Seattle Mama Doc 101

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Preventing Scald Burns: Mama Doc 101

Scald burns are common injuries for young children that arise when our skin or our mouths and mucus membranes have contact with burning hot liquids or steam. Children under age 5 account for nearly 1 in every 5 burn victims each year in the United States. The bathroom and kitchen are the typical danger zones. Many burns come from liquids heated in the microwave but children are also commonly burned from scalding liquids or water heated on the stove or in the shower or tub. The video details ways to protect your children (and family) from a terrible burn. Fortunately, you can improve your child’s safety in a matter of seconds: today, turn your water heater down to 120 degrees Fahrenheit.

Preventing Scald Burns in Children

Be protective of young children around hot liquids from day one. Never carry hot tea or coffee while holding your baby. Insist on the same from anyone who has the privilege of holding your baby.  I’ve taken care of infants with severe burns and plenty of older children. Severe burns are not only extremely painful and onerously traumatic, they can lead to serious health complications and lasting disfigurement. Now is the time to protect your child.

Why Burn Doctors Hate Instant Soup

Safe Kids Fact Sheet

Home Safety Council Handout

What Is A Foreskin? Mama Doc 101

Caring for your son’s foreskin is pretty much a hands-off job. But knowing what is normal and how your son’s foreskin develops and changes over time is essential for every parent to a boy with an uncircumcised penis.

In the beginning, during infancy, your son’s uncircumcised penis needs no special care. The foreskin is a piece of skin overlying the outside of your son’s penis. You never need to pull the foreskin back or detach it in any way. You clean it just like any other skin surface on his body.

Over the first 5 + years of your son’s life, the foreskin will gradually “retract” or pull away from the head of his penis. This happens without intervention as the connective tissue bonding the foreskin to the head of his penis dissolves on its own. As this happens, you can teach your son to wash the end of his penis with soap and water and rinse it well. Some boys will be able to fully retract or pull back their foreskin by the time they start Kindergarten while others may not fully retract it until puberty. Both are okay. Read full post »

Preventing Sexual Abuse: Seattle Mama Doc 101


With the Penn State tragedy and recent news out of Syracuse this past week, most parents have thought of, and/or worried about sexual abuse more than once this month. The wretched reality is, we will keep getting reminded about sexual abuse in children because it is so common. Thankfully, we can help our children define, get words for, protect against, and support them in their understanding about how to prevent sexual abuse. You can start this today.

If you’re worried or unsure how to proceed at any moment, it’s always okay to visit the pediatrician or clinician your child sees for support, help, and a check-up.

Open up channels of communication about preventing sexual abuse as early as age 3. Start by defining “good touch” from “bad touch.” Use anatomic terms (vagina or penis) and answer questions your children have. Return to these conversations occassionally, every few months, every single year. Always trust your instincts if something doesn’t feel right. Explore and ask questions if your child expresses concern, confusion, or fear.

Preventing Sexual Abuse

  • Trust your child. Children rarely will lie about sexual abuse.
  • A great overview on preventing sexual abuse including possible signs of sexual abuse (at the end)
  • A hand-out defining sexual abuse, some statistics, and characteristics of abusers composed by perpetrators of child sexual abuse while in recovery. A note on this–I found this upsetting to read but did gain insight from it.
  • HHS information about programs and curriculum for children (and adults) on preventing sexual abuse
Please share tips, strategies, research, or wisdom you have in helping educate parents and children in preventing sexual abuse here:

How Much Salt Is Okay? Seattle Mama Doc 101


I’m a salt-fiend. I really really love it. I’d choose a pickle over a piece of cake any day. Problem is, I’m realizing my palate for the salt lick out ba

Establish Traditions: Seattle Mama Doc 101

Establishing traditions can be an incredible way to connect, mark time, and affirm a sense of well being in your family. You can establish any tradition you want–one of the rare perks of being a grown-up. Even if family circumstances change (a divorce or separation, a death in the family, a move to a new city) you can adapt, addend, and alter your traditions. Your kids can help you sort out new rules as necessary. Those traditions really may establish a sense of calm for your children.

And really, as you make or restart some traditions at home, don’t stress about extravagance. Sometimes the best traditions are the most simple and come with absolutely no price tag. A walk with a football after dinner each Thanksgiving. Unscheduled or unplugged time the same day every year. Eating pickles on Black Friday. Standing outside in the snow as the New Year arrives. Whatever it is, it can be all yours. And your children will remember.

Start or establish rituals this holiday season and then repeat, repeat, repeat. Share your favorite traditions; what can we all be doing that we haven’t thought of?

Create A Spirit of Giving

15 Meaningful Holiday Traditions

 

The Saturday Box

We’re all looking for little tidbits and rituals to insert into our busy lives that actually help in that quest to have life run smoothly. I suspect The Saturday Box is one ritual worth considering.

I’m not saying that my parents did it all right (ahem….no), but circa 1983, I think the Saturday Box exceeded expectations. Our box inspired a sense of greater responsibility and established a democratic process for clean-up in our home. Less fighting, less let-down, less guilt, and less tension. More responsibility, more ownership, and more order. The genius: the box wasn’t just for my brother and me. Plenty of parental-garb ended up in our Saturday Box and the concept alone invoked a sense of equality. Not unexpectedly, we were occasionally feisty; I have a very clear memory of a family meeting being called after my father’s wallet landed in the Saturday Box….

Watch the video about the Saturday Box. What do you think? Have another successful tidbit to share? Will you do this and report back?

How Much Milk? Seattle Mama Doc 101

We don’t need cows to survive but their milk sure does provide us with a convenient source of calcium. The amount of milk our children need varies with age. I outline needs in the video but know this, as your child ages from a preschooler to a school-age child to a teenager, their calcium needs increase. Of course, if your child doesn’t like milk or is allergic to milk products, you have plenty of ways to get them the calcium they need from other foods rich in calcium to fortified juices to calcium supplements and calcium-fortified bars.

Getting The Calcium Our Children Need:

  • Lowfat milk is an easy and affordable source of calcium, but it certainly isn’t the only one. Other calcium rich foods include soybeans (edamame), tofu, broccoli, spinach, and almonds. Click on that link for a comparison of how much calcium each food contains compared to a cup of lowfat milk.
  • Calcium needs increase by age. Here’s a chart that breaks it down by the milligrams of calcium kids need each day. If you’re not into counting milligrams of calcium, think of calcium needs by the glasses of milk need daily: about 2 cups for 2 to 3 year olds, 2 1/2 cups for 4 to 8 year olds, and 3 cups for rapid-growing 9 to 18 year olds.
  • You don’t need whole milk for proper nutrition after age 2. “Whole” only refers to the amount of dairy fats, not the amount of vitamins or protein. US Studies find that almost 1/3 of families still serve their older children whole milk. I recommend switching to lowfat milk once your child turns 2.
  • Fewer than 1 in 10 girls gets the calcium they need between the age of 9 and 13 years. Fewer than 1 in 4 boys in the same age gets what they need. I’m perplexed by the sex difference, but suspect it has to do with calorie restriction (read: dieting), cultural norms, and the vast array of alternative beverages marketed to teens. When I searched for an explanation, I found data on fur seals. If you know the answer, please leave a comment!
  • If you are concerned your child is lactose-intolerant (very rare prior to age 5 years) consider getting milk products that are lactose-free or getting pills from the doctor that help children digest the lactose (milk sugar).
  • If your child isn’t a milk-hound, consider finding ways to keep calcium-rich snacks within reach. For easy snacks consider a handful of almonds or a piece of low-fat string cheese. Leave them out and in arm’s reach after school.
  • And remember, the only two things your toddler to teen needs to drink on planet earth are milk & water. Everything else is an extra.

What Is The Tdap Shot? Seattle Mama Doc 101

Tdap is a shot necessary for all adults and children starting at age 11 that protects against infections caused by Tetanus, Diptheria, and Pertussis (Whooping Cough). Because of increasing reports of Whooping Cough and increased infant deaths in the last 2 years, we are working hard to protect infants, children, adolescents and adults from Whooping Cough (caused by Pertussis). Most importantly we want to protect our newborn babies from being exposed or contracting whooping cough. Whooping cough is most dangerous and most devastating (occasionally fatal) for newborn babies (under 2 months of age) and infants under the age of 6 months. If you are around a newborn baby it’s essential you’ve had a Tdap shot at least once as an adult. Watch the video for more.

Keep in mind, even fully vaccinated adults can get pertussis. If you are caring for infants or young children, check with your health care provider about what’s best for your situation.

What is Whooping Cough & How is it Treated (Link)?

WHEN TO CALL THE PEDIATRICIAN: Pertussis infection starts out acting like a cold. You should consider the possibility of whooping cough if the following conditions are present:

  • The child is a very young infant who has not been fully immunized and/or has had exposure to someone with a chronic cough or the disease.
  • The child’s cough becomes more severe and frequent, or her lips and fingertips become dark or blue.
  • She becomes exhausted after coughing episodes, eats poorly, vomits after coughing, and/or looks “sick.”

How To Protect Your Family From Whooping Cough

  • The best way to prevent Pertussis (Whooping Cough) is to get vaccinated.
  • Children 7 to 10 years old who did not have their full DTP/DTaP series (2,4,6, and 15 months shots) need a Tdap shot.
  • Children with either an unknown or incomplete shot record/history before age 7 years of age need a Tdap shot.
  • All adolescents with an up-to-date record need the Tdap shot at the 11 year old well child check-up/visit.
  • Anyone over age 11 who has not previously received Tdap – when indicated.
  • There’s no minimum interval between Td and Tdap vaccines. Meaning, if you for some reason had a Td (“tetanus booster”) in the last few years, you still need a Tdap now to protect against whooping cough(Pertussis). No 5-10 year interval is required between the shot.
  • Vaccine protection for pertussis, tetanus and diphtheria fades with time, so adults need a booster shot. Experts recommend adults receive a Td booster every 10 years and substitute a Tdap vaccine for one of the boosters.
  • Getting vaccinated with Tdap is especially important for adults who are around infants – new parents, grandparents, babysitters, nannies, and health care providers.

AAP Policy Statement on Using Tdap to prevent Pertussis

CDC: Protecting your family from whooping cough (Pertussis)

Limited Time At Well Baby Checks: Seattle Mama Doc 101

A recent study confirmed that there is limited time with pediatricians for well baby care. The Pediatrics study surveyed parents retrospectively about their well-baby visits with pediatricians; 1/3 of parents reported having less than 10 minutes with the doctor! I say this can still be a great place for partnership, reassurance, diagnosis, and care even if time is limited. As a parent, you have to be a pro, too. Plan ahead, prioritize questions for the doctor, and help set the agenda for the visit when the pediatrician walks in the room. It’s always okay to ask (anything) and it’s always okay to return for follow-up visit, too.

Maximizing Time With Your Baby’s Pediatrician:

  • Set an agenda. The minute the pediatrician walks in the room, tell them what you want to learn during the visit and what worries or stumps you most about your baby or your parenting. If you help shape the agenda, you’ll avoid those painful “door-handle” conversations where the doc tries to leave (because there are other patients waiting and there is no more time) and you feel rushed and dejected. No one likes those conversations. If your doctor isn’t good at agenda-setting, you can be. Remember this is a partnership, not a dictatorship…
  • Because time is unfortunately always limited, prioritize your questions. You may have 15 questions, but list them out in order of concern/preference. As your pediatrician asks their own questions and completes a comprehensive physical exam of your baby, it’s possible to ask others and you may find yourself surprised that they addressed concerns you had without prompting. But prioritize so you don’t forget the last (and possibly most important) question of all.
  • It’s always okay to ask. ANYTHING. Don’t shy away from questions because your doc has limited time. If necessary come back a week or month later if you’re still wondering about something you need to clarify.
  • It’s okay to schedule a follow-up visit. One of the pitfalls in well baby care is that many parent want to squeeze 2 or 3 visits into one. During a well baby visit, there is a lot to accomplish (some studies find that docs are supposed to cover over 50 topics). So if you are also concerned about an acute or new illness/behavior problem, consider scheduling a separate visit. You’ll likely all be more satisfied with how you can get what you need and how you can partner to protect and prevent illness and injury for your baby or child.
  • Don’t leave empty handed! Ask the doctor what websites or online references you should read for more information after the visit.

 

How To Stop A Nosebleed: Seattle Mama Doc 101

Nosebleeds are a common frustration during childhood. Although finger-nose-picking is a common cause, other climate changes (dry), medication use (nasal sprays), and other medical problems (rarely) can be the cause. The best advice? Don’t panic. And do your best to help prevent nosebleeds: stop the picking (GOOD LUCK), use humidifiers in children’s rooms, nasal saline spray, or Vaseline. And, keep a towel handy. One of the best ways to calm down when the blood is gushing is to sop it all up.

My quick tips:

Don’t Panic.

Don’t stick anything up your child’s nose to stop the bleeding.

Don’t have your child lean back, rather apply pressure to the nose for 10 complete minutes while your child is tipped slightly forwards.

Healthy Children’s Tips on Stopping nosebleeds

Nosebleeds, See A Doctor If:

  • Bleeding does not stop in 20 minutes, after you’ve applied pressure.
  • If you think your child may have put something in their nose or something is stuck there (like a bead).
  • Your child has more than 3 nosebleeds in 24 hours
  • Your child gets frequent (weekly or even monthly), heavy or hard-to-stop nosebleeds
  • The nosebleed is a result of a blow to the head or serious fall
  • If your child is dizzy or is weak with the nosebleed