Teens

All Articles in the Category ‘Teens’

Verbatim: “You Mean Because I’m Fat?”

Recently, one of my teenage patients was in to see me. I’ve seen him a lot this year. I think about him nearly every day because I’m desperately trying to help him. I’m just so stinking worried about the choices he’s making. At the end of the visit, I said, “We’ve got a lot of work to do so I’ll see you in 2 weeks.”  He responded, “You mean, because I’m fat?”

No, I didn’t. We hadn’t even talked about his obesity at the visit. We’d talked about all the other stuff clogging up his path to happiness, long life, good health, generous love and earnest support. He’s had a heap of trouble this past year. He’s run away from home about 4 times (once for over 40 days–his poor mom), he’s currently living in a shelter, he was using drugs, he was self-tattooing with an ink pen under her skin (eeeeep!), he stopped taking his daily medicines, he’s obese and gaining weight, he got an STD….it goes on and on. My worry is real and rationale, you see.

But his comment at the end of our visit reminded me about how hard I work to talk to children and their families about overweight in ways that don’t alienate them. And how I obviously need to work harder. A new study points out the importance of letting kids know they are overweight. Read full post »

Atta Girl, Michelle Obama: Let’s Move!

Let's Move Atta girl, Michelle Obama. Thank you for the personal, passionate and most excellent articulation of a big problem facing nearly 1/3 of all children in the US today.

Michelle Obama’s introduction of Let’s Move to end childhood obesity in one generation will do wonders.

Thank you, Michelle. I know we’re not personally friends but you do send me regular e-mails and sign them, “Michelle.” So we’ll go forth on a first name basis. And whenever you’re ready for a play date, I’m game.  Let’s meet at your house; we’ll introduce the husbands.

Let’s end the obesity challenge for our children, now. Speaking of now, now that about 1/3 of the children I see in the office are overweight, I spend hours (read: hours) every day in clinic talking about it. I worry our country’s problem with obesity isn’t going away any time soon. As a pediatrician I can help my patients gain perspective and knowledge but I ultimately need my patients to help themselves move more, eat right and turn off the TV. They need help from their families and communities to do this. Hard to do. Like most things in my life, these kids (and all of us!) need a lot of help from our friends. Read full post »

Constructing Snacks into Mini-Meals

Over the past 20 years, the amount of calories consumed by children from snacks has increased by 30%. Kids eat a third more calories everyday from snacks! What kids snack on certainly can reflect how their diet is shaped and how they grow. Plain and simple: snacks make us fatter by packing in lots of calories in relatively small bits of food, the definition of “calorie dense” foods. They also discourage our eating of things like fruit and veggies because they fill us all up. One recent study found it was our over-consumption of snacks more than our under-consumption of fruits and veggies that is getting us into trouble.

Beware of the foods in red/orange/yellow packaging; these are generally foods that are not very good for you. Research finds that these colors make you feel hungry, thus advertisers use the colors to increase the likelihood that you purchase (and eat) junk food. Think about food packaging like you think about the threat level at the airport. Red and orange are generally a no-go. Steering clear of this part of the ROYGBIV (red.orange.yellow.green.blue.indigo.violet) food isle is important. As snacks make up more of our entire diet, what we choose to snack on may be as important as what we make for dinner.

Whine with your snack?
Whine-fest 2010 continues in our house. Beautiful. I’ve gotten out my baton and I’m now conducting from a perch in the kitchen. All those years of band (yes, I played the oboe) and weekly orchestra practice are finally paying off. Play date sign-up for whine-fest in our house will be online soon. Guest conductors accepted. Read full post »

Verbatim: Pink Ones, White Ones, Good Ones

PinkWhiteExam room 3. Me at the computer, a 16 year old patient sitting on the exam table. We’re discussing her starting oral contraceptive pills for birth control. After her exam and a lengthy discussion, we talk about the pink ones, the white ones, the row of green ones, the ring, the depo shot, and the patch. I’m reminded of my mentors in pediatric gynecology who taught me that if you choose birth control that a girl is interested in trying (if it is the appropriate dose and safe for her) often her compliance in using it improves and her reports/experiences of side effects lessen. Translation: girls are more likely to take the pill correctly and continue to take it if they are motivated to use it. A dangerous reality when it comes to marketing directed at teens. But a good reality if you’re working to help teens avoid unwanted pregnancies. She has her mind set on the pill. I move on to the choice of what pill she has in mind, if any. I uncover concrete sincerity. One of the best responses to my question yet.

Me: “Is there a particular birth control pill you want to start with?”

My patient: “A really good one.”