School Age

All Articles in the Category ‘School Age’

Head Lice, School, And OTC Treatment

Raise your hand if you never had head lice before going to college. Your hand isn’t in the air, is it? Turns out, lice is common. And no question, it’s wildly unsettling for us all. It’s a new world when it comes to prevention and treatment though — more choice, less stigma and less school disruption. Twentieth-century lice care is no more.

Back in 2010 the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) updated its recommendations on lice. Basically, schools are no longer encouraged to send children home with lice or keep them away from school. Lice spreads from child to child but it’s certainly nothing like measles. Sending children home from school for a “non-health issue” doesn’t make sense. Further, lice can be living on your child’s head for up to 30 days without hatching (horrifying I know) and can be around for weeks before causing itching the first time around so an urgent send-the-lice-infested-kid-home policy just doesn’t make a lot of sense. Thing is, this changes the game. We all want to get rid of lice on our child’s head immediately, but we’re dependent on all the other families in school doing the same so we don’t get it AGAIN…

In the midst of a lice “crisis,” don’t beat yourself up. This has nothing to do with hygiene. It has more to do with bad luck.

“Head lice are not a health hazard or a sign of poor hygiene and, in contrast to body lice, are not responsible for the spread of any disease.” American Academy of Pediatrics

KYOTC Lice 1New 2015 guidelines from the AAP offer some tips for getting your family lice-free as quickly as possible. Lots of over-the-counter (OTC) ways to deal with it. OTC treatments are safe and effective. However, lice are tricky and have been found to have resistance patterns that aren’t entirely understood at this point (the prevalence is unknown)– so rarely a parent needs to switch treatments. That means sometimes we do all the right things and even with the BEST routine and adherence and lice possibly remain. If you suspect you’re not getting rid of lice at home despite great treatment routines, involve your pediatrician. Often ongoing lice is simply that your child is getting re-infested at school or sports. Or they weren’t gone in the first place.

Follow instructions on the bottle — many treatments need to be repeated about 7-10 days after first application.

Sometimes it may be that you need to swap treatments. It’s RARE that you need a prescription treatment. Your child’s clinician can help recommend a transition to prescription medications. The prescription meds are expensive and often unnecessary but one does have the benefit of requiring only a one-time treatment and no combing.

If the thought of chemicals of any kind on your family’s skin is unappealing, manual removal by “wet-combing” or suffocation through hair is acceptable and can sometimes be effective (things like mayonnaise, butter, oils) yet there is no real hard data about effectiveness. It’s important to note that wet-combing should be repeated once a week for at least three weeks if you do this to ensure all lice and nits are removed as you must comb through entire scalp and hair fastidiously.

Discovering lice is clearly in the no-fun parenting category, but it’s also NO BIG DEAL. From experience (x 2) I can say best thing we can do is calm down, head to the drug store, comb away, wash the linens and move on.

What Parents Need To Know

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How To Read OTC Medication Labels

reading labels 1Reading and familiarizing yourself with the drug facts label is perhaps more important than it seems before you administer an over-the-counter (OTC) medicine to your children. I think we may get more hands-off at times than is ideal. And I think caregivers who casually help us with our children (grandparents, babysitters, nannies, neighbors) can too. Although it’s inconvenient to fill out forms for medicine administration in daycare, preschool and school, these locations seem to be the environments with the most safety around OTC medicine delivery. Those forms help remind us how important this stuff can be.

With little ones and children all heading back to school, as parents we know it’s time to buckle down and get ready for the shift in schedules and in illness that comes with onslaught of viruses that come with preschoolers and elementary-aged kids back in the classroom. Before the inevitable fall, wintery illnesses resume, it’s a great time to set aside some time to really learn how to read the drug label and learn the ingredients, why or if it’s safe for a child the ages of your kids, why the inactive ingredients matter, etc. In some ways it’s combination medicines that make me worry the most.  Read full post »

It’s Gotta Be Screen Time Somewhere

Illustration by David Rosenman

Illustration by David Rosenman

My boys always want it to be screen time. I don’t think that is changing anytime soon. These apps, shows, games, and devices are only getting smarter at capturing their attention.

It feels like there isn’t a giant list of new advice to share regarding “screen time.” But because of the recent media focus and deluge of content on “screen addiction,” coupled with recommendations for dealing with screens while parenting this summer, I’m here with a few responses and observations. It seems to me, parents (all of us) are looking for a couple of things in the content we read about parenting with screens: permission and hacks for simplicity. This post will perhaps offer neither. Until the end.

Most of us acknowledge that not all screens are the same, nor is all programming, nor are the stages of life where apps and screens are enjoyed (infants versus an 8 year-old). “Screen time” is an issue layered with complexity. Parenting during this explosive device development era demands simple rules and dictums for limiting their use help, but the rules by themselves limit the development of full-on zealots. No one follows the rules like religion. Parents, grandparents and caregivers aren’t devout to recommendations because we claim the rules just don’t fit into the context of our lives. Most of us figure out a way to make justifiable exceptions. It’s simply too easy to pull out your phone, especially when it delights your child the way it does, and entertain. But no question that with the rules out there stressing non-use and limits, we’re left feeling a little guilty anytime we left our children indulge. Imagine knowing that screens before bed interfere with the “sleep hormone” melatonin (the light emitted from the screen limits secretion) but even so still choosing to let your children “chill out” with a video for a 1/2 hour before bed each night. Or imagine following the no-screen-time-before-age 2 religiously for your first child but then breaking this rule routinely when you have a second one! This just happens all the time. Read Why No TV Before Bed Is Better. Read full post »

Hot Days: Why Children Are At Particular Risk

Hiking on a hot dayEven here in the cool Pacific Northwest the summer months can send temperatures soaring into the 80’s, 90’s and 100’s. Hot for any average adult, but potentially even more dangerous for young children. Our country is currently experiencing rolling heat waves. Thing is, children heat up faster than adults (five times faster) because they have fewer sweat glands, their body-to-surface ratio is different (their sweating would never do as much good) and this combination makes it more difficult for children to regulate internal temperatures. Couple this physiology with children’s inability to tell us they’re HOT (infants/toddlers) or the instincts of a child or teen athlete (who may not know limits or want to regulate activity) and it can sometimes lead to overheating.

Heat is different for children than adults. They are at particular risk for two reasons: their dependency and their judgment.

Frankly, I worry most about children being left or trapped in hot cars this time of year. Ten children have already died this year in the U.S. after being trapped in a car that can heat up like a cooking oven. Yesterday, with millions of Americans on heat advisories, NBC national news showed footage of bystanders this week breaking glass to save a child left in a hot car. Even though everyone seems to believe it won’t happen to them, about 3 dozen children die each year (primarily during the summer) after getting forgotten or trapped in a car that heats up. If you think you’re too smart for it to happen to you or your family read this — a piece I’ve called the most devastating article around. Read full post »

School Is Out, Head Lice May Still Be Around

Head LiceThey’re a little gross, somewhat annoying and for most parents, inevitable. It also seems to me that for most of us they show up at the most inconvenient times. I’m talking about lice. With school coming to an end this month, you may think your child’s chances of picking up the little bugs will diminish. Unfortunately, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) most cases of lice occur outside school. Between summer camp, sports and play dates there are still plenty of opportunities for lice to take shelter on the head of at least one family member. They’re certainly no picnic to deal with and they can also be unwittingly contagious during the school years. Clearly there’s nothing to be ashamed of when discovering lice but it doesn’t always feel that way. New guidelines from the AAP out last month offer some tips for getting your family lice-free as quickly as possible. Acting fast with a plan often diminishes all sorts of anxiety and discomfort for all. Read full post »

What To Do If Your Child Is Drowning: School-Age & Teens

6-2 boy swimmingThis is part two of the “What To Do If Your Child Is Drowning” series. Read about infants/toddlers here.

The purpose of these posts is to find out what you should do if you realize your child is actually drowning or struggling in the water rather than repeat the warnings of how to prevent it. I want to put a couple thoughts and tools in your hands to know WHAT to do if faced with an emergency.

Dr. Linda Quan, an emergency attending physician and drowning expert at Seattle Children’s shares information on what to do if you come upon a school-age child or teenager who is drowning. Preparing for this can help boost awareness and response if ever you support or discover a child in need for rescue. Read full post »

Allergies Run In The Family

It’s a gorgeous time of year when things are abloom. Many of us suffer from irritation and allergies to these months as pollens and particles float around and trigger allergic response.  Not so beautiful when our families (over)react to pollen. Thing is, there’s also the fact that cold season isn’t quite over and the exact cause of that runny nose your child is dealing with may be hard to decipher. One hint that it’s allergies and not a cold: do you, your spouse or any of your other children suffer from seasonal allergies? Unfortunately if so, there’s a 25% chance your child will too. That said, the likelihood more than doubles when both parents deal with allergies on a seasonal basis. Watch the video above for tips on telling the difference between hay fever & the common cold and when to be on the lookout for the former. Read full post »

Power Of A Kiss And Family Oral Health

Image courtesy: American Dental Association

Image courtesy: American Dental Association

Oral health doesn’t start and end with the dentist. Times are changing as the Washington Dental Service Foundation has trained 1,600 pediatricians and family physicians throughout the state on the importance of oral hygiene in young children. Pediatricians are now applying fluoride during well-child check-ups and counseling families more comprehensively on how to prevent dental decay while also referring to dentists for prevention and acute dental problems. Just last month I attended the 1-1/2 hour oral health training with a pediatric dentist. That learning coupled with a new policy statement from The American Academy of Pediatrics highlighting the importance of oral health inspired me to get the word out. I suspect we can all do a bit better protecting our children’s mouths. Recommendations for fluoridated toothpaste have recently changed (use it with the very first baby tooth!) as has knowledge and reminders about how we share our bacteria with our children. What we do for our mouth may have direct effects on our children’s.

The Most Common Chronic Childhood Disease

  • The facts about oral health in children are a little surprising. By their first birthday 8% of toddlers have cavities in their mouth and the Pediatrics policy detailed 24% 2-4 year-olds, 53% 6-8 year-olds and 56% 15 year-olds also have dental disease. Since oral health (even in babies and toddlers) is an integral part of overall health of children this is problematic. Dental disease has strong links between diabetes, respiratory infections and heart disease. The numbers for children with dental disease are high (!!) which makes dental disease the most common infection of childhood.
  • Good news is much of this disease can be prevented (or corrected) and because infants and young children see the pediatrician more frequently than the dentist, it’s becoming clear that pediatricians need to hone skills on oral health, the disease process, prevention and dentist interventions when necessary.

4 Things I Learned About Oral Health

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Enterovirus D68 And Some Old Reminders

girl in mask (1)Widespread news coverage over the last 24 hours has heightened concerns by many parents about a severe-symptom viral infection causing respiratory illness in children, predominately in the Midwest. Over the last month there has been a dramatic up-spike in children hospitalized with severe cold symptoms and wheezing. The virus isn’t new, but its effect on children seems to be. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has confirmed tests on children both in Kansas City and Chicago pinpointing the triggering virus as enterovirus D68. The biggest burden of illness has been in the Kansas City and Chicago areas where dozens of children were hospitalized daily, but there are reports of infections documented in about 10 additional states to date. The CDC report issued yesterday detailed data from their investigations

Of the tested and confirmed cases from Kansas City, their ages ranged from 6 weeks to 16 years, with a median of 4 years. Nearly 70 percent of patients had a previous history of asthma or wheezing. Of the Chicago group, ages ranged from 20 months to 15 years with a median of 5 years. Nearly three-quarters had a history of asthma or wheezing.

No question the illness has taken many by surprise as it’s an unusual time of year to see huge numbers of children with cold symptoms with severe wheezing. In areas where the infections started to pop up, schools been in session for a month or more so kids have been doing what they do best, playing in close contact and exchanging germs… Read full post »

Shifting To An Ideal Bedtime For School

We know children are sleeping less now than they did 30 years ago. Our children are unfortunately more tired and can suffer side effects in life because of it. Studies show that school-age children who create a sleep debt (chronic sleep deprivation) and are chronically tired have a more difficult time completing school work, they don’t score as well on tests, they may be more distractible, they can have difficulty maintaining attention, and they may be at higher risk for having an unhealthy weight. Even if your kids have already started school, you can provide a boost for your child’s attention, mood, and health by focusing in on sleep.

Starting out the year with better habits can help everyone at home (ahem, wouldn’t it be nice to avoid late evening battles?). If you’re not already there, think about moving to ideal bedtimes during the next couple of weeks.

How Much Sleep Do Children Need?

Sleep debt is created when we don’t sleep enough — it causes kids to crave “catch-up” sleep like those after-school naps, sleeping in until noon on the weekends, or falling asleep in the carpool on the way home. That being said, each child’s sleep need can be a bit different but in general children need:

  1. sleep needsPreschoolers: 11-12 hours of total sleep
  2. School-age children: 10-11 hours total sleep
  3. 12 year-old to teens: 8 1/2-10 hours total sleep

5 Ways To Support Good Sleep

  • Keep to an 8pm bedtime for young children. Move bedtime back slowly (move it by 30 minutes every 3-5 days) to prime your child for success and avoid battles!
  • 10pm bedtime for children age 12 & up is age-appropriate. More info here.
  • Habits: No screens 1-2 hours prior to bed, no caffeine after school, no food right before bed.
  • Exercise or move 30-60 minutes a day to help kids sleep easier
  • No sleeping with cell phones (create a docking station in the kitchen)
  • Don’t use OTC medications (cough & cold, for example) to knock your kids out and get them to sleep. Using medications that have a side effect of drowsiness can cause sleepiness to extend into daytime which can negatively affect school and sports performance.

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