Vaccines

All Articles in the Category ‘Vaccines’

No Controversy, No Censorship — When Tribeca Got It Right

Screenshot 2015-02-01 12.30.40We don’t know what causes all autism but we do know vaccines don’t. Continuing to elevate myth does NO ONE any good. That’s why the Tribeca Film Festival got it right when pulling a documentary written and co-directed by vaccine science villain, Dr. Andrew Wakefield. Giving him another platform and more voice just isn’t insightful. To me it’s more noise and less what we need. There isn’t controversy here and there isn’t anything new to uncover. Allowing Wakefield more air time and the catapult generated by a film festival just ISN’T going to help us perfect parenthood and it won’t improve our jobs protecting our families, our children, and our communities. The Injustice of Immunization Interviews continues…

Tribeca Film Festival And Vaccines:

Wakefield is a doctor whose work connecting vaccines to autism was retracted from a medical journal (this is nearly UNHEARD of) and a doctor who lost his license to actually practice medicine. He’s not respected nor is his work something for us to learn from. His work may go down as one of the biggest frauds in medical history. Read: Wakefield’s article linking MMR to autism was fraudulent.

The science, on the other hand, is clear and well established. Vaccines have repeatedly and repeatedly been studied with respect to development of neurodevelopment changes and diagnoses on the autism spectrum. Don’t believe the preposterous things the politicians say. The 2011 comprehensive and enormous report from The Institute of Medicine analyzed over 1,000 studies on adverse side effects from vaccines. They concluded, “the evidence shows there are no links between immunization and some serious conditions that have raised concerns, including Type 1 diabetes and autism.” (read more here)

Ongoing research, motivated primarily because of the distrust and fear for vaccine safety propagated in movies, media, and documentaries alike continue to find the very same thing. Science continues to come out on the side of vaccines. Vaccines have adverse effects (fever, pain, seizure, and fainting, for example) but not autism. Read full post »

HPV Vaccine Decreases HPV Infections!


Great news about reducing cancer risk. Nothing controversial here…

There is early evidence from a recent Pediatrics study that the HPV vaccine is doing what it was intended to do: decrease the rates of HPV infection in teens and young adults. The study compared HPV in two groups of teen girls and young women–one group during a time prior to the vaccine being used (pre-vaccine era 2003-2006) and another group of similar girls and young women after the vaccine’s introduction (vaccine era 2009-2012). They evaluated prevalence of HPV infection in both groups (from cervicovaginal swabs) to see the effects of the vaccine on the population. The DNA tests from those swabs identified evidence of HPV infection from HPV strains that have been included in the vaccine and also additional strains of HPV infections not previously in the vaccine. Researchers also had information about the girls’ self-reported vaccine status and behavior (sexual activity).

The results are exciting and hopeful when it comes to protection from HPV vaccine.

The study shows a 64% decrease in HPV strains found within the vaccine in immunized girls ages 14-19 and a 34% decrease in HPV in girls ages 20-24 who had received the HPV shot. In my opinion, there are 2 big takeaways to this progress and learning:

  1. The vaccine is effective in protecting teens from acquiring HPV, especially so during teen years. When the shot was given in younger teens they were more likely to have better protection — likely because they are immunized early and thus if/when exposed to HPV infections during their life, they were already protected.
  2. The earlier the HPV vaccine is given, the better the hope for protection against HPV during teen and young adult years. No safety benefit in waiting to be immunized — the risks are the same from the injection but waiting allows more time when a teen could be exposed to HPV. The data out last month may also reflect previous research that the immune response is better when the immunization is given to younger girls and boys (age 11 for example, over age 16 years).

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Flu Season Update & OTC Medicines

2016 flu KYOTCs

The flu season is in full swing across America although thankfully, influenza activity is mild in most states. If you click on this interactive US map you can see where your state fairs with ongoing influenza (hit “play” and you’ll see all weeks reported this season).

It’s certainly NOT too late for your family to get a flu shot  (or nasal spray) since that’s the best way to protect against severe complications from influenza. There is no cure for influenza (antibiotics don’t treat the virus), but there are over-the-counter (OTC) products that do help ease symptoms & side effects from viruses (including influenza) that cause cold symptoms. Some doctors are calling for a “symptomatic prescription pad” that would first suggest simple aids like humidifiers, drinking fluids, and OTC products before antibiotic use. No sense in using antibiotics if the infection you or your child has is from a virus like influenza or one of hundreds that cause the “common cold.”

It’s awful when our children are sick, especially when multiple symptoms like congestion, fever, body aches, sore throat or cough interfere with sleep. Salt in the wound for parents everywhere. Sleep disruption is normal during illness, especially cough and colds, and especially with infants and toddlers who are unaccustomed to moving mucus around while they sleep. So parents often turn to multi-symptom OTC products out of desperation! Sometimes these medicines really reduce symptoms that can make the whole family suffer but there are cautions we have to take.

First off, cough and cold medicines are not typically recommended in children under age 4 to 6 years of age.

In addition, we have to use our smarts with medicines that contain more than 1 ingredient that treat different symptoms. Being aware of the ingredients in the OTC product you’re using is very important because you don’t want to take another product that includes the same ingredients as another (doubling-up). This can happen if you give your child acetaminophen, for example, for fever and then give a cough and cold medicine with that same ingredient. Read full post »

Quick Ask This Flu Season: Peer To Peer Protection

If our entire community got the flu vaccine we’d be MUCH less likely to share it. We’d also be much less likely to get influenza. Studies find that about 10-40% of children get influenza each season. Because their immune systems are a bit “naive” to influenza, they are at risk for more serious illness, especially if under age 5 years.

What if parents were the ones to endorse protection from influenza? What if we drove our schools and playgroups and community protection? I want our communities safe and healthy this flu season and our best defense is the flu vaccine, staying home when ill, and covering our coughs. It may be the mom-to-mom-dad-to-dad message that is most powerful…

The match between the flu vaccine (nasal spray and the shot) and circulating strains of influenza are better this year (including the H3N2 strain). That means the flu vaccine will likely be far more effective in protecting our families!

Data has shown us that nearly 1/2 of the adult population does NOT get their flu shot, yet 75% of parents to young children DO get their young children and toddlers vaccinated. Parents really do want their children protected and although pregnant moms are at high risk for flu only about 50% got their flu vaccine last year. Not only does mom get protection of her own health when she gets the vaccine, she passes on antibodies to her baby!

Will you share a video with your community? I created the below series of flu videos in partnership with The American Academy of Pediatrics targeted to specific demographics and age ranges. You can share them via email, social media or in-person. Help me make the case to ensure our kids are healthy and protected this flu season. I’ve provided the videos and links to share them below. Thank you for joining me in avoiding influenza this year. Share one of these videos?

8 & Under: Why Flu Vaccine Is an Every-Year Thing!

Link to share: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kS9mgx8Bemg

 

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Flu Season, Pregnant Moms, And The GOP Debate

NFID T.F.

A selfie with Dr. Tom Frieden, Director of Centers for Disease Control (CDC)

It’s been a whirlwind this past week. Last week I flew to Washington D.C. as an invited speaker at the NFID Influenza News Conference at the National Press Club in Washington D.C. I joined thoughtful experts: Drs. Tom Frieden, Kathy Neuzil and Bill Schaffner to present the 2015/16 flu season recommendations and explain rationale for every-year flu vaccine. It’s an essential vaccine for children, especially as young children are at elevated risk for more serious or even deadly influenza infections. Timing auspiciously peaked interest in the news as the press conference was in the morning immediately after the presidential candidate debate where wild myths were shared on stage about vaccine science and safety. I was able to also share my refute of Trump’s false statements here on NBC Nightly News.

I got my flu vaccine at the event in front of the cameras. Thanks to the new jet-injected vaccines (truly a needleless “shot”) it didn’t even hurt! As expected, I was sore in my arm for a day or two thereafter.

Prepping for the press conference, I was a little underwhelmed to learn that only roughly 50% of pregnant women get the flu vaccine. If you’re expecting, here’s what you need to know about the flu vaccine. Quick 1-minute video below. SPOILER: it’s an essential and safe vaccine to get at any point of your pregnancy. Read full post »

More Teens Getting HPV Vaccine: Boys And Girls

The vaccine schedule is the same schedule for boys and for girls. The path to today’s human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine has not been entirely straightforward for parents as recommendations have changed over time. Know this: the clear and simple message is that HPV vaccine is safe and effective for boys and girls. We know it works best when given earlier in the tween/teen years and we know the immunity it produces in our bodies is durable and lasting. HPV vaccines is an anti-cancer vaccine that works best when given to boys and girls at age 11. For me it’s a no-brainer to recommend this vaccine enthusiastically before children head off to 6th grade.

Earnestly, it’s not a “new” vaccine as pediatricians began giving the vaccine back in 2007 and it’s been given well over 50 million times. In the U.S. we starting giving the vaccine to girls first yet because human papilloma virus can infect boys and girls, men and women, HPV vaccine is also recommended for boys age 11 and older. Uptake by boys has been fast and steady since recommendations included them. Three different HPV vaccines are now available: a 2-HPV strain (protects against the viral strains that cause 70% of cervical cancer) or a 4-HPV strain vaccine (same 2 strains plus two more that protect against HPV strains causing warts) and now a 9-strain vaccine (expansion of strains causing warts), upping the number of different viruses that the vaccine protects teens against. The new options improve protection against HPV viruses that cause genital warts and also HPV viruses that can cause cancers of the cervix, mouth, throat, vagina and rarely, the penis.

HPV Vaccine Protecting Teens

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3 Things To Know If Your Daughter Is Off To College

Prepping for college - female.pngIf you have a daughter getting ready to head to college this fall, holy moly I’m excited for you. In clinic it’s clear to me that the huge transition from high school to college-age brings great joy but also a remarkable sense of unrest for everyone, too. Vaccines, birth control, and suicide prevention may not top your to-do list while packing the car but there’s no question these are 3 things you can check in on to ensure it’s a better and safer year for your daughter. Not only is a brand new meningitis vaccine available to college-age girls this fall, included here are reminders with ways to support your daughter and her health as she heads off to learn even more…

ONE: Birth Control Options For Your Teen Daughter

1. Amazing Resources To Prevent Unwanted Pregnancy

The CDC confirms that as girls head off to college we know over 40% of them have had sex. And although 4 in 5 of them used a form of birth control the last time they had sex, only about 5% are using the most effective forms to prevent pregnancy. Read full post »

California Mandates Vaccines Like West Virginia And Mississippi

Illustration by David Rosenman

Illustration by David Rosenman

Yesterday California Governor Jerry Brown signed a childhood vaccination bill into law along with a letter stating, “The science is clear that vaccines dramatically protect children against a number of infectious and dangerous diseases. While it’s true that no medical intervention is without risk, the evidence shows that immunization powerfully benefits and protects the community.” The hash-tagged, much discussed bill (#SB277) was co-authored and proposed to lawmakers by Dr Richard Pan, a pediatrician and CA state senator in Sacramento. The law, SB 277, establishes one of the toughest mandatory vaccination requirements in the nation for school children and those in child-care centers. As imagined, the process of getting the bill into law was not for the faint of heart. Riding on realities of necessary community immunity unveiled during the 2014-2015 Disney measles outbreak, the idea of mandating vaccines for public health still ignited evocative and divisive bullying campaigns on social media.

We can’t forget that these outbreaks are dangerous (over 20 people were hospitalized for measles during the Disney outbreak and 5 children in Chicago got measles while at daycare). Remember that infants are more vulnerable to getting measles and they’re also at greater risk to die from it.

Testimony before the state senate was reported to be passionate, evocative, and compelling from both sides. The law passed the senate by a 24 – 14 vote and went to the governor. By signing the bill into law yesterday, Governor Brown acknowledges a tenet in public health and vaccination: vaccines are for individuals, yes, but they also serve to protect others — those especially vulnerable and not. Read full post »

Good News & Bad News: Whooping Cough

Two new Pediatrics studies are out this week teaching us more about the effectiveness of the whooping cough vaccine. Lots to learn about how we protect babies and reminders here why we’re immunizing moms during EVERY pregnancy:

  • First, the good news: traditionally we have been trained to tell parents that the first shots we give during infancy aren’t fully protective for infants but rather the beginning of creating immunity against the diseases they prevent. However, a study conducted by researchers at the CDC looked back at cases of infants with pertussis from 1991-2008 and they found evidence that babies who received their whooping cough shot as early as they could, at the age of 6 weeks, were less likely to be hospitalized and/or die from the infection. Wonderful news! The first evidence out there that even that first shot, when given as early as possible, helps protect very young infants who are most at risk from whooping cough. New parents can increase protection, even during outbreaks like we’re having right now, by getting their babies immunized on-time and as early as possible.
  • The not so good (but important) news: the effectiveness of the Tdap shot given to young teens (explained more below) doesn’t always provide long-lasting protection and wanes significantly in the years after the 11-year-old booster dose is given. New research out found after 1 year, about 70% of teens are still protected from the booster, but by 4 years after the shot only about a 1/3 of them are. More:

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Disneyland Success Story During Measles Outbreak

baby-O-e13075541951481There’s a beautiful story of success tucked away in the recent measles outbreak in the United States. Sometimes we forget to talk about it. When measles popped up at Disneyland in December 2014, it made headlines as the public remained thirsty for the media’s support in understanding who was at risk and why. I spoke to dozens of media outlets about the outbreak, under-vaccinated populations, the MMR vaccine, and how to protect those most vulnerable during an outbreak. We all emphasized those at biggest risk: infants too young to be immunized, those who were unvaccinated, or those too ill to be vaccinated. Measles is an illness I would be terrified to get — and I don’t like that people who aren’t protected are at risk for both catching the disease and spreading it. I think the public gets this in new ways although I hate that it takes outbreaks to capture attention and drive this education and understanding.

Measles virus, and the vaccine we have to prevent it, form a unique pair because although measles is wildly infectious and can be life-threatening the immunization is wildly effective and life-saving (>99% of those immunized are protected for life). It is a safe vaccine with minimal side effects. What a fortune and a triumph in prevention medicine. A terrible disease, once thought to be eradicated in the U.S., is swiftly prevented by a vaccine that nearly everyone in the population can get after their 1st birthday.

The beautiful story from the outbreak is this: Read full post »