Podcast

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Parent Sleep Matters

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Sleep is tied to our outlook, our mood, our performance, our safety, and our sense of stress/anxiety. We’re nicer people after we sleep and I often say that after a good night of sleep I get to be more of the mom & parent I earnestly want to be. Sleep is magical that way.

Thing is, sleep has a profound effect on our perspectives and attitudes about life. In fact research has found that sleep loss causes bias in our memory — the less sleep we have the more we focus on negative events and the more our memory builds space for memories of the negative details in our life. In addition, the less we sleep, the less we think our children do. Huge opportunity to improve things when we not only prioritize our children’s sleep but our own.

For more listen to the podcast and read this and this where I talk with sleep expert, Dr. Maida Chen and discuss 5 ways to improve our own sleep and our family’s wellbeing.

Seattle Mama Doc Podcast Is Live

Audio is having a moment and I’m hooked. I am so thrilled to announce the launch of my Seattle Mama Doc podcast! It’s a weekly, quick, 5-15 minute show to help guide you through the joys and the complications of parenting. I’ll share what I’ve learned throughout my career in pediatrics and years of parenting my own 2 children, but also really hope to get super smart people to share what they know out to the world! The podcasts will air each week and will include interviews with pediatric experts, researchers, and peers across the country who are committed to preventing illness and injury while raising children — but this will also be a show sharing wisdom into how to enjoy the immense and privileged task of raising our babies into adults. The goal here is to breakdown all the guilt we have, doubts we share, and give us a boost in knowing what we’re doing well. Parenting is high-stakes but we really do have this.

You can listen to a couple of the first few episodes below and you can download episodes on SoundCloud, iTunesGoogle Play Music & Stitcher. Please subscribe and let me know what you think!

I recorded several episodes on sleep with my good friend and the Director of the Seattle Children’s Pediatric Sleep Disorders Center, Dr. Maida Chen. She’s a mom to 3, pediatric pulmonologist and sleep science guru. She’s also just uber-articulate. Here’s a blog post we did together a few years about with more on why and when children dream.  More podcasts arriving weekly on Tuesdays.

Maida Recording

All Dogs Bite


To the owner of the two black poodles who bit my husband last Saturday early morning while running at Magnuson park, this is for you. But also for all of us as a reminder to something I know both from the medical data and from life experience too well: all dogs bite. Even when an owner assures you they don’t or won’t.

For many, having a dog isn’t just having a pet, they are clearly part of our families. We invest, we believe, we protect, and we stand behind them. I’ve written about the love my family has for our sweet dog Luna who passed away a year ago this month. Many of us love our dogs for many reasons, and they even have been shown to boost humans’ health in psychosocial but also fundamental ways. A study published in JAMA Pediatrics back in 2015 found that exposure to dogs during a baby’s first year was linked to a 13% lower risk of asthma in school age children. Having a dog also helps teach children responsibility and can boost their self-esteem. But we do have to remember, dogs are animals and they act like it when provoked, frightened or activated. All dogs will bite given the right circumstance. Coincidental to a dog bite in my family, this week is National Dog Bite Prevention Week and I’m sharing some tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) for keeping your family and children safe from dog bites.

Each year, more than 4.5 million people in the U.S. are bitten by dogs, and of the 800,000 Americans who receive medical attention for dog bites, at least half are children. Almost 1 in 5 people bitten by dogs require medical attention. Children are, by far, the most common victims of dog bites and are far more likely to be severely injured. Most dog bites affecting young children occur during everyday activities and while interacting with familiar dogs. Remember, as most dog bites involve familiar animals, prevention starts in your home.

Some species of dogs are more likely to bite unprovoked or when startled (Pit Bulls, Rotweillers, German Shepards, Huskies, etc). But this post really is intended to remind us that even when a sweet lamb-like doggy of ANY breed gets frightened or provoked by an unsuspecting human, toddler or child, they may bite without even THINKING of it. Some of this is just animal instinct.

7 Ways To Help Prevent Dog Bites:

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Join In On The Seattle Mama Doc Podcast?

Always a work in progress here — trying to think on ways to share new data, expert advice & enjoy the journey of parenthood. I’m excited to announce we’re going to pilot a Seattle Mama Doc Podcast early next month. Since this blog’s inception in 2009 we’ve covered nearly 650 standard blog posts, vlogs, guest contributors, interviews and now I’m going to test out a podcast. I am a huge fan of crowd sourcing and co-design, so will you help create the look, feel and content of the podcast alongside me? I would love to know what topics you’re interested in, which you’re tired of hearing about, who you want me to interview and frankly, anything else you’d like to share.

My hope is to interview experts and researchers here at Children’s, parents, and patients when there’s interest in sharing the experience of raising children. We’ll include the smarts of friends and peers across the country working on preventing and preventing illness while raising children. We’ll highlight all the tips and tools we learn along the way, new evidence, expert opinion and ideas to feel better about our decisions while raising our children.

I’ve recorded 3 options for the introduction of my podcast (I’m well aware of kind of bootleg smartphone audio quality for these little demos — promise to record high quality content in studio for the actual podcast).

Which resonates and makes you want to tune in?

Tell me what to cover. And also, would you want to join me on the podcast? SAY SO, PLEASE!

Option #1

 

Option #2

 

Option #3

 

Using Melatonin To Help Children Fall Asleep

When I recently shared this article on my Mama Doc Facebook about a “magic” children’s bedtime story promising to make the going-to-sleep process easier, many parents inquired about melatonin.

No question that supplemental melatonin has a role in children’s sleep dysfunction but also no question that parents are turning to melatonin out of a need for convenience. I’ve had COUNTLESS curbside consults from parents asking me if melatonin is safe to use in the short-term but also for years on end. The short answer is we don’t entirely know because studies just haven’t been done. Often when I get the story of how families are using melatonin, I end up advising changes in the sleep schedule more than a need for meds. What we do know: melatonin can help children fall asleep with sleep dysfunction, sleep dysfunction and inadequate sleep have serious health consequences, and although melatonin only helps with sleep initiation (falling asleep) it can be hugely beneficial for children who lie awake at night for hours at bedtime. The other thing we know: melatonin is not regulated like medicines (it’s overseen as a food supplement) that has been studied in very few pediatric populations so it’s difficult to generalize safety for children everywhere. Lots of definitions, dosing info, and pediatric sleep expertise below.

If your child can fall asleep in about 30 minutes after the lights are out (especially when you have made sure no screen time for 1-2 hours prior, no caffeine in afternoon) then melatonin is unnecessary.

If it were my child I’d use melatonin if sleep dysfunction at bedtime was getting in the way of necessary sleep, but I’d also do everything I could to get them off of it as soon as I could. Many children respond to the hypnotic effect of higher doses of melatonin, but many children are also given it for family convenience, too. In my experience, sometimes families use it to treat anxiety (those kids whose mind spins and spins and spins and worries) at bedtime. Although sometimes melatonin helps kids fall asleep, it’s just a band-aid.

Children are sleeping less than ever before and there are mounting impediments to a good night’s sleep (screens, early school start times, stimulants in the food source, busy school days and activities keeping kids up late). However inconvenient, I think sleep hygiene (routine bed time, no screens before bed, bed used only for sleeping) and consistency with what we do as parents may be the only magic wand to wave for sleep throughout childhood. Awakenings typically rise from all sorts of developmental milestones and changes as children grow. Overnight awakenings will always be normal although how our children get back to sleep on their own changes our night of sleep dramatically. When it comes to challenges falling asleep, sometimes melatonin can really help, especially in children with underlying autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit disorders, or children with shifted sleep schedules.

Only a few long-term studies have looked at prolonged use and associated effects, but most sleep specialists consider melatonin safe, particularly for occasional short-term use. The bigger question is why parents feel the need to give their child melatonin.  –Dr. Maida Chen

What is Melatonin?

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