Teens

All Articles in the Category ‘Teens’

The “Inherent Risk And Implied Immorality” of Distracted Driving

Distracted driving = drunk driving. All doctors in and out of primary care should be telling patients this. Oprah talks about it nearly every day. We should, too. We have the rare privilege of an often captive audience. Our patients come to us for advice.

Framing distracted driving with drunk driving conveys the “Inherent Risk and implied immorality” of the situation, wrote Dr Amy Ship in today’s New England Journal of Medicine.

She says, “more than 275 millionAmericans own cell phones, and 81% of them talk on those phoneswhile driving.” It’s time for primary care doctors to not only talk about the issue, but frame and explain the risk that distracted driving poses for patients.  In my world that is teenagers who are driving.  And then all the children who ride around in cars with drivers who are distracted.

In the editorial, Dr Ship uses a Youtube video for storytelling and education. It’s a brilliant use of new media. A little morsel for all of us to endure.

If you have a teenager, will you please show them this video? Graphic, real, and powerful, it tells the story of consequence. And what it looks like to suffer from risks taken while driving distracted. If we can put down the phone, maybe we can all learn how to drive again. Don’t some people say they wish they were 16 again? This may be our chance.

Guest Blog: “Image Gently” 5 Things You Can Do

Here’s The Husband. There is no ghost-writing, I promise. I’ve kept my hands tied behind my back for the past few days.

The Husband is a pediatric radiologist. He works at Children’s. He’s passionate about reducing the amount of radiation a child receives when they have any imaging. In the medical world, “imaging” includes x-rays, CT scans (“cat” scans), bone scans, MRI studies, ultrasound, and procedures like “swallow studies” and VCUGs. He’s real smart and has taught me why to reduce the number of x-rays and CT scans I obtain in my own clinic.

Our tale began when we met the first day of medical school. I went up to the physician lecturer and made a comment after a lecture on gun violence. Jonathan stood right behind me. He said, “Ditto to everything she said.”  I don’t think he’s ever said ditto again. Darn.

Read his guest post. You’ll learn ways to reduce radiation exposure for your children. I say, “Ditto to everything he said.”

Read full post »

Prepare

I’m gonna be honest, making a disaster kit completely stressed me out. I hope my experience will make it better for you. I’m no expert at this but have learned a lot along the way. And there is no question, I feel so much better with my family prepared and my preparedness tidied.

As The Economist said last week when discussing Iceland’s volcano, “Disasters are about people and planning, not nature’s pomp.”

Prepare.

I believe in the 3 tiered approach you see everywhere:

  • Make a Kit(detailed below and in my video)
  • Make a Plan (how to communicate and find your family)
  • Stay Informed (what disasters are likely to happen, where to find info)

If you watched the video, you know that Dr Suzan Mazor and I were totally overwhelmed by the task. Do your best to buddy up; having a partner was the best move I made. Hopefully she’d agree. Thanks again, Suzan. Please continue to be my friend despite me filming a video while sitting under a desk and having you help edit it at 11:30pm on a Friday night. Read full post »

O’s Tylenol is Famous: Medication Recall

We woke up today and I read the Tylenol, Motrin, Zyrtec, and Benadryl medication recall from yesterday. It’s a voluntary recall but concerns remain about quality of the medication.  Then I realized the Tylenol I gave O yesterday was still on the counter.

O’s Tylenol is famous, it turns out. It’s part of the recall. Medications on the recall list include: Infant Tylenol, Children’s Tylenol, Motrin, Zyrtec, and Benadryl.

Check the list and check your medicine cabinet.  Maybe you have a bottle of famous medicine, too.

Remember to look just above the medication name for the NDC number as seen in the photo. Then throw it out if you find a match. Call your pediatrician if you have any concerns.

O is fine……

Information for the McNeil product recall here.

Making a 3-Day Disaster Kit

If It Were My Child: Use the Buddy System and Make a 3-Day Disaster Kit

Doctor Suzan Mazor driving a carThese earthquakes (Haiti, Chile, California, China) are freaking me out. So did reading this article. Later this month, you get to see my complete video blog of my effort to make a 3-day disaster kit, a disaster packet for my F’s preschool, my interpretation of what you need particularly for kids, and watch me ready my family for the worst of the worst. I partnered up with my friend, Dr Suzan Mazor because she’s scared, too. Meet Suzan. She’s smart and very funny.

I’m finally doing it—preparing my home and family for the unthinkable. If it were my child, I’d make a 3-day disaster kit. I’ve procrastinated for years. Every time I have perused the sites on how to prepare for a disaster, I have gotten so freaked out and scared about disaster-death-dilapidation that I’ve become paralyzed in my effort. Subsequently, I had never assembled anything for the kit. Really, I’m one of those people who until last week didn’t have water stored in the basement. Are you? Read full post »

Which Is It?

Running to PottyI spent the weekend lying around feeling like death on a cracker. And most of my mental thought other than, “Please, please go away, bug” was consumed by the question, “Which is it?”

Food poisoning and a bad weekend for me
or
Gastroenteritis and a bad week for me, my O, my F, the husband, and my friend visiting from San Francisco

Let me explain. Food poisoning is not likely to be contagious, gastroenteritis (or stomach flu) is. This phenomenon of stressing on my exact diagnosis has occurred only since having kids. See, I had the “stomach flu” all weekend. I visited the porcelain bowl more than 30 times on Saturday. I felt like utter crum-dog. You’ll have to endure no more details than that, but lemme tell you, it was awful.

As a mom now, what worries me the most when this happens is ensuring the kids don’t get it. Because then it would be a total nut-house-disaster-ness-gross-vomitorium-diarrhea-pit. You know what I mean. Nausea and “not being able to control my secretions” is something okay for me, but nothing I want my kids to endure. Let alone have to clean up after. Read full post »

Verbatim: “You Mean Because I’m Fat?”

Recently, one of my teenage patients was in to see me. I’ve seen him a lot this year. I think about him nearly every day because I’m desperately trying to help him. I’m just so stinking worried about the choices he’s making. At the end of the visit, I said, “We’ve got a lot of work to do so I’ll see you in 2 weeks.”  He responded, “You mean, because I’m fat?”

No, I didn’t. We hadn’t even talked about his obesity at the visit. We’d talked about all the other stuff clogging up his path to happiness, long life, good health, generous love and earnest support. He’s had a heap of trouble this past year. He’s run away from home about 4 times (once for over 40 days–his poor mom), he’s currently living in a shelter, he was using drugs, he was self-tattooing with an ink pen under her skin (eeeeep!), he stopped taking his daily medicines, he’s obese and gaining weight, he got an STD….it goes on and on. My worry is real and rationale, you see.

But his comment at the end of our visit reminded me about how hard I work to talk to children and their families about overweight in ways that don’t alienate them. And how I obviously need to work harder. A new study points out the importance of letting kids know they are overweight. Read full post »

Atta Girl, Michelle Obama: Let’s Move!

Let's Move Atta girl, Michelle Obama. Thank you for the personal, passionate and most excellent articulation of a big problem facing nearly 1/3 of all children in the US today.

Michelle Obama’s introduction of Let’s Move to end childhood obesity in one generation will do wonders.

Thank you, Michelle. I know we’re not personally friends but you do send me regular e-mails and sign them, “Michelle.” So we’ll go forth on a first name basis. And whenever you’re ready for a play date, I’m game.  Let’s meet at your house; we’ll introduce the husbands.

Let’s end the obesity challenge for our children, now. Speaking of now, now that about 1/3 of the children I see in the office are overweight, I spend hours (read: hours) every day in clinic talking about it. I worry our country’s problem with obesity isn’t going away any time soon. As a pediatrician I can help my patients gain perspective and knowledge but I ultimately need my patients to help themselves move more, eat right and turn off the TV. They need help from their families and communities to do this. Hard to do. Like most things in my life, these kids (and all of us!) need a lot of help from our friends. Read full post »

Constructing Snacks into Mini-Meals

Over the past 20 years, the amount of calories consumed by children from snacks has increased by 30%. Kids eat a third more calories everyday from snacks! What kids snack on certainly can reflect how their diet is shaped and how they grow. Plain and simple: snacks make us fatter by packing in lots of calories in relatively small bits of food, the definition of “calorie dense” foods. They also discourage our eating of things like fruit and veggies because they fill us all up. One recent study found it was our over-consumption of snacks more than our under-consumption of fruits and veggies that is getting us into trouble.

Beware of the foods in red/orange/yellow packaging; these are generally foods that are not very good for you. Research finds that these colors make you feel hungry, thus advertisers use the colors to increase the likelihood that you purchase (and eat) junk food. Think about food packaging like you think about the threat level at the airport. Red and orange are generally a no-go. Steering clear of this part of the ROYGBIV (red.orange.yellow.green.blue.indigo.violet) food isle is important. As snacks make up more of our entire diet, what we choose to snack on may be as important as what we make for dinner.

Whine with your snack?
Whine-fest 2010 continues in our house. Beautiful. I’ve gotten out my baton and I’m now conducting from a perch in the kitchen. All those years of band (yes, I played the oboe) and weekly orchestra practice are finally paying off. Play date sign-up for whine-fest in our house will be online soon. Guest conductors accepted. Read full post »