Parenting

All Articles in the Category ‘Parenting’

Parenting In 2015

My little love in the snow yesterday. Part of my #worklifebetter life hack!

My little love in the snow yesterday. Part of my #worklifebetter life hack!

Time capsule entry. Although I suppose every parent since creation felt that the time in which they were raising their children was somehow novel, I’m moved by our 21st-century digital connection to share a transparent take on being a mom and pediatrician today. It’s the end of 2015 and overwhelmingly, I think many of us are stretched thin. And although our children are more-than-ever-before extraordinary, somethings gotta give.

First things first, as a perhaps totally-exhausted-working-full-time-emotionally-laden-at-baseline mom trying to find center, I keep reaching for poetry from Mary Oliver. Here she sets me flying in a portion of her poem, Spring Azures:

Sometimes the great bones of my life feel so heavy,

and all the tricks my body knows–

the opposable thumbs, the kneecaps,

               and the mind clicking and clicking– 

                                                                                                                         don’t seem enough to carry me through this world

                                                                        and I think: how I would like

                                                                         to have wings–

                                                                         blue ones–

                                                                          ribbons of flame.

Oh, how our minds always seem to be clicking and clicking and clicking and clicking…and those blue wings, the ones of flames? Yes, please sign me up.

A friend, a few years ago referred to their spouse as having a “busy brain” and I’ve thought on it since. Don’t all parents? Or is that the 2015 talking?

The 2015 realities aren’t surprising to any of us: the earnest tether to a smartphone, the wild ease to immediately compress and access news from the entire globe, the immense pressure to have a career wed to the impressive surge in being asked to be wildly productive everywhere (at home, at work, at volunteering, at exercising, at being present). The heavy burden of being told to elegantly role-model (hello, parenthood), the urgency we feel to then perfect raising children, all the advice (!!) out there floating around and intentionally pushed our way in social networks. And then the never-ending stream of in-arm’s-reach science of what we know to be good for us (sleep, flossing, daily exercise, leafy greens, friendship, “balance”, a job with purpose, BPA-free) and what we know even more is bad for us (sleep deprivation, unemployment, stress, smoking, divorce, bad cholesterol, processed meat, sedentary days). I mean…. Read full post »

Quick Tips For Healthy Winter Skin

Winter SkinWinter tests our skin differently than summer. This is because of cold temperatures, recirculated air (without outside humidity) and lots of exposure to the elements. If you think your skin looks older in winter, you might be right. Winter skin is likely really dry and probably chapped, making us perhaps look a bit like we’ve been at this a while…same can be true of your child’s skin. Giving your skin the TLC it needs during these dark months will keep it healthy (and looking great) once it’s time again for spring exposure. Lots of OTC lotions and creams to choose from. Here’s a bit on which and why:

Dry Skin And “The Itch That Rashes”

Winter is also a time when we see an increased risk for eczema flare-ups, a chronic, relapsing condition that brings incredibly dry, itchy patches of skin. The icing on the cake is that eczema primarily affects kids! A recent study suggests at least 10% of children in the US suffer from eczema, the “rash that itches.” A patch gets started, a child can’t help but itch it and the rash blooms. Between 2000 & 2010 pediatric cases of eczema came close to doubling and while this condition not only affects how skin looks and feels, it can have a direct impact on a child’s quality of life. Nearly half of kids with eczema report a severely negative impact on their quality of life, including sleep deprivation (from the itching), activity restriction and even depression. If your child suffers from eczema, talk to your pediatrician to create an action plan for combating these dry months and hopefully avoiding such severe tolls and trolls on everyday life.

Protecting Your Skin From Sun

Read full post »

Calming Down And Talking To Our Children About School Violence

Gun Safety family on hillSchool violence and threats of violence are scary and seem to be happening more and more frequently, but the fortunate reality is that they remain rare.  I’m almost telling myself this like a chant — trying to keep myself centered. Because like many other parents I’ve talked to, instead of worrying about my son getting lice at school I kiss him good-bye and say a blessing for safety. Happened today again.

2015 has been hard for all of us in this respect. The increased media discussions about violence are shaking us up and focusing light on violence, especially from guns and mass shootings, in ways no one ever wanted or could imagine.

Although mass shootings are dreadfully more common now than in the past, the rate of crime at U.S. schools that involve physical harm has been declining since the early 1990s. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), fewer than 1% of all homicides among school-age children happen on school grounds or on the way to and from school. The vast majority of students will never experience violence at school or in college.

Still, it’s natural for kids and teens (and those who adore them, feverishly) to worry about whether something may happen to them. To help them deal with these fears, it’s important to talk to children who are in the know when these tragedies happen, and to know what your kids watch or hear about them. This helps put frightening information into context. This helps build trust.

Children should be informed about a disaster as soon as information becomes available. Children can sense when critical information is being withheld and when trusted adults are not being genuine; this, in turn, undermines their trust and sense of safety and compromises the ability of these adults to be later viewed as a source of support and assistance. Even very young children or those with developmental disabilities can sense the distress of trusted adults. Children also often overhear or otherwise learn information about the events, such as through the Internet or social media or from conversations with other children. We probably need to shift the conversation sometimes away from talking our children out of having legitimate concerns to how do you deal with your concerns.” ~Dr. David Schonfeld

8 Tips To Support Your Children’s Understanding Of School Violence

Read full post »

Ban Baby Crib Bumpers

bumpersI cleaned out the closet for houseguests last week and discovered an old bumper. Instead of giving it away I am literally cutting up the fabric for crafts and putting the rest in the garbage. A no-brainer savvy parenting tip: baby crib bumpers are dangerous. Don’t use them, don’t even give them to charity, don’t pass them on to friends. Let’s get them out of circulation, outsmart the marketers, protect these little babies.

Smart parents just don’t use crib bumpers. More data out this past month to prove it.

Crib bumpers are soft bedding that can pose risk of suffocation, entrapment, strangulation, or additional risks from causing a baby to be wedged into an unsafe position. It may seem like they protect babies, but there is no evidence they prevent serious injury in infants. Choosing a crib can be an exciting nesting activity, here’s tips for doing it with smarts.

Banning bumpers feels to many like an inconvenient truth. Perceived risk is low and they are so darn cute. But with all the time we spend as parents spend doing everything we can to protect our babies this is an easy opt-out. Forget spending time worrying about organic baby food and what brand of stroller of you want and just get rid of your bumper. Or better yet, don’t buy one in the first place. Let’s get them off baby registry lists, out of marketing and advertising and most importantly OUT of baby’s crib. Read full post »

No Kitchen Spoons! Correct Medication Dosing

OTC Dosing Image

Over the counter (OTC) liquid medications for children are packaged with a diverse set of various measuring tools sometimes making it confusing for parents to ensure we are giving our children the proper dose. To add to the confusion, sometimes the recommended dose is written with different units (mLs, mg, or teaspoons) than the dosing device. For example, the box might have dosing in “teaspoons” and the measuring device be divided up into milliliters. This issue is not new but guidelines and protections around the problem are increasing. A win!

This has concerned me for a long time. To drive this point home even further, I gave a dosing conversion quiz on my blog to my colleagues in medicine (also parents) who even struggled to get the dosing correct. The dosing struggle is REAL to non-pediatric docs and parents everywhere.

For example, you may even see differences in devices that would seem to be standard across medications. The dropper that comes with liquid acetaminophen may look very different than the dropper that comes with liquid vitamin D or infant multivitamins. And remember, the most important way to avoid a dosing error is to keep the original dosing device with the actual OTC medication. Read full post »

Bigger Peace: Let Fear Spur Presence

FullSizeRender (1)Friday afternoon the terrorist attacks around the world certainly took our collective breath away. The stunning, horrific realities and the wild insecurity we can feel when somewhere familiar becomes unsafe is a potent storyteller. There is something in this though, that we can really listen to.

Things tend to happen in slow motion after this kind of news, almost like they do in our memories during scary recollections of a car accident or a big fall, because when some beloved familiar place is deemed unsafe we can tingle with such scare it pushes us towards vitality. It’s awareness. In ways, the fear these familiarities provoke shrinks the world, changes the scope of what is at stake every single day for every single one of us, and connects us again to how similar we are. Sounds have been crisper under our feet since Friday, the breeze on our face more notable this weekend, and all of a sudden the moment we’re in takes on quite a significance. We can feel so alive and connected to each other in this fear.

We all know fear hones priorities, even momentarily, and reminds us of the sincere gift of a day with those we love. With the news Friday the every day constructed problems at work or in our personal lives dim as the monumental relevance of connection, friendship, family, and freedom again takes on new light. This is a cycle, of course. We cannot hold the intensity and fears of our insecurity in our hands ALL the time to drive presence. Most of us can’t be mindful every single moment either. We’d be muzzled and paralyzed if we let this tincture of storytelling in too much too soon too constantly…but there’s this: Read full post »

U.S. Soccer Bans Headers For Kids Under 10

Soccer HeaderOur kids don’t have to play like the pros, even if we they think they’re ready. I mean really, what’s the rush?? I report this as a pediatrician & as a bona fide soccer mom to 2 boys under age 10:

The U.S. Soccer Federation yesterday announced a ban on “headers” for children under 10 years. There has been no new expert consensus (the new rule rose out of a lawsuit, not new pediatric expert opinion) that heading the ball causes changes/damage to the brain. Although headers have been found to cause concussions, more often children are concussed when hit by a falling ball or after a collision. Research published this fall in JAMA Pediatrics found about 30% of boys’ concussions and 25% of girls’ concussions in high school soccer are a result of heading. Regardless, more research is needed to determine the safety of heading the ball throughout young and late childhood. In the meantime there are 3 things we can all know (and advocate for)  as research teases out early head injury and the influence heading may have over an athlete’s lifetime:

  1. Headers require essential technique to reduce injury: If heading the ball, young players need to learn proper technique (head positioning, neck position, have appropriate muscular strength etc) so using their forehead they reduce likelihood for injury. Most pediatric sports experts opine that this is unlikely to be easy for little players to reliably learn this technique under age 10 years. It’s unclear what degree heading causes concussion and long-standing injury. “Collision,” pediatric experts wrote in 2010 for Pediatrics, “rather than purposeful heading, was found to be the most likely cause for acute head injuries in soccer players treated in emergency departments.” 
  2. Appropriate Balls: We need to reduce risk of injury by ensuring balls are appropriate size for players, that balls are NOT hyper-inflated and thus more firm, and that balls are water-resistant (so as to not take on water and be heavier). Smarter play, smart equipment. 
  3. Smarter Timelines For Rules: Graduated rules like this (no headers under 10, limited headers for young teens, and then routine headers thereafter) make sense. Not all 8 year-olds need to play by the rules of the pros. Why the rush?

Heading among pre-adolescents is usually a random act. Eyes shut. Head scrunched into neck. Shoulders clenched. ~ Slate.com

Read full post »

Quick Ask This Flu Season: Peer To Peer Protection

If our entire community got the flu vaccine we’d be MUCH less likely to share it. We’d also be much less likely to get influenza. Studies find that about 10-40% of children get influenza each season. Because their immune systems are a bit “naive” to influenza, they are at risk for more serious illness, especially if under age 5 years.

What if parents were the ones to endorse protection from influenza? What if we drove our schools and playgroups and community protection? I want our communities safe and healthy this flu season and our best defense is the flu vaccine, staying home when ill, and covering our coughs. It may be the mom-to-mom-dad-to-dad message that is most powerful…

The match between the flu vaccine (nasal spray and the shot) and circulating strains of influenza are better this year (including the H3N2 strain). That means the flu vaccine will likely be far more effective in protecting our families!

Data has shown us that nearly 1/2 of the adult population does NOT get their flu shot, yet 75% of parents to young children DO get their young children and toddlers vaccinated. Parents really do want their children protected and although pregnant moms are at high risk for flu only about 50% got their flu vaccine last year. Not only does mom get protection of her own health when she gets the vaccine, she passes on antibodies to her baby!

Will you share a video with your community? I created the below series of flu videos in partnership with The American Academy of Pediatrics targeted to specific demographics and age ranges. You can share them via email, social media or in-person. Help me make the case to ensure our kids are healthy and protected this flu season. I’ve provided the videos and links to share them below. Thank you for joining me in avoiding influenza this year. Share one of these videos?

8 & Under: Why Flu Vaccine Is an Every-Year Thing!

Link to share: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kS9mgx8Bemg

 

Read full post »

Teens Getting High: DXM Cough Medicine

OTC Cough MedsDrug abuse is on every parent’s mind. We simply don’t want our children to ever go down the road of drug addiction. To empower parents to spot the warning signs and help prevent teen abuse of over-the-counter (OTC) cough medicine containing dextromethorphan (DXM), the Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA) is sharing the results of qualitative and quantitative research of teens. The quantitative (numbers-based) research began in 2013 and is conducted three times a year. Here’s some insight from that data: Read full post »

What You Can Do: Children And Safe Gun Storage

Gun Safety family on hillGun violence is a tricky topic to write about. It’s emotionally laden, there are political overtones that bring out passion and I find quicksand when I never expect it.

No matter where you fall on issues related to firearm safety, there is no doubt that we all want the same thing: healthy communities, healthy families, and safe environments to raise our children.

Unfortunately, we continue to have countless reminders about the curiosity of children in the presence of a loaded firearm. No question children and guns are a dangerous combination.

According to the Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance Survey that is administered nationally by CDC, in 2013, there were an estimated 73,000 Washington state children that resided in homes where guns were loaded and unlocked. Nationally, 1.7 million children and teens in the U.S. live in a home with a loaded, unlocked gun.

Kids don’t always know what to do when they find one, but curiosity leads. In a research study entitled, “Seeing Is Believing,” researchers put boys in a room where there were water guns and pistols and watched behind a mirror while they played. The 8 to 12 year-old boys who stumbled upon a gun had a hard time figuring out it if was a toy or a real gun. When they did find it, almost half pulled the trigger. Half pulled the trigger! CURIOSITY is that innocent, protectable right of children that drives this dangerous act.

I don’t need to detail deaths, but quick mentions of gun-related injuries and tragic losses in America can bring fresh energy for necessary safety measures we are all responsible for, gun owners or not. A 3-year-old in New Mexico shot his parents when he grabbed a gun out of his mother’s purse and not the iPod or phone he was searching for. The mother was pregnant and there was also a 2-year-old girl in the room at the time. In the past month we’ve heard about the horrific tragedies with three shootings on college campuses and the unthinkable tragedy of an 11-year-old who shot an 8-year-old this past month over wanting to see a puppy.

Read full post »