Teens

All Articles in the Category ‘Teens’

Guns In Your House?

Asking friends about guns is like asking about their underwear. Not in the pediatric office, but at home, on the street, and in the neighborhood. Hear me out…

My next-door-neighbor (NDN) is a stay at home dad (SAHD). On most days, he runs his household and wrangles 8 and 6 year-old boys until his wife joins him after work. The three (or four) of them seem to weave and pedal through life, on and off their bikes. I can see them coming and going throughout the day; it’s my crystal ball of sorts as to what life with 2 boys may look like about 5 years from now…

Last Friday, NDN approached me from his porch. We often talk, porch-to-porch, about life, the trees, our favorite noodle shop, or the weather. Last Friday, it was different. He said, “You should write a post about gun violence.” I said, “Yah, I know, I should write about 2 million posts…”

But then he framed the issue for me. And I knew he was right.
Read full post »

Drowning: Quieter, Faster, & Closer Than You Think

Two teenagers died in New York yesterday. Not from a gun shot, a car crash, or suicides. Rather, they drowned in a popular swimming hole in the Bronx river on a hot summer day. I hate stories like that. Hate hearing it, hate seeing the headline. A total failure for prevention efforts.

I talk about drowning in clinic every day I see patients. I should probably talk about it more often. As I said in my earlier post outlining the new AAP Prevention of Drowning guidelines (& swimming lessons between age 1-4 yrs), drowning is the second leading cause of injury related death in children 1 to 19 years of age. And most drownings in the US happen this time of year. When it’s hot outside, the lake, stream, or pool can look really gooood. Even to those who don’t know how to swim.

I talk about drowning mostly with the parents of toddlers. But I should spend more time talking with adolescents. I get distracted by all the drugs, sex, and rock-and-roll stuff I talk about. Today, I am reminded of the importance of talking with teens about drowning, because of those teens but also this perspective about drowning.

See drowning isn’t what you think it is. It’s not loud and splashy and outrageous. It’s not like it looks in the movies… Read full post »

Silent Deliciousness

When I first watched this video, the computer volume was off (I didn’t know it) and I thought this was a silent video. I loved the stillness of the quiet mixed with the emotion of the ad.

I cried (yes, I’m the kind of person who always does) one of those quiet cries, the kind where you’d never know I was crying unless you were looking straight into my eyes. Tears just dripped silently.

Instead of being impregnated with fear, this public service announcement is loaded with hope.

Such a simple, kind way to illustrate why we take the time to buckle-up.

Isn’t it amazing how much people love you?

PS–Because it was such a stunningly nice way to watch this, I recommend you watch this first without sound, then watch it again with the music turned way up. Also, if you share this with teens, will you share with me what they thought of it? I’m on the fence thinking this will resonate with those 12-18 year olds. As I am in the process of creating a list of videos for children to watch on YouTube (to hand out at check-ups), I wonder if I should include this. Digame.

The “Inherent Risk And Implied Immorality” of Distracted Driving

Distracted driving = drunk driving. All doctors in and out of primary care should be telling patients this. Oprah talks about it nearly every day. We should, too. We have the rare privilege of an often captive audience. Our patients come to us for advice.

Framing distracted driving with drunk driving conveys the “Inherent Risk and implied immorality” of the situation, wrote Dr Amy Ship in today’s New England Journal of Medicine.

She says, “more than 275 millionAmericans own cell phones, and 81% of them talk on those phoneswhile driving.” It’s time for primary care doctors to not only talk about the issue, but frame and explain the risk that distracted driving poses for patients.  In my world that is teenagers who are driving.  And then all the children who ride around in cars with drivers who are distracted.

In the editorial, Dr Ship uses a Youtube video for storytelling and education. It’s a brilliant use of new media. A little morsel for all of us to endure.

If you have a teenager, will you please show them this video? Graphic, real, and powerful, it tells the story of consequence. And what it looks like to suffer from risks taken while driving distracted. If we can put down the phone, maybe we can all learn how to drive again. Don’t some people say they wish they were 16 again? This may be our chance.

Guest Blog: “Image Gently” 5 Things You Can Do

Here’s The Husband. There is no ghost-writing, I promise. I’ve kept my hands tied behind my back for the past few days.

The Husband is a pediatric radiologist. He works at Children’s. He’s passionate about reducing the amount of radiation a child receives when they have any imaging. In the medical world, “imaging” includes x-rays, CT scans (“cat” scans), bone scans, MRI studies, ultrasound, and procedures like “swallow studies” and VCUGs. He’s real smart and has taught me why to reduce the number of x-rays and CT scans I obtain in my own clinic.

Our tale began when we met the first day of medical school. I went up to the physician lecturer and made a comment after a lecture on gun violence. Jonathan stood right behind me. He said, “Ditto to everything she said.”  I don’t think he’s ever said ditto again. Darn.

Read his guest post. You’ll learn ways to reduce radiation exposure for your children. I say, “Ditto to everything he said.”

Read full post »

Prepare

I’m gonna be honest, making a disaster kit completely stressed me out. I hope my experience will make it better for you. I’m no expert at this but have learned a lot along the way. And there is no question, I feel so much better with my family prepared and my preparedness tidied.

As The Economist said last week when discussing Iceland’s volcano, “Disasters are about people and planning, not nature’s pomp.”

Prepare.

I believe in the 3 tiered approach you see everywhere:

  • Make a Kit(detailed below and in my video)
  • Make a Plan (how to communicate and find your family)
  • Stay Informed (what disasters are likely to happen, where to find info)

If you watched the video, you know that Dr Suzan Mazor and I were totally overwhelmed by the task. Do your best to buddy up; having a partner was the best move I made. Hopefully she’d agree. Thanks again, Suzan. Please continue to be my friend despite me filming a video while sitting under a desk and having you help edit it at 11:30pm on a Friday night. Read full post »

O’s Tylenol is Famous: Medication Recall

We woke up today and I read the Tylenol, Motrin, Zyrtec, and Benadryl medication recall from yesterday. It’s a voluntary recall but concerns remain about quality of the medication.  Then I realized the Tylenol I gave O yesterday was still on the counter.

O’s Tylenol is famous, it turns out. It’s part of the recall. Medications on the recall list include: Infant Tylenol, Children’s Tylenol, Motrin, Zyrtec, and Benadryl.

Check the list and check your medicine cabinet.  Maybe you have a bottle of famous medicine, too.

Remember to look just above the medication name for the NDC number as seen in the photo. Then throw it out if you find a match. Call your pediatrician if you have any concerns.

O is fine……

Information for the McNeil product recall here.

Making a 3-Day Disaster Kit

If It Were My Child: Use the Buddy System and Make a 3-Day Disaster Kit

Doctor Suzan Mazor driving a carThese earthquakes (Haiti, Chile, California, China) are freaking me out. So did reading this article. Later this month, you get to see my complete video blog of my effort to make a 3-day disaster kit, a disaster packet for my F’s preschool, my interpretation of what you need particularly for kids, and watch me ready my family for the worst of the worst. I partnered up with my friend, Dr Suzan Mazor because she’s scared, too. Meet Suzan. She’s smart and very funny.

I’m finally doing it—preparing my home and family for the unthinkable. If it were my child, I’d make a 3-day disaster kit. I’ve procrastinated for years. Every time I have perused the sites on how to prepare for a disaster, I have gotten so freaked out and scared about disaster-death-dilapidation that I’ve become paralyzed in my effort. Subsequently, I had never assembled anything for the kit. Really, I’m one of those people who until last week didn’t have water stored in the basement. Are you? Read full post »

Which Is It?

Running to PottyI spent the weekend lying around feeling like death on a cracker. And most of my mental thought other than, “Please, please go away, bug” was consumed by the question, “Which is it?”

Food poisoning and a bad weekend for me
or
Gastroenteritis and a bad week for me, my O, my F, the husband, and my friend visiting from San Francisco

Let me explain. Food poisoning is not likely to be contagious, gastroenteritis (or stomach flu) is. This phenomenon of stressing on my exact diagnosis has occurred only since having kids. See, I had the “stomach flu” all weekend. I visited the porcelain bowl more than 30 times on Saturday. I felt like utter crum-dog. You’ll have to endure no more details than that, but lemme tell you, it was awful.

As a mom now, what worries me the most when this happens is ensuring the kids don’t get it. Because then it would be a total nut-house-disaster-ness-gross-vomitorium-diarrhea-pit. You know what I mean. Nausea and “not being able to control my secretions” is something okay for me, but nothing I want my kids to endure. Let alone have to clean up after. Read full post »