on interpreting sleep methods and talk with your pediatrician if you get confused. Or tired. Or both. And watch this video (click on full post to see it).

Keep The Book

We were in to see the pediatrician last month for F’s 3 year check up and back again last week for some booster shots for O. During both visits, the medical assistant asked me when the boys had received their H1N1 shots. She wanted to update the clinic’s record. I told her the 31st of October. She came back into the room puzzled,“The State of WA has them recorded on 10/24/10.”

Well, yes, she and the State of Washington were right, I was wrong. You’d think a pediatrician could keep this straight. Well, no, as it turns out. With my over-saturated and over-filled Mama brain, perfectly dated info on shots may be data points that may slip out my right ear. You too, yes? It took me 5 drawers and over a 1/2 hour to locate O’s book (above) to snap that photo. Clearly, organization of personal shot cards is not listed on my CV.
A study last week points out carrying an immunization record for your child can improve their health by increasing the likelihood of staying up to date on shots. When the boys got their H1N1 shots, I didn’t bring their immunization record books. I was all hyped up and excited about getting them and forgot due to my relative glee. I was given a little card at the time, but didn’t transfer the dates into their official books.  After discussing and reviewing my trusty phone calendar, we figured it out. Not a big deal but it wasted precious time for the staff in the clinic. Read full post »

Worry Be Gone

When the exam room door closes, most parents have some questions about how their child is developing or behaving. Competitive parenting abounds; everyone wants to prove or believe his or her child is above average. The he-did-what?-she’s-so-smart stories can strike fear in your heart when your child is nowhere near the same accomplishment and of similar age. These comparisons can sometimes lead to worry. A lightning bolt drove through my chest when my mom started to compare F to other children and expressed worry that he might never say, “Mama.” I waited impatiently and in unified worry until about 18 ½ months.

Even the mamas and papas who seem to brag at the supermarket, on the phone, or at book club about how much their child talks-walks-sleeps-eats worry. I mean it; they worry, too. Don’t let ‘em fool you. Worry may be just below sleep deprivation on the job description for parenthood. Being a pediatrician has proven this to me.

If you worry about what or how your child is doing, speak up. Let your pediatrician know. Don’t be intimidated by the length of the appointment, the reason for your worry (Joey is eating toe jam) or even if you’ve asked before. If you’ve previously discussed a problem, revisit your concern if worry remains in your heart. Your instincts matter. Read full post »

If It Were My Child: Infant Swimming Lessons

It turns out, I don’t think you do have to be careful what you wait for when it comes to swimming. A study published a few weeks ago suggested that children under the age of 2 were at higher risk for bronchiolitis, a common pediatric lung infection, if they swam in chlorinated pools when they were babies. I’ve mulled this over and done additional reading. If it were my child, I’d sign up for infant swimming lessons. Believe me, I’m not getting off any swim/pool wait list any time soon! Yet, I do think the study offers a chance to re-frame how we think about protecting our kids around the water.

Although O will be well over 2 years old when he gets off the decade long wait list for the pools in our area, he’ll be swimming in chlorinated pools before then. From how I see it, chlorine exposure is only one side of the story when it comes to infant swimming and safety. It’s okay, maybe even wonderful if I dare say, to swim with an infant. The video we have from F swimming in the first time is hilarious. I am far more ecstatic than any normal human should be in a pool. It’s true; most babies simply love the water. So do plenty of adults (read: me).

Swimming if not only delightful, it is also dangerous. Worldwide, drowning while swimming is the 2nd most common injury that kills children under age of 14. Therefore how our infants and children come to know the water may be as important as how we think about using car seats. Read full post »

See Spot Run? Anterior Fontanelle, Part 2

seespotThe soft spot feels like an epicenter in O’s landscape. As every new parent gets to know their baby, the soft spot is just one of those places and spaces we come to know that makes our baby unique. I know O’s little spot is about to go away. Just another thing for me to cry about at the two-year birthday party.

I took a phone call from the husband recently who is a pediatric radiologist and who was reading a head CT scan, inquiring when I thought the soft spot closed in infants, exactly. He knows a lot more anatomy, physiology and imaging of the skull than I do, but he had a common question: just when does it close? Like so many things in medicine, I don’t think it’s entirely clear. There is no perfect answer.  The short answer is around 1-2 year of life. But like so many things, the range of normal is expansive. Read full post »

Science Of The Soft Spot: The Anterior Fontanelle, Part 1

The soft spot on the top of my baby’s head is one of my favorite places to run my hand.  I don’t know why exactly but it seems one of those places on him that truly represents his baby-hood.  One way I know that his infancy isn’t quite gone and my baby days aren’t over yet. O recently turned a year (so, yes, technically he’s no infant) and I have felt his baby-ness slipping through my fingers. I keep saying that to my patients when they ask about him. I am hoping it will somehow prolong this period and I won’t have to wake up and find myself with two grown boys in the house.

The emotional yo-yo between pure excitement about them growing up, with the simultaneous dread of losing these baby moments, remains real and palpable. The essence of parenthood I suppose is that stew of anxiety-thrill-dread-adoration-excitement as the days unfold and you hope for new things for your little baby while lamenting the loss of precious moments of who your baby is on a Monday in January.  So the soft spot is a good place to go to calm my inner anxiety about my toddlers walking out the door to college.

Lots of new parents ask me about caring for the soft spot. As the first year unfolds, it is the soft spot (aka “fontanelle”) in the front/top portion of a baby’s head that parents ask about, the anterior fontanelle. I think we all conjure up crazy worries about an errant flying pencil landing in it. Read full post »

2 Is The New 1: Rear-Facing Car Seats Until At Least Age 2

rear-facing until age 22 is the new1.

This is kind of like, “brown is the new black.” But different and more important.

Two is the new one. When you’re a toddler. And when you’re at least 20 pounds.

And you’re in the car.

Let me explain. This is important for a number of reasons. One, not a lot of people (even pediatricians) know this yet because new data hasn’t been incorporated into policy statements. And two, it could save lives. Three and four: it could save lives.

Listen up and tell your friends. Scream from the rooftops. Read full post »

The Juggle: Working And Breastfeeding

ShadowA study in Pediatrics highlighting the importance of breastfeeding and the challenges for working moms was published earlier in 2009. Today, it circulated through a business journal and got some more attention.

I read the study today for the first time. Then I re-read it a number of times. I talk about breastfeeding with moms and parents in clinic on a daily basis. I certainly know the challenges of trying to breastfeed through a transition back to work. I also know how hard it is not to be able to do what you set out to do.

I had my go. With my first son, I saw about 9 lactation consultants in the first week. I am not exaggerating. Me with those women hovering over me trying to help while my little man screamed his head off. The beginnings of motherhood. I breast fed, finger fed, pumped breast milk, finger fed, breast fed, then pumped my way into a sleepless oblivion. Read full post »

Another Day, Another H1N1 Recall

OuchlessOuch. Another recall. But this time for the ouchless shot, the nasal mist H1N1 vaccine. The CDC announced last night that there is recall of about 4.7 million doses of nasal spray H1N1 immunizations. These are nasal spray vaccines used in children (and adults) over the age of 2 years. This is just a set-back in protecting our country (and the globe) from the harms of H1N1. No, not a safety concern. Not conspiracy. Rather, a concern that doses are losing potency over time. Think shelf-life. The issue or concern is that these shots may not have the potency level we want over time to remain effective. It’s like that old watercolor you made for your mom in 5th grade fading in the sun.  Or when you run out of Kool-Aid mix and you stretch it to make more.  The worry is these doses may be less effective with time. Read full post »

If It Were My Child: H1N1 Shots, Yes!

O H1N1 shotI heard about the recall of about 800,000 doses of H1N1 shots intended for children 6-35 months today. The news doesn’t scare me at all. Zilch-o. Zippo. Zero. And I scare easily. I jump in the seat in the movie theater when it’s loud or dark or someone does something scary.  Really.

This recall does not affect how I will continue to encourage families to get their children immunized. This is not a recall due to safety concerns.  I strongly remain in support of immunizing all children against H1N1, especially those with infant siblings, those under age 2 years, or those with underlying health conditions.
I heard about the Canadian reports of fever in children after the second dose of H1N1, too. None of this makes me hesitate. The H1N1 shot is produced in the same way that the seasonal flu shot has been produced for 60 years.  Read full post »