Teens

All Articles in the Category ‘Teens’

PG-13 Movies


PG-13 movies now have more gun violence than R-rated ones.

I was in fourth grade when Red Dawn debuted as the first PG-13 rated movie back in 1985. At the time Red Dawn was released, it was considered one of the most violent films by The National Coalition on Television Violence, with a rate of 134 acts of violence per hour, or 2.23 per minute. And although not every PG-13 movie has had significant violence (think Pretty in Pink) it turns out PG-13 and gun violence have become close bedfellows over the last 28 years.

New research out today in Pediatrics finds that gun violence is becoming a more common thread in the movies. Researchers sampled 945 films (all from the top 30 grossing films annually) since 1950, coding and evaluating 5-minute violent sequences in those films. The results proved unsurprising but unsettling: overall gun-violent sequences more than doubled in the sixty years from 1950 to 2012. When looking specifically at PG-13 movies researchers saw a tripling in gun violence since the rating was created in 1985. The trend for violence in these PG-13 movies has grown so rapidly it’s created a new reality. Over the past 30 years, R-rated movies have shown no change in the amount of gun violence sequences while PG-13 have soared making gun violence more prominent in PG-13 movies than in R-rated movies. Stunning when you think of it — gun imagery densely populating the movies targeting our teens. Yes, violence sells.

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Status Update: Facebook Changes For Teens

Facebook imageFacebook changed its privacy policy for teens this week, despite work from advocacy groups and media experts against the change. On Wednesday October 16th teen privacy settings were adjusted to allow teens to share status updates and photos publicly. The change literally allows the public a window into a teen’s thoughts and photos on Facebook for the first time.

Fortunately, teens can control this by opting out of public sharing. The default setting at this point for teens when joining Facebook will not automatically allow for public sharing. Teens can opt-in after clicking through a pop-up notice. This step could of course change.

Visit the privacy setting page on Facebook with your teen.

In my opinion this is not in the best interest of our children. As we evolve and adapt to using social tools, we’re all still getting our footing. So are our teens as they begin to create a digital footprint of thoughts and photos online. Further, concerns about this shift include public access to teen sharing that will likely be data-mined and scoured by advertisers and companies hoping to target teens with goods and services.

Read this blog post from pediatrician and social media expert, Dr Megan Moreno, on the new changes for teens. Information and links on how to talk to teens about changes along with resources for learning more are included. A recent Q&A she completed online about parents and teens is linked. She says it best when she says:

This situation presents an enormous opportunity for parents to have conversations with their teens about privacy settings online.  For parents who have already had these conversations in the past, it’s time to sit down and discuss Facebook’s decision, review your family’s rules about online safety, and review your teen’s current privacy settings on Facebook – both their overall  “privacy settings” and the “audience” for their posts.

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Texting And Driving Again


The research published about texting and driving never seem to add up to my in-real-life experience. In a typical day driving in Seattle I see countless people with their phones out, many with it wedged at the steering wheel, stuck between their right hand and the right turn signal post. Like all of us have come to observe, it’s the unusual or unexpected driving patterns that alert me to look into their car window and confirm my suspicion.

I hate feeling like an old lady, angry at those few reckless decision-makers who compromise my family’s safety on the road. I also hate feeling powerless amidst the problem. After a few feeble and failed attempts to influence others’ decisions on the road (waving my hands, pointing my finger or honking my horn and screaming in my fury), it’s clear to me that we citizens can’t police the issue. Further, trying to change others’ behavior from our own driver seat is an entirely imperfect solution – yet another distraction. I can’t help but ranting that I remain angry about this significant human frailty–the inability to follow the law and put down the devices and drive. Read full post »

E-Cigarettes

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6235a6.htm

Ever Electronic Cigarette Use ~ National Use Tobacco Survey, 2011-2012

Grim news out today. E-cigarette use in teens has doubled in a year. The CDC reports that 1 in 10 high school students admitted to ever using an e-cigarette in 2012. The rate of use doubled for middle school students as well. Although I’m not surprised, I remember just weeks ago tweeting about my dismay with Jenny McCarthy’s new job– advertising e-cigarettes. I took flak. Some advocates for e-cigs felt I was shortsighted and not valuing the potential benefits of these electronic nicotine-laden vapor tubes. All I could think of was her image, the lure she may create for teens, and the likelihood that teens would peek in on e-cigs with greater fervor.

Just a month ago we learned that smokeless tobacco use is steady with teens (5%) and many teens are now turning to novel sources of nicotine (dissolvable tobacco, snuff, snus) in addition to tobacco cigarettes. I consider myself fairly up to date, and until the AAP report came out in August I’d never once heard of snus. You?

Some people are wed to the concept that e-cigs may reduce the burden of illness and smoking-related morbidity from tobacco cigarettes. Even if you believe in harm-reduction for adults (switching from tobacco cigarettes to e-cigs to reduce use or quit) this is an entirely different issue for our middle and high-school students. A nice summary of the data for e-cigs from pediatrician, Dr Aaron E Carroll, with numerous associated comments helps frame the issue.

I wish I could remain agnostic about these devices, but I can’t. This is pretty easy to say:

I don’t recommend e-cigarettes for a teen.

Compare two stats: One in five adults who smoke has used an e-cig with one in ten of ALL high school students have tried an e-cig. Teens aren’t wired to conceptualize the power of nicotine addiction.

The e-cig really does feel like the gateway to the gateway drug.

There is still a lot of unknowns about e-cigarettes. More research will come out and the FDA is likely to regulate e-cig use shortly.

In the meantime, check in with your teens, look around, and I urge your to support regulation of e-cigs and advertising of e-cigs to teens. This just can’t be good.

For A Safe 4th Of July

Screen Shot 2013-07-02 at 7.23.25 AMAs we approach the 4th of July, a quick reminder about injuries and ways to protect your children. Each year, preventable injuries occur in young children and teens from fireworks. Children between the age of 5 and 14 are the highest risk for firework injuries—over double the risk of the rest of us. Serious injuries occur including devastating injuries to the eyes and face. Not surprisingly, the most common injuries are burns. Even sparklers can cause serious burns; sparklers burn at up to 2000 degrees, as hot as a blow torch and hot enough to melt some metals.

So…..

As you prepare for the long weekend and take time with your family and friends to celebrate the incredible freedom we enjoy here in the United States, make sure your family is safe if you choose to use fireworks. Remind teens about safe driving, avoiding alcohol on the road, and distractions. A crummy fact: the 4th of July ranks as the deadliest day of the year for teen drivers.

Tips And Facts For Preventing Family Firework Injuries:

  • The most important (and likely most obvious) reminder is to never allow children to light or set-off fireworks. Injuries often occur when fireworks malfunction or are not set-off properly.
  • Don’t use or ignite homemade fireworks. All 6 firework-related deaths in 2012 in the United States occurred secondary to use of illegal or homemade fireworks.
  • If you think you’re too smart for injuries on the Fourth of July, hold on a second. Recent research found that higher levels of education do not protect against firework-related injuries.
  • If you have fireworks in your backyard, make sure you have a garden hose and bucket of water ready and full while enjoying fireworks in case of any emergency or fire.
  • Light fireworks one at a time, and move back quickly! Don’t ever allow your family members or friends to re-light a firework that didn’t go off properly or perform as expected.
  • All ages considered (children and adults), 3/4 of firework burns and injuries occur in boys and men. Males are most injured from firecrackers, sparklers, bottle rockets, roman candles, and re-loadable shells.
  • Here’s a complete, updated infographic from the Consumer Product Safety Commission about firework injuries and source of the drawing included here!

Teens Girls And Pelvic Exams

Typically, teen girls do not need a pelvic exam until they are 21. Most parents are surprised to hear this, especially if they know their teen is sexually active.

About 1/2 of teen girls are sexually active during high school which puts them at risk for sexually transmitted infections (STI) and unwanted pregnancy. However, for routine prevention and care, girls rarely need an internal pelvic or speculum exam during high school. The American College of of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) published a statement in 2012 outlining rationale for speculum exams and guidelines that support waiting until age 21 years in the absence of a health problem.

Some teens will need a visit with the gynecologist during their teen years because of health concerns, symptoms, or a desire for a long-acting reversible birth control like an IUD (intrauterine device) or implant. IUDs and implants are considered first-line birth control for teens now. The experts say these implantable devices methods are “top-tier contraceptives based on effectiveness, with pregnancy rates of less than 1% per year for perfect use and typical use. These contraceptives have the highest rates of satisfaction and continuation of all reversible contraceptives. Adolescents are at high risk of unintended pregnancy and may benefit from increased access to these methods.” Some IUD devices use hormones, some do not. Intrauterine devices can be inserted for up to 5-10 years depending on which type a teen chooses. In general, teens will need to see a gynecologist for an IUD placement.

The National Center For Health Statistics reported a near 50% decrease in teen pregnancy over the last 2 decades.

For routine care, teens should see their pediatrician every year for regular, routine well-teen care, teen vaccinations (including the HPV vaccine), and to obtain annual screening for sexually transmitted infections. Sexually active teen girls will need annual urine tests for gonorrhea and chlamydia and blood tests for HIV. We really want to grant teens access to private counseling, support, education, family planning, and well care during high school and don’t want them to erroneously worry about routinely having a pelvic exam. Read full post »

Hepatitis A Outbreak: A Vaccine For That

frozen smoothie berriesThe CDC declared an outbreak of Hepatitis A over the weekend that has affected over 30 people in 5 states. Preliminary information confirms the source of the outbreak stems from organic frozen berries that were sold at Costco stores (including stores in Washington) yet sickened people thus far are in Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, and California. No cases have been reported in Washington to date. The berries: Townsend Farms Organic Anti-Oxidant Blend, a frozen berry and pomegranate seed mix, have now been pulled from shelves and people who purchased these berries from February through May are being contacted.

The amazing thing about this outbreak: there’s been no reported cases of Hep A in children under age 18.

In the United States, Hepatitis A typically spreads through contaminated food handled by someone with the infection. Rates of Hepatitis A infection tops 5,000-10,000 cases annually in the US while they are far higher in the developing world because city water sources can get contaminated (see below). Hepatitis A vaccine is recommended before international travel.

The lack of children with infections from this outbreak is logical and potentially illustrative.

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Love The Sun, Protect Your Skin

Sun protection is essential in childhood. Here’s 3 golden rules, backed by science, for you to use when purchasing, applying/re-applying sunscreen, and protecting children from the sun. Remember, more important than any ingredient or any particular SPF number or brand is the way you use a sunscreen: the best sunscreen is one used early and often.

Sun-protective clothing (those UV shirts, shorts, and hats) is an awesome, affordable, and easy way to protect children from sun without the hassle of sunscreen. Risks for skin cancer increase with sun exposure, family history, and sunburns in particular. Protecting your children from excessive sun exposure and sunburn is an anti-cancer move. That’s power.

3 Rules For Protecting Children From Sun Exposure

  1. Respect the brilliant sun; know your local risk. Enjoy the sun but be smarter. After surviving melanoma, I’ve been forced to change the way my family lives with the sun to decrease our risks. I’ve learned a ton about letting the UV index guide me. UV index is a measure of the radiation you are exposed to when outside. Radiation from the sun increases cancer risk, increases skin aging (wrinkles!), while it decreases eye and immune health. UV index varies with the time of year, the type of weather, the latitude, and the time of day. Check out your UV index today (by zipcode) and download the free app (search “UV index” in your smartphone). Make a habit to check the UV index every day to get a sense of your family’s exposure–I guarantee it will surprise you. Even on cloudy days, the UV index midday can rise to levels that will encourage you to protect your skin. Don’t be scared of the sun, just be smarter. Read full post »

Texting And Other Risky Moves

bumpy roadI’m going to sound very middle-aged in this post. Whenever I talk about texting and driving I tend to show my age. I don’t know how it happened or when it was that I truly became a grown-up, but when it comes to texting and driving I feel nothing like a sixteen year-old.

Unfortunately, teens are particularly vulnerable in the car. Motor vehicle accidents are the number one killer of teens between 16 to 19 years of age. The reason is established: teens die most often in cars in part because teenagers are more dangerous and inexperienced on the road but also because they are one of the groups that has the lowest rate of seat belt use out there. Teens are also more prone, compared to experienced drivers, to making mistakes while driving when distracted. There’s some new information published in Pediatrics today that lends insight into teens and distraction, especially when it comes to texting.

Research at the Center for Disease Control (CDC) has established that about 1/3 of American adults say they text and drive. The reality is, it’s worse for teens: data published today from 2011 CDC surveys find that about 45% of teens said they had texted during the most recent month.

What is particularly interesting (and potentially helpful) from the new data is that some groups of teens take more risks than others. Obvious statement, yes, but something to think about especially if we can help deter those risk-takers more wisely. Teens who text are also more likely to be the ones who don’t don the seatbelt and who would get in a car with a teen who has been drinking. This data may offer up an opportunity to target approaches for interventions.

Americans, Teens Who Text & Drive

  • Car crashes are leading cause of death for teens age 16 to 19.
  • Teens are inexperienced & more dangerous drivers.
  • Teens (age 14-17) send an average of 100 texts/day yet we also know that girls send more texts than boys.
  • 33 States and Washington DC restrict cell phone use in car while an additional 5 states ban use for new drivers.
  • About 1/3 American adults say they text and drive. Read full post »

Plan B Approved For All Girls 15 And Older

Chosing Plan BThe FDA announced today that it is approving Plan B for all girls age 15 and up without a prescription.

This is good news for girls in the US of A. The easier the access to contraception, the less likely girls will have an unintended pregnancy.

As many as 80% of pregnancies in teen girls in the United States are unintended. Most pregnancies are a result of non-use of contraception or mishaps with protection (condoms breaking, pills being missed and/or forgotten or used inconsistently). The birth rate for 15 to 19 year-olds is 34 out of 1000 and although only 13% of 15 year-olds say they have had sex, by the time children head out the door to adulthood, the majority (70%) say they have had sex.

Allowing the majority of teens access to Plan B seems a great step in the right direction in avoiding unintended pregnancies. I was thrilled to see the news tonight about the FDA shifting the age from 17 years down to 15 years. Some 10% of teens report being a victim of sexual assault, putting them at risk for unintended pregnancy.

The Academy of Pediatrics’ policy on emergency contraception has provided comprehensive insight on understanding, prescribing, and using emergency contraception.
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