Parenting

All Articles in the Category ‘Parenting’

Whoops: Over-The-Counter Dosing Errors Common

OTC revised infoIt’s that time of year again. The season of snot and mucus and colds….if you’re a parent you may even call this “sick season.” Typical cold viruses are getting readily exchanged as recirculated air in crowded malls, classrooms and daycares facilitate exchange of the germs. It’s more than inevitable that one of your kids will come down with something. Those 6-10 colds that children get on average, every year, have arrived which means there’s a good chance you’ll be up late one night with a feverish or coughing child reaching for an over-the-counter (OTC) medicine . Data proves we’re all at risk for making a dosing error. Remarkable how easy it is to do. As a pediatrician I always have to check (and double check) the label when I’m home dosing my kids. The bottles and doses are all so different.

A new study in Pediatrics found that every eight minutes a child under the age of 6 experiences a medication error (outside the doctor’s office or hospital). Over the course of ten years (2002-2012) 696,937 children experienced medication errors. Young children (under age 1) had the highest rate of errors making up more than 25% of the total number. For parents these may be easy mistakes to make as containers and dosing devices aren’t always clear (nor are they consistent) even after FDA rule changes were made a few years back.

It’s important to note that the study referencing dosing errors (above) found dosing errors from cough & cold medicine are thankfully going down while dosing errors around other meds are actually rising. It’s also of import to say that most pediatricians don’t recommend OTC cough and cold meds for children under age 6 anyway as they provide little benefit and put children at risk for side effects and dosing errors. Read full post »

An Unfair Advantage

MIL photoI recently listened to an interview on This American Life that stuck with me. The show was entitled “It’s Not The Product, It’s The Person” and went through a series of examples uncovering the reality that great business (or great work) is more a product of the who than the what. Who people are, how much grit, tenacity, raw or natural talent, passion, or skill really matters when doing whatever it is that that they do. Far more perhaps than what they actually create, sell or even perform. And although this isn’t the point I mean to make (you’ll see) it’s worth noting that the show opens with details of a young entrepreneur, like really young (age 11 years) and demonstrates how her talents, bravado, and finesse allow her to sell things and attract attention that others can’t. The show rounds out as the narrator showcases the varying pitfalls in his own quest for success as an ex-NPR radio producer turned start-up entrepreneur. The story was somewhat lighthearted, of course, but one point stuck. As he was gleaning information from an established, successful venture capital investor he was asked a potent question. The investor was interrogating how this fledgling entrepreneur could get funding; assisting him in creating his “pitch” for the money people. He asked, “What’s your unfair advantage?”

Think about it, what’s your unfair advantage?

It stuck with me because it was so relevant for success in an often random, senseless world of building ideas and companies but also in parenting “like a pro.” An unfair advantage sometimes facilitates success and I would suggest nearly all of us have something in our pocket that we know makes it work. You can think of this unfair advantage in terms of celebrity or early success for some (Kate Hudson’s mom is Goldie Hawn after all, and it certainly seems easier to get a bedroom in The White House if your last name is Bush or Kennedy or Clinton for that matter). Yet we all also know that success isn’t only built of “unfair advantages,” that it does take advantage wed to sheer passion, purpose or intent. But clearly those unfair advantages help people get their ideas and skills discovered.

It was only recently that I realized my unfair advantage this past decade or so. Read full post »

More Data That Laundry “Pods” Carry Risk

pod photo croppedLaundry detergent pods continue to cause trouble — increasing convenience yet posing risks to young children. New data out today confirms what we’ve seen since their introduction. These cute, colorful and entirely convenient laundry packets (typically called “pods”) were introduced in the U.S. in 2012 and quickly made measuring out laundry detergent a thing of the past. Unfortunately we’ve also seen that these pods grab the attention of young children. Beautiful design gone wrong. As you’ve likely heard, or witnessed yourself, young children can be drawn to the pods (often these packets of detergent look like a preschooler’s toy or a piece of candy) and because of young children’s unique method of exploration (infants/toddlers/preschools use their mouths as much as their eyes & hands to explore) they may be at risk for injuries if the detergent pods are in arm’s reach. New research out today from Pediatrics documents an ongoing onslaught of children exposed to laundry pods, more than 17,000 children in less than two years. Some in the media have translated the volume of calls to poison control — a call every hour in this country — secondary to exposures to these packets of concentrated detergent.

Single-Dose Detergent Concerns

The first warnings about the dangers of laundry pods came out in May of 2012.  The American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) started getting calls about children getting in to the capsules and ABC news did a subsequent story warning parents about the risks. Several factors make the pods a serious risk for young children: they’re appealing to the eye (look how fun and colorful the Tide pods look in the photo above) and small in size.  They also have a thin membrane (built to dissolve quickly in the wash) and are full of highly concentrated soap. It’s unclear exactly why this concentrated liquid causing so many new symptoms (vomiting, coughing, or rarely severe breathing problems and severe symptoms like changes in level of alertness or seizures). Dr. Suzan Mazor, an emergency physician at Seattle Children’s, adds she’s seen several eye abrasions, which happen when children accidentally squirt the pod contents in their eyes. She adds, “These ultimately heal just fine but can be painful and distressing to the children and parents.” The ingestions have been serious enough at times to send children to the ICU and need mechanical ventilation. With the beautiful curiosity of a toddler coupled to the lack of judgement, you have a recipe for this “pod” problem. Here’s a look at it by the recent study numbers:

  • 17,230 – Children under the age of 6 exposed to laundry pods (between Feb. 2012 – Dec. 2013), the majority being ingestions. The AAPCC reports that 8,915 exposures have already been reported in 2014 (data through end of September, 2014)
  • 645% -The increase in exposures to laundry packets between March 2012 – April 2013
  • 74% – The percentage of children exposed to detergent packets who are under age 3 years. Clearly toddlers are the most vulnerable group when it comes to these packets of detergent
  • 80% - The percentage of ingestion for the reported cases. This translates out that 8 of 10 children who have an exposure put these pods in their mouths. About 7% of children have injuries to their eyes, and the remaining 3% are a combination of skin injuries and damage caused by inhalation into the lungs
  • #1 – #1 household product ingested in Italy. This isn’t just a US problem. In Italy, where detergent pods have been available since 2010, the product is the number one most commonly ingested household product
  • 56% – More than 1/3 of kids vomit after an ingestion. For overall exposures, 48% percent of children exposed to pods vomited, making it the most common side effect. After vomiting comes coughing  or choking (13%), eye irritation or pain (11%), drowsiness or lethargy (7%), and eye redness (6%)

pod poison timeline

What Parents Need to Know:

Read full post »

Baby Talk: How Moms And Dads May Differ

baby talk photo edited

There may be a stereotype that women talk more than men; the language environment in which we’re raised, starting at day one, may have influence on this. Whether or not women are chattier than men is due largely in part to the context of the conversation. But a new study published in Pediatrics shows when it comes to parents talking to their babies, the term “Chatty Cathy” probably rings truer than “Chatty Carl.” And this has the potential to change the game with your child as they age. It’s well founded that the number of words your baby/child hears in the first few years of life has dramatic impact on their vocabulary, school success and education for a lifetime. Parent-talk has more impact on a child’s IQ and vocabulary than their education or socioeconomic status. Who we are as talkers really changes our babies’ lives.

Gender Differences In “Baby-Talk” And “Parent-Talk”

The Pediatrics study out this week evaluated the intersection of both baby-talk (comparing preterm and term baby boys and girls vocalizations for 16 hours at a time) and parent-talk (comparing Moms’ to Dads’ vocalizations to their infants) at birth, at about a month of age (based on original due date), and at 7 months of age. More than 1500 hours of recordings (derived from little devices worn on babies’ vests) were analyzed to compare family language interactions. Babies in families with a Mom and Dad at home were included (no same-sex couples). About ½ of the babies were late preemies (note: 1/4 of all the babies studied had a stay in the NICU) and 1/3 of families were raising children in a bilingual home. I found three key takeaways: Read full post »

Teal Pumpkin Owners Deserve a Treat

teal pumpkin If you see a house with a teal pumpkin in front of it when you’re out with your kids this Halloween, give that homeowner a high-five. They’re making it a point to include kids with food allergies in on the trick-or-treating fun during this candy-filled holiday.

The Seriousness Of Food Allergies

Food allergies are a serious subject. It’s estimated more than 15 million Americans (6 million of them children) are affected by them. Dealing with food allergies can mean disruption to daily life and changing the way you celebrate holidays (so many are focused on food!).  Case in point, several of the 8 most common foods & food groups that can cause serious reactions are found in Halloween candy. Think: milk, wheat, peanuts, eggs, soy and tree nuts (also fish and crustacean shellfish, but you probably don’t have to worry about the neighbors handing out fish-sticks tonight).

What’s The Deal With The Teal Pumpkins?

The Teal Pumpkin Project is a campaign started by FARE (Food Allergy Research and Education) to promote safety, community and inclusion for children with food allergies. Read full post »

Move The Clock: 30 Minutes For 3 Days

clock - daylight savingThe end of daylight saving time is upon us…in fact today is the day you want to think about it most if you have children in your house. Here’s why: prepping for the transition may save you some pain, and some sleep. Although a one-hour shift in time may not seem a big deal to adults, many of us with young children have learned the hard way that this transition isn’t as easy for toddlers and young children — often “falling back” doesn’t equate to an extra hour of sleep on Sunday morning. Some things in life are definitely NOT guaranteed during parenthood.

Dr. Maida Chen, director of the Pediatric Sleep Center here at Seattle Children’s says it perfectly. “The first thing to know is that younger children, especially, are not going to budge their ‘body clocks’ just because the time on the clock face changes.  As a parent, be prepared for an earlier morning start on Sunday and Monday.”

Can 30 Minutes Make A Difference?

Would cutting the difference help (i.e prepping for the 1-hour shift in advance)? Well, I think so, especially after consulting some sleep experts. Enter Dr. Maida Chen again, my friend and sleep expert (ahem, and Power Mama of 3) and Dr. Craig Canapari, a sleep expert, father and blogger out East. Dr. Canapari suggests cutting the difference and softening the change by moving your child’s sleep period later by 30 minutes for three days before “falling back.” That means today (Thursday) is the day to start thinking about it. This way you’ll get them 1/2 way to the time change and making going to bed at the “new time” easier. For example, if bedtime is 8pm now, move bedtime tonight and for the next three nights to 8:30pm (that’s the new 7:30 starting on Sunday). Read full post »

Marijuana Mixer: Teen Use, Child Ingestion

Washington Poison Center http://www.wapc.org/wp-content/uploads/WAPC-Toxic-Trends-Report-Cannabis-September.pdf

Washington Poison Center http://bit.ly/1xT8PeJ

The 2nd recreational pot store opened in Washington State recently while store #3 opens later this week. Pace will quicken with several more stores expected to open by year-end. This puts parents and pediatricians in our state in a unique situation (shared only with Colorado) as we’re tasked to explain to children and teens the dangers of legalized drugs used by adults. However, the complexity extends even to those of us with young children. Growing concern (and evidence) finds accidental ingestion of pot among children, often in the form of edibles, is also accelerating. Online in social channels I’ve heard some argue that marijuana legalization is to be thought of like alcohol but the packaging and delivery of the drug really are far different.

Marijuana Use By Teens Still Illegal Yet Common

  • Nearly half of all teens have tried pot by the time they finish high school while almost 1/4 of all high school students report having used marijuana in the past month. That’s pretty common.
  • 35 different marijuana-infused food & beverages have been approved by WSLCB  (cookies, trail mix, peanut brittle, gummy bears, and chocolate bars for example). Often the packaging for these products looks as attractive as a fruit roll-up or delicious candy bar typically marketed to children.
  • There have been 68 pediatric marijuana exposures voluntarily reported to Washington State poison control already this year. Because reporting isn’t mandatory this is potentially an underestimate of the number of children exposed to marijuana accidentally.

Read full post »

Digital Parenting: 5 Ways To Compartmentalize

26% of parents say they’ve used media as a distraction when with their children and we all certainly know our own smartphone use may be changing who we are as parents. No question I get cranky with my kids if I’m emailing on my phone and they interrupt me. Just one of many unfortunate realities of having work with us at all times. The more devices I use and the better they become at helping me enjoy life, the more imminent the need for getting serious about the daily calisthenics of doing things without our devices. Remember this article, Don’t Text While Parenting: It Could Make You Cranky ? It is becoming more and more uncomfortable for us to be away from our “phones” as we progressively depend upon them for daily living. I use my phone as a computer, a mail service, an organizer, a calendar, a video camera, an activity tracker, and a GPS every day. Of course I like when it’s around but there is also NO question that the best part of the last week of my life was time when my device wasn’t in arm’s reach…

5 Tips For Compartmentalizing Your Digital Life

  • On a Diet: We parents can model effective “media diets” to help children learn to be selective and thoughtful about compartmentalizing digital tools. I fail at this all the time, slipping into old habits or just “checking something quickly” online when unnecessary. Working on crafting a plan for what I consume and when I consume it, helps. Also thinking about what our children watch and play online/with devices and for how long, helps too. Yes, have movie night but also think about co-viewing programs with your children of any age and spend time discussing values and reactions you have to shows you watch and apps you play together. Be intentional showing your children the things you do to minimize technology interfering with things you love (keeping cell phones out of bedroom, putting cell phone in backseat of the car so you don’t text and drive).

Read full post »

Media Deprivation?

media deprivationMedia deprivation: do you think it exists? Although laughable at first glance I know I’m not the only parent who wonders if limiting screen time could change my child’s opportunity. Those of us who fiercely control screen/device time may have momentary lapses where we wonder if we’re doing things right. Even though I’m convinced there isn’t a study telling us that typically-developing children need media/apps/screen time to learn how to think and evolve into compassionate, successful, and happy adults, part of me wonders if my screen policing isn’t ideal.

Are You Screen-Phobic Parent?

There may be an inverse relationship worth noting: perhaps the more a parent loves technology, the more they see technology’s omnipotence and its invasive, devious elegance. Do those of us who adore technology consequently limit its use at home? Unsure there are data to back this up, however there are some nice anecdotes. Turns out Steve Jobs was a low-tech parent. “We limit how much technology our kids use at home,” he said. In addition, The New York Times reports that Chris Anderson, former editor of Wired Magazine and current CEO of a drone company draws hard lines:

This is rule No. 1: There are no screens in the bedroom. Period. Ever.

The American Academy of Pediatrics guides us that media should be limited (ideally to less than 2 hours daily) and advises us to protect the sanctity of the place our children sleep by keeping screens out. Pediatricians work heroically in the office trying to help families  get a sense of why moderation with media matters and the benefits for making media plans. You’ve probably heard about concocting a “media diet” and ways to reduce screen time, especially before bed. Some of us take it pretty far…our children may go days and weeks without screens while at home. Perhaps its my own technology enthusiasm and unending quest for balance with devices that has me locking up all the tablets and computers at home. In our home the phones, tablets and computer have taken the place of Drano — they’re up and out of reach. Read full post »

Spanking is Hitting Afterall

In my mind it’s no wonder the American Academy of Pediatrics has a statement against spanking. Spanking, in the simplest form, is the act of hitting a child, using physical force to try to get a different outcome. Thing is, spanking is an ineffective discipline tool in the long-run and research shows it’s damaging to a child’s mental health. Most parents don’t want to spank their children and may spank or strike a child while frustrated, making spanking more than just a tool for discipline, rather at times just another way to vent anger or frustration…

I’d say we spend countless hours teaching and modeling behaviors for our children in early childhood to ensure they do the opposite of spanking: we teach them to “use their words,” take “timeouts,” and to take deep breaths when frustrated or when throwing an enormous, inconvenient tantrum. We teach them to look for an adult for support if they need “back-up” during conflict resolution. When an adult turns around and uses physical force and strikes a child, they teach just the opposite. Spanking is hitting and hitting is always avoidable when enmeshed in a conflict.

If that doesn’t seem quite right to you consider it this way: under the US law, when angry or upset about the way things are going in your life the only person you can legally hit in our culture is a child. I’d suggest they are the most vulnerable and voiceless in this regard, the only members of our society with no capacity to change the law (vote). Just this winter lawmakers have argued to allow spanking at home and school that could leave a child bruised in the name of “parental rights.” In the US, you can’t punch or beat up your neighbor, your child’s teacher, your co-worker (assault), thankfully you can’t strike your partner/wife/husband (domestic abuse), and you can’t punch your other relatives (assault). But in many states in our nation, it’s legal to hit your child when they do something you didn’t want them to do. Of note, it’s still lawful to spank a child at school in up to 19 states.

As of 2014, up to 38 countries around the world have banned spanking, outlawing corporal punishment in terms of human rights in a different way from The United States. During an NPR interview yesterday, Professor Elizabeth Gershoff highlighted this in historical context to American opinion on spanking stating, Read full post »