Pregnancy

All Articles in the Category ‘Pregnancy’

How Genetic Technologies May Change How We Approach Parenthood

Seattle writer Bonnie Rochman has a new, smartypants book on genetic testing. It’s not a “how-to,” per se, rather a storytelling look and near confessional at how confusing it can feel when you’re pregnant (or plan to be) and faced with the marketplace of ideas and opportunities for knowing more from genetic testing. Simply put, she articulates the quandary nestled in the “to know” or “not to know” more about your expected baby, genetically speaking.

In the book (and the podcast and TV seg she joined me for —  included below) Bonnie talks of her own journey as a mom but also interviews researchers, geneticists, families, expecting parents, and ethicists along the way. It’s researched; the pages of notes and references at the end could overwhelm, if you let them. Thankfully, the book reads like a story and yet Bonnie doesn’t shy away from complex ethical spider webs like the implications (for some) in getting tested for fatal diseases and the option to enter the abortion debate. More than anything, Bonnie takes on the reality that when it comes to prenatal genetic testing, the tests themselves, the official guidance, and the technology itself is moving faster than our public and medical understanding…

Who you are and where you seek care may change what advice you get. She explains why.

When I did a Google search on prenatal genetic testing after I read the book and prepared for the podcast and TV seg, I was led to sites that didn’t necessary help me understand more about what I would want to know. I found general, outdated lists. As far as I know as a pediatrician, there isn’t one site that helps expecting parents understand just when and what to test for and why. Thankfully, we use our obstetricians, family docs, genetic counselors and pediatric specialists to help guide us to the best ones. But I enjoyed the way this book empowered me as a mom. That I could learn about the science, feel out my own philosophies, and embroider my own ethics into these kinds of decisions themselves.

The book doesn’t stay at the surface. Cutting truths in this sentiment from Dr. Arthur Caplan (incidentally one of my professors when I studied medical ethics) included in the book:

As the bioethicist Arthur Caplan has noted, genetic information is ‘exquisitely sensitive.’ Worrisome genetic test results can make people feel that ‘they harmed their children, or that they themselves are flawed. Most people don’t feel that way if their kidneys start working inefficiently. They don’t say, ‘I’m a flawed human being.’ But they feel that way about their genes.

Bonnie points out that we may make differing decisions from our neighbors and relatives, friends and peers at times when it comes to getting tested before, during, and after pregnancy. And it’s okay to make different decisions from one pregnancy or another (I did!).

Bonnie is a deft writer, having written about parenting and health for publications including The New York Times Magazine and The Wall Street Journal. I met her years back when she started to interview me for stories and I built up trust in the work she’s created. She is a former parenting columnist for Time.com and staff writer for Time magazine. The new book, The Gene Machine: How Genetic Technologies Are Changing the Way We Have Kids—And the Kids We Have is her most comprehensive look yetBonnie is a mom to 3 and has her own personal story about genetic testing that led her to write this book. It’s a tough subject to cover, fraught with political, religious and philosophical implications yet her tone stays neutral throughout. I pushed her to share learnings from all of this research and writing. A tiny peek at some ideas from the book and a few ideas from Bonnie herself:

Genetic Technologies Are Re-Shaping Parenthood

  • Carrier Screening: Testing that’s done to see whether you or your partner carry a genetic mutation that could cause a serious inherited disorder in your baby. Some of the more common disorders screened for include cystic fibrosis, sickle cell disease, thalassemia, and Tay-Sachs disease, but there are more than 100 others that can be tested for. More and more companies are promoting universal, expanded carrier screening of both parents.
  • Detecting Problems Prenatally: Noninvasive prenatal testing can now detect Down syndrome, the most common chromosomal condition, in the first trimester. These tests can be confusing to some expecting moms and partners and know that the names of the tests vary from clinic to clinic. SO if you’re chatting with a friend about a test know that what terms you’ve heard at one clinic may vary from what she hears. Some providers won’t offer some tests unless the mother is over 35 years of age (risk vs benefit plays a part here). Talk to your OBGYN and/or a genetic counselor about all your options and what they mean. Ask again if you don’t understand. It’s okay to opt-out and it’s okay to opt-in. Let your team (this includes your loved ones and your medical team) help you take your time when you have it.
  • Tests such as chromosomal microarray can find small deletions and duplications.

Sequencing Genomes Even Before Birth?

  • Bonnie reports several university medical centers are conducting research to explore whether it’s a good idea to sequence, or decode, the genome of every baby born in this country. It may be that in upcoming decades all babies will have the opportunity to be sequenced even before they are born. What we do with that information will likely change and change and change again.
  • If entire sequences are done more routinely, more diseases would be detected in our babies, but ethical dilemmas arise with what to do about that. Not just with the information but in terms of how much information to share with the parents. For example, should you tell parents that their infant daughter has a breast cancer mutation years before she’d develop breasts? Research is still unfolding as to what knowing these kinds of risks does to children and their parents. “Are the kids all right? When breast cancer runs in the family.”

Rochman on “How To Choose A Test”

  • It’s important to know what sort of person you are — do you seek out information? Or do you prefer to remain blissfully ignorant? If you are the kind of person who finds lots of information overwhelming, you may not want to take advantage of prenatal tests that can yield results that are uncertain or inconclusive.
  • It’s also important to carefully consider what you would do if you were to find out that your fetus has a problem. If you would continue the pregnancy no matter what, you may not want to have extensive prenatal testing.
  • Research has shown that knowing ahead of time about a diagnosis can help parents prepare emotionally and logistically for the birth of a child with special needs.
  • Feel confident in your choices on genetic testing, even if they may vary from one pregnancy to another.

Recommendations are changing all the time, in February 2017, after Bonnie’s book was published, The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) expanded its guidelines on carrier screening to include screening for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) as well as a complete blood count to assess risk of hemoglobinopathy.

5 Reasons Parents May Consider Opting For Prenatal Testing

Bonnie simplifies things here for those who may want to do a lot of testing:

  • You are an eyes-wide-open kind of person who likes gathering lots of information.
  • You don’t like surprises.
  • You are open to test results changing the course of your prenatal care.
  • You want peace of mind – at any cost.
  • You have a tolerance for risk and uncertainty.

You can learn more about genetic testing and Bonnie’s book by listening to our Seattle Mama Doc podcast. To buy The Gene Machine: How Genetic Technologies Are Changing the Way We Have Kids – And the Kids We Have visit www.bonnierochman.com or Amazon.com. You can also read Bonnie’s recent article on Slate.com called What Kind of Baby Do You Want?

 

New Zika Advice: Sex And Ways To Protect Yourself

Zika Test Tube

I’ll continue to monitor and track Zika news to share with you as I learn about it. My inboxes keep filling up with Zika questions even though I think the risks to our families, if you’re not pregnant or not thinking of getting pregnant, is low. That being said, if you’re thinking of having a baby now or in the next 6 months or if you are not using contraception and are sexually active, listen up.

Last Friday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) presented new guidelines for preventing the sexual transmission of the Zika virus. The news and recommendations regarding transmission and our behavior is evolving and changing rapidly as researchers, doctors and medical experts learn more about Zika. This science is not complete, but these guidelines best attempt to keep our population the safest it can be with the information we have. Here is a short rundown on the new guidelines.

New CDC Updates And Reminders About Zika:

Number one reason for this is that although daytime-biting mosquitos are the primary transmission of Zika virus (in areas with Zika — click here for info and world maps) sexual transmission of Zika has been documented here in the United States after travel/exposure —> infection). As of March 23rd, of the 273 travel-associated Zika infections documented in the US, 19 cases are in pregnant women and 6 were sexually transmitted.

The below info helps shape ways to protect yourself:

  • WOMEN: If a woman has been diagnosed with Zika (or has symptoms of Zika after possible exposure) it’s recommended she wait at least 8 weeks after her symptoms first appear before trying to get pregnant. As a reminder, symptoms of Zika include rash, red eyes, joint aches, overall feeling of being unwell. Secondary reminder, and one that makes this advice a bit of a challenge to interpret, only 1 in 5 who get Zika virus will have symptoms in the first place. Therefore, if we want to be really careful consider this: if you’ve traveled to a Zika-affected area you may want to wait 8 weeks after returning home before attempting to get pregnant, with or without symptoms.
  • MEN: If a man has been diagnosed with Zika (or has symptoms of the illness), he should wait at least 6 months from those first signs of the illness before having unprotected sex. This recommendation comes off news that the virus has been found live in semen 62 days. The 6 months is a conservative calculation.The CDC took the longest known risk period (about 2 months) and then multiplied that by 3 for conservative recommendations to ensure no transmission.
  • MEN WHO TRAVEL AND HAVE PREGNANT PARTNERS: Men who travel to areas with Zika outbreaks need to prevent transmission to pregnant partners for the rest of the pregnancy. CDC recommends: “Men who have traveled to or reside in an area with active Zika virus transmission and their pregnant sex partners should consistently and correctly use condoms during sex (i.e., vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, or fellatio) or abstain from sex for the duration of the pregnancy. This course is the best way to avoid even a minimal risk of sexual transmission of Zika virus, which could have adverse fetal effects when contracted during pregnancy. Pregnant women should discuss their male sex partner’s history of travel to areas with active Zika virus transmission and history of illness consistent with Zika virus disease with their health care provider; providers can consult CDC’s guidance for evaluation and testing of pregnant women
  • The CDC is NOT recommending that that men and women living in Zika-affected regions postpone pregnancy all-together like other countries (think Ecuador).
  • Infectious Disease experts feel that a Zika virus infection in a woman who is not pregnant would not pose a risk for birth defects in future pregnancies after the virus has cleared from her blood (roughly about a week after infection is over).
  • They have also updated their Question/Answer page that is chalk full of helpful information.

Blood Testing For Suspected Zika Virus:

For Men, at this time, CDC advises that testing of exposed, asymptomatic men (men with no Zika symptoms but who have traveled) for the purpose of assessing risk for sexual transmission is not recommended.

For men and for women, regardless of pregnancy status, get tested if you develop two or more of the following symptoms during or within two weeks of travel to an area of active Zika virus transmission OR within two weeks of unprotected sex with a man who tested positive for Zika virus or had symptoms of Zika infection during or within two weeks of return from travel to an area with Zika transmission: Read full post »

Zika, Dengue And Mosquitoes: Info For Women And Men Who Want Babies

zika cdc infographic

Image c/o CDC

 

Zika virus scares continue to worry expecting parents and pregnant moms. In addition, we’re now just learning about a state of emergency in the big island of Hawaii because of the rising cases of Dengue virus, a virus also transmitted by mosquitoes. Shifting lifestyle advice for growing families will continue as researchers and public health officials learn more. We should expect that the recommendations for travel will change and evolve this summer. As of today, news reports from Brazil coupled with public health officials new knowledge and evolving medical research from around The Americas has clarified a number of things for pregnant moms and families thinking about having babies. Some things we DO know:

  • What is Zika: Zika virus is predominately spread by mosquitoes. It is a virus causing joint aches, red eyes, rash and overall yuck feelings in about 1 in 5 people who get it. Typically the virus causes mild symptoms and goes away on its own even in the minority of people who have symptoms. The virus typically clears the blood stream a week after symptoms show up but we know it can remain for longer periods in other bodily fluids (urine, semen). Zika has been around for decades but warmer climate and travel has spread the mosquitoes and the virus around the world. Then it caused a massive outbreak in Brazil (over a million people estimated to have had the virus). During the same period a surge in cases of birth defects worried health officials about a possible connection of serious side effects from the virus during fetal development.
  • zika map voxWhere is Zika: Outbreaks of Zika have been reported in over 30 countries, including some cases (not outbreaks) in the United States. Zika is often found in small pockets of countries who have reported cases (costal areas, low-lying areas with standing water) and not ubiquitously throughout the entire landscape. It’s not a risk everywhere you go in Central America but it has touched every country. Further, even though we expect to have cases of Zika in most parts of the US over the upcoming months, you’re simply not likely to get Zika in most parts of the United States for a few reasons: mosquitoes that carry and transmit Zika typically only live in the gulf coast and Southeastern US, our measures to control mosquitoes in the US are effective, and many of us who live in warm climates where mosquitoes live spend the majority of the day in air-conditioning and have access to repellent if outside.OUTBREAKS ARE NOT EXPECTED here in the US but we certainly have no guarantee. Here is a nice infographic from Vox depicting the distribution of mosquitoes who can potentially transmit Zika in the US.
  • Birth defects from Zika: The long-term effects from Zika remain unknown, however there are serious concerns about Zika virus and the association of a constellation of symptoms on developing babies, specifically life-altering brain and neurologic changes (microcephaly and developmental delays & changes in the eye). More evidence connecting Zika as the culprit has unfolded in recent weeks. Zika has been found in the brains of babies with microcephaly, it’s been found in the placenta of women who have miscarried, and it’s been found in affected babies eyes. These findings don’t yet prove a cause-and-effect relationship between Zika and these defects but it is more data to construct the case. It is unknown exactly how Zika could cause such devastating changes to a developing baby (for example, researchers cannot yet prove that it’s the virus itself versus our own immune response to the virus that causes devastating side effects in developing babies).

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Women Who Want Babies: Alcohol And Advice

pregnant belly FASThere’s a swirl of media and pithy opinions that pertain to women of child-bearing age this week that have come off as fairly oppressive. You’ve heard the news — this is about Zika and this is also about alcohol. First, there’s a new report out of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) that stitches truths about unplanned pregnancy, alcohol use in child-bearing years and offers advice that has lit women and the blogosphere aflame. The CDC’s goal is valiant: inform women about risks alcohol has on developing fetuses, remind the public that nearly 1/2 pregnancies are unplanned and remind women to make “good choices.” On top of this, women of child-bearing age have been told that not only can we not take a trip to Mexico or Central America while pregnant because of risks from Zika, we learned earlier this week that we can’t have unprotected sex with our partners while pregnant if there is any chance of an exposure to the virus. Women planning on getting pregnant should also take precautions. As a reminder, Zika is a somewhat silent infection (only 1 in 5 who get it have symptoms) so the risk criteria is just based on where you go and where you’re exposed. If we women get the Zika virus while we’re pregnant or at the time of delivery, our babies can have devastating side effects. So the threat can feel very real.

Ooofdah.

Something that has to be said: public health recommendations in keeping families healthy will at times differ for men and women. It’s just the way it’s gonna be because of our differing roles in making and raising children. Nonetheless, I’m here to say I think the advice and the news this past week has felt like a big ton of bricks. Advice has felt unrealistic, sexist, and oppressive by many even though it’s based in smart public health data. For the first time in my life I’m relieved that I’m not thinking about having another baby. I mean it’s just a lot to toss around. That being said: IT’S A WONDERFUL TIME to have a baby. Let me do my best to frame up the alcohol conversation as a mom, feminist, pediatrician and health advocate. The updated recommendations/precautions on Zika will be in my next post:

Pregnancy, Women Who Can Get Pregnant, And Alcohol:

In the report’s summation, it advises women who 1) ARE pregnant or who 2) are TRYING to become pregnant to refrain from drinking. Pretty standard. It’s group #3, the group that MIGHT become pregnant causing a bit of unease. The report recommends that women who MIGHT become pregnant (capable of becoming pregnant) unintentionally & who consume alcohol, to either refrain from drinking altogether or use contraception. This includes women of child-bearing age (15 to 44) who are drinking, having sex, and not using birth control – roughly 3.3 million based on the CDC report. According to a study in 2011, we learned that about half of all US pregnancies are unplanned and, even if planned, most women do not know they are pregnant until they are 4-6 weeks into the pregnancy. Read full post »

Zika Virus And Pregnant Moms

mosquitoIt’s January, 2016. News stories have inspired significant anxiety about Zika virus. It’s a scary topic because news about the outbreaks are just unfolding and this affects an already anxious group, PREGNANT mamas and expecting families. I want to share with you real time information and data to try to alleviate anxiety and educate the best I can. I suspect with time some of this will change. I’ve curated the most common questions and answers directly from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) below. The most alarming information coming from these outbreaks are the effects of Zika on pregnant women and their babies. First things first, Zika virus will only affect an unborn baby who is exposed to Zika in utero if mom is infected WHILE she is pregnant. Meaning, women not pregnant who get Zika can have Zika virus, clear the virus from her bloodstream (typically about 1 week after illness resolves) and not transmit Zika to future babies. If you are pregnant, there is no question it makes sense to think carefully about travel. That babymoon just can’t be the priority if it will put you at risk. Zika is potentially dangerous to a baby during any trimester or pregnancy or at the time of delivery.

Zika virus is unusual in a couple ways: only 20% of people who get it know it — meaning most people infected won’t develop any symptoms. Secondly, we don’t have a vaccine and we don’t yet have an anti-viral to protect pregnant moms and their babies from side effects. So, unlike infections caused by influenza and polio, or rubella or mumps, we have to change our social determinants of health — basically pregnant moms have to take precautions with where they go and how they expose themselves. I’ve found this CDC Q/A extremely helpful.

What Is Zika Virus Disease?

CDC: “Zika is a disease caused by Zika virus that is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito. The most common symptoms of Zika are fever, rash, joint pain, and conjunctivitis (red eyes). The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting for several days to a week.”

Like mosquitoes all over the world, the mosquitoes that carry the virus and spread it to people breed in open ponds/pools of water. The ones that carry Zika tend to bite and infect primates and humans during the day. These little buggers can get the virus from an infected person and then bite another person and transmit it during outbreaks.

What Are The Symptoms Of Zika?

CDC: “About one in five people infected with Zika will get sick — symptoms from being ill. For people who get sick, the illness is usually mild. For this reason, many people might not realize they have been infected. The most common symptoms of Zika virus disease are fever, rash, joint pain, or conjunctivitis (red eyes). Symptoms typically begin 2 to 7 days after being bitten by an infected mosquito.”

Remember, 80% of people who get Zika won’t have any symptoms. So heading off to a country with an outbreak and coming home feeling fine doesn’t ensure you haven’t been exposed. This is key in protecting those at risk. We can’t make a lot of assumptions of who has it and who doesn’t.

How Is Zika Transmitted?

CDC: “Zika is primarily transmitted through the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes. Aedes mosquitoes, which spread the virus, live in every Western hemisphere country but Canada and Chile. It can also be transmitted from a pregnant mother to her baby during pregnancy or around the time of birth. We do not know how often Zika is transmitted from mother to baby during pregnancy or around the time of birth.”

Research will likely evolve through these outbreaks. What we know is that unborn babies are at most risk for serious complications. They are dependent on their moms making great decisions during pregnancy. Holy moly, it’s always a lot of pressure but this sure is another one for us to bear.

More on who is at risk, what to do if you’re planning a trip to Mexico for a babymoon, and ways to prevent getting Zika:

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What To Know About Baby Teeth

Image courtesy: American Dental Association

Image courtesy: American Dental Association

Things have changed over the past couple of years regarding how to care for baby teeth. Official recommendations for fluoridated toothpaste begin with the very first sighting of the very first tooth. This is news to many.

What we do early in our child’s life can have lasting consequences. Some quick reminders for new parents, grandparents and anyone out there lucky enough to be hanging out with an infant. Keep their mouth delicious!

5 Things Every Parent Needs To Know About Baby Teeth

  1. Use fluoridated toothpaste at tooth eruption. The minute those baby teeth come in consider it the start of the lifelong brushing habit for your baby. Brushing and rinsing the teeth after breastfeeding or formula, solid meals or snacks will always be recommended.  In minimum, build brushing into everyday, ideally morning and night, with a tiny amount of fluoridated child toothpaste (see image above). This may be most important after the last evening feeding.
  2. Tap water! Brush with tap water twice a day and provide tap water for your infants and children when serving water. After you brush teeth DON’T RINSE with water. Let the tiny amount of fluoride from the brushing sit on the teeth as long as possible to prevent decay.
  3. Use the right amount of toothpaste (image above). This provides protection from bacteria and acid but also avoids concern for too much toothpaste.
    1. < 3 years of age – rice sized smear of toothpaste on the brush.
    2. > 3 years (including adults) pea sized amount of toothpaste is all you need on your brush once you know how to spit.
    3. Don’t rinse after brushing.
  4. Timing: Most infants and toddlers, preschoolers and young children can brush their teeth and tongue in about 1 minute — goal really is to brush at the gumline on all sides of each tooth, paying special attention to back teeth, molars, and lower teeth where bacteria love to reside. For older children, teens and adults the rule of thumb is typically 2 minutes of brush time to brush teeth, tongue and rid mouth of dragon breath!
  5. Bacteria: Baby teeth enamel is thinner than adult (secondary) teeth so the mix of sugar and bacteria in the mouth must be deterred. We unfortunately transfer oral bacteria to babies when we share utensils, kiss them, clean their pacifiers with our mouths (don’t do it!), and drink from shared cups. If you have a history of lots of cavities the American Academy of Pediatrics’ new policy says, “Parents/caregivers, especially those with significant history of dental decay, should be cautioned to avoid sharing with their child items that have been in their own mouths.” I’m all for smooching babies so I say this: get to the dentist yourself to make sure your mouth is in tip-top shape to avoid some bad transfers…

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Power Of A Kiss And Family Oral Health

Image courtesy: American Dental Association

Image courtesy: American Dental Association

Oral health doesn’t start and end with the dentist. Times are changing as the Washington Dental Service Foundation has trained 1,600 pediatricians and family physicians throughout the state on the importance of oral hygiene in young children. Pediatricians are now applying fluoride during well-child check-ups and counseling families more comprehensively on how to prevent dental decay while also referring to dentists for prevention and acute dental problems. Just last month I attended the 1-1/2 hour oral health training with a pediatric dentist. That learning coupled with a new policy statement from The American Academy of Pediatrics highlighting the importance of oral health inspired me to get the word out. I suspect we can all do a bit better protecting our children’s mouths. Recommendations for fluoridated toothpaste have recently changed (use it with the very first baby tooth!) as has knowledge and reminders about how we share our bacteria with our children. What we do for our mouth may have direct effects on our children’s.

The Most Common Chronic Childhood Disease

  • The facts about oral health in children are a little surprising. By their first birthday 8% of toddlers have cavities in their mouth and the Pediatrics policy detailed 24% 2-4 year-olds, 53% 6-8 year-olds and 56% 15 year-olds also have dental disease. Since oral health (even in babies and toddlers) is an integral part of overall health of children this is problematic. Dental disease has strong links between diabetes, respiratory infections and heart disease. The numbers for children with dental disease are high (!!) which makes dental disease the most common infection of childhood.
  • Good news is much of this disease can be prevented (or corrected) and because infants and young children see the pediatrician more frequently than the dentist, it’s becoming clear that pediatricians need to hone skills on oral health, the disease process, prevention and dentist interventions when necessary.

4 Things I Learned About Oral Health

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Boring, Bare, Basic: Keep The Crib Safe

bare, boring,  basicWe’ve known for several years that a crowded bed and a decorated crib (pillows, quilts, stuffed animals, bumpers) can put babies at risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and unintentional sleep-related suffocation. Boring, bare and basic beds are still best for babies. Tell every mother, father and grandparent to an infant you know. A Pediatrics study out today shows hazardous, soft bedding is still being used by as many as 50% of US parents despite years of public health messages urging the opposite. I see where these numbers come from– we parents love to dote on our babies. We instinctively provide warmth and coziness to our babies all day so images of abundant bedding at nighttime can look divine. Further, our families (mothers or mothers-in-law!), coworkers and neighbors may encourage soft bedding because of old habits; many feel warmer bedding is better. However when it comes to the crib, our instincts may deter us from providing the safest sleep. As friends, parents, relatives and co-workers we have to support new parents in creating a basic, boring, and bare crib. Our responsibility extends from our own home to the workplace and to our neighborhood — what we buy and hand-down for that baby showers matters! The study out today reminds us we have lots of work to do, especially as data finds some groups of parents may be at more risk for using the soft stuff…

Soft Bedding Increases Risk

Several studies around the world dating back to the 1990’s have found SIDS risk increases with soft, loose bedding. This includes blankets, pillows, stuffed animals, quilts and similar materials either covering/on top of or underneath the infant. Read more about risk modes for SIDS, and why I hate sleep positioners. What we know: data in the early 1990’s was so compelling that in 1996 the AAP began recommending that infants sleep in firm, stark bedding environments on their back. The great news is that parents took notice of the “back to sleep” campaign and there was a sharp decline in the use of bedding in the 1990’s. Between 200-2010 the progress slowed. More from the study about moms and babies at risk: Read full post »

Baby Talk: How Moms And Dads May Differ

baby talk photo edited

There may be a stereotype that women talk more than men; the language environment in which we’re raised, starting at day one, may have influence on this. Whether or not women are chattier than men is due largely in part to the context of the conversation. But a new study published in Pediatrics shows when it comes to parents talking to their babies, the term “Chatty Cathy” probably rings truer than “Chatty Carl.” And this has the potential to change the game with your child as they age. It’s well founded that the number of words your baby/child hears in the first few years of life has dramatic impact on their vocabulary, school success and education for a lifetime. Parent-talk has more impact on a child’s IQ and vocabulary than their education or socioeconomic status. Who we are as talkers really changes our babies’ lives.

Gender Differences In “Baby-Talk” And “Parent-Talk”

The Pediatrics study out this week evaluated the intersection of both baby-talk (comparing preterm and term baby boys and girls vocalizations for 16 hours at a time) and parent-talk (comparing Moms’ to Dads’ vocalizations to their infants) at birth, at about a month of age (based on original due date), and at 7 months of age. More than 1500 hours of recordings (derived from little devices worn on babies’ vests) were analyzed to compare family language interactions. Babies in families with a Mom and Dad at home were included (no same-sex couples). About ½ of the babies were late preemies (note: 1/4 of all the babies studied had a stay in the NICU) and 1/3 of families were raising children in a bilingual home. I found three key takeaways: Read full post »

Perhaps Not Intuitive? Car Seat Use From Day One

car seatNew data presented at the recent American Academy of Pediatrics meeting found 93% of parents to newborns incorrectly positioned and buckled their infants into their car seat on their first trip home. A little more proof that perfectly buckling a car seat isn’t an innate early-parenting skill! Even Prince George’s royal family didn’t get it right. I’m certain I didn’t do this perfectly either on our maiden voyage home (I remember using a zip-in blanket in the seat) nearly 8 years ago. As The Car Seat Lady reminds, “products that have a layer that goes under the baby’s body can make the baby unsafe. This is true even if the product is designed with slots for the harness straps to fit through.” Most of us clearly mess this up and although the first trip is just one trip, it may be emblematic of our everyday use.

Car seats and booster seats are important for child safety; our habits for their use begin the moment we leave the hospital or birthing center. Although those “bucket” infant car seats are safest (we’d all be safer in the car facing the rear, and in a bucket) we move away from them when our infants are around 9-12 months of age. But do remember, with every graduation to a new seat, you decrease protection. For example, when you move from a a rear-facing infant seat —> rear-facing carseat—>forward-facing carseat—>booster seat—>seat belt—>front seat at age 13,  each time you advance the child safety seat, you’re decreasing protection you provide. Don’t rush the transition! Keep your child rear-facing until at least age 2 years and in a booster until they are at least 4 foot 9 inches (57 inches) tall.

The No-Duh Importance Of Car Seats

  • Car crashes are the leading cause of death for children in the US. Creating safe habits from day one matters…don’t blow off importance of car seat safety as helicopter parenting. Using the child car seat well every time is an easy way to layer protection and channel your bursting baby love.
  • Infant car seats, rear-facing seats and boosters all hold equal import. Only two states require car or booster seats until age 8 (WA is not one of them) even though children should be in booster seats until they are both 4 foot 9 inches and between age 8 and 12 years.
  •  Car seats reduce risk of death by 71% for infants and 54% for toddlers if used properly: “Results of several studies have indicated that misused child safety seats may increase a child’s risk of serious injury in a crash.” (Page 9)

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