Vaccines

All Articles in the Category ‘Vaccines’

Becoming an Impatient Optimist, One Mother’s Words

 Alok post photo


Today’s post is written by Dr Alok Patel, a third year resident at Seattle Children’s. I met him last year as he immersed himself in training. Since then we’ve been syncing up, learning together about ways he can use his voice, his teeming passion, and his media channels to improve the health of populations everywhere. He’s peppered with ideas, brimming with ent
husiasm (it’s possible he speaks faster than I do) and diligently working to carve out his path as a public advocate, storyteller, and pediatrician. He’s a self-described, “wannabe medical journalist [working] to bridge the gap between public health and everyday.” He’ll finish his training this summer and begin his career officially; I suspect we’ll hear lots from him. In the past year we’ve both attended powerful social media summits at The Gates Foundation. And we’ve both stepped away inspired to do more. Dr Patel is starting to tell his stories publicly. Take a peek at his story below – the final quote left me slightly breathless… 

Turn on the news these days and it’s easy to feel like the world is falling apart. Globally, people are suffering from different diseases and even though public health officials are making great strides internationally, I often find my self wondering “what can I do to help?” And then I get overwhelmed by the idea of where to start.

Last month I had the opportunity to attend the Gates Social on Science Innovation, a workshop that unites people with two common interests, a love for social media and desire to enhance global health. Surrounded by “impatient optimists,” a software engineer, film director, marine biologist and elementary school teacher I was struck by the fact that we all have innovative ideas… and we all need help getting them off the ground.

I can’t speak for the other attendees, but my “awakening” of sorts took place during a presentation of New York Times Columnist, Nicholas Kristof. He was discussing the variety of stories he’s told, from the harsh realities of child prostitution, to the innovative games that are teaching anti-parasite practices on your phone. Then he said something that really resonated with me. Read full post »

3 Shots: Protect Against Cancer

It’s 2014 and it’s a reality that you can protect a child, teen or young adult from a cancer-causing virus with a series of just three shots. About 79 million Americans are currently infected with Human Papillomavirus (HPV), a virus that can cause warts but also lead to cancer (anogenital and/or throat cancers). Most data find 14 million new people are infected with the virus every year. Most of the time, HPV enters our body and our immune system gets rid of it on its own, however sometimes HPV causes trouble at the cellular level. Fortunately there’s a safe and effective way to stop the spread of HPV, prevent some strains of the virus from ever causing cellular changes in our body and ultimately prevent the related cancers it triggers: the HPV vaccine.

HPV Vaccine Is Safe

The HPV vaccine isn’t really “new” anymore. Between June 2006-March 2014, approximately 67 million doses of HPV vaccines were distributed. The vaccine is made from one protein from the HPV virus, designed to trigger a protective immune response; the vaccine cannot cause HPV infection or cancer. A recent study by Pediatrics found the HPV vaccine to be not only effective, but long-lasting. The study followed vaccinated girls and boys for eight years and showed evidence of durability; the HPV-antibodies remained at high levels over the years after immunization. Read full post »

Ouchless Flu Vaccine In 2014-2015

Influenza spray finalIt’s Flu “shot” season but thankfully not every vaccine hurts going in. This year your child may be offered either the “flu shot” or the flu nasal spray vaccine (ouchless!). This year most nurses and docs will encourage young children to get a nasal flu spray over the shot as recent data has found the nasal flu vaccine protects younger children better. Every year the flu vaccine is created to protect against influenza viruses predicted to spread and circulate in North America. We need the shot every year for two main reasons:

  1. Typically, different influenza virus circulate around the world from year to year. Over 100 international centers maintain year-round surveillance to determine and predict which strain will cause human infections. The information is used to forecast the recipe for the vaccine here at home. This year the strains (types) of influenza in the shot and nasal spray are the same as last year (2013-2014).
  2. Protection Fades. When you get a flu vaccine you stimulate the immune system to create protection against the strains of the virus in the vaccine. That immunity (the antibodies that are created) tends to fade and wane in your bloodstream after about 6-12 months. Therefore, even if you got the flu vaccine last year you really want your family to have it again this year so it protects you through the winter influenza season which can continue late into the springtime but tends to peak in February or March.

The flu vaccine contains either three (trivalent) or four (quadrivalent) strains of influenza. There is no official recommendation for one over the other. Flu vaccine is recommended for all children over 6 months of age who have no contraindication to the vaccine.

Worth noting: If the thought of needles deters you from getting the vaccine for your child or your family, Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine (LAIV), a nasal spray, is a great option for those age 2 to 49 years. In fact, there’s data to suggest the nasal flu vaccine is more effective in protecting children from influenza in young childhood. Recommendations this year include a push to have children between 2 and 8 years of age immunized with the nasal spray whenever possible. If the nasal isn’t available, the shot should be given — no reason to wait.

About 20,000 children younger than 5 years old are hospitalized from flu every year  — form CDC “Which Flu Vaccine Should Children 2 to 8 Years Old Get?”

Information about nasal flu spray from CDC, Healthy Children and my “Debunking 5 Myths about the Flu

Who Can Get The Nasal Flu Vaccine?

Read full post »

Calling The Shots

Tonight, after President Obama speaks, PBS airs a NOVA documentary about vaccine science and safety. Vaccines: Calling The Shots. It’s told through the parent, pediatrician, and community lens. If you’ve ever wondered about vaccines in America, it’s time to tune in. I’ve been in touch with the team producing this documentary. Seriously excited to hear this story unfold tonight.

(update Sept 11: watch Calling The Shots online)

I think this is a big deal. This is an investigation on the science of vaccines.

The less the disease exists, the safer I am.

It’s a balancing act. The risks happen to be minuscule… the benefits are enormous

If inclined, follow a team of parents, pediatricians, and communities tonight on Twitter while it airs:  #vaccinesNOVA

Knowing The Benefit Of MMR Shot

A new study out today in Pediatrics reminds us that parents want information about the direct benefits shots have on their baby’s health and wellbeing. Not surprising, of course, but a good reminder for pediatricians, parents, and those who speak out on the value of vaccines to remember that primary motivation for parents in getting immunizations is to protect their child, not just protect the community. As a mom I feel the same way. As vaccination rates have decreased in pockets around the US these past few decades, and as non-medical vaccine exemptions (refusing immunization on philosophical grounds) increase, and as media coverage around the benefits of immunizing “the herd” remain a mainstay, returning to the individual benefit of vaccines makes sense. Parents really want to do what is best for their baby. They want to hear how and why to protect their baby. Vaccines do that.

The MMR vaccine protects your child from getting the diseases measles, mumps, or rubella or the complications caused by these diseases. After receiving this vaccine, your child will not miss school or activities due to these illnesses and will be able to play with friends during an outbreak.   — The message shared with parents in the research study

I like this study for two reasons:

  1. Parents Want To Know Why: In the study researchers went right to parents, mostly moms (80% of participants) between age 18 and 65 years of age, to share messages about MMR shot benefits to their baby and society and then gauged their intention to immunize their baby with MMR at 1 year of age. What I also really liked was the way the benefit was framed around a child’s wellness and their ability to play and be with friends!
  2. It Serves Up a Great Reminder:  We pediatricians, nurse practitioners, family docs, RNs, and MAs need to tell families what shots children are getting and we really need to stress WHY they are getting them in the context of life. We need to make the protection a shot provides relevant every time we order and administer the vaccine!

Pediatrics Study:

In the study, researchers compared about 800 parent responses in 4 groups (each group had about 200 parents). In one group parents got information only from CDC Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) about benefits/risks of MMR vaccine. In another group, parents got information about benefits of MMR shot to their baby and the VIS information. In a third group, parents got information about MMR benefit to baby and to population, along with VIS. And in the last group parents got information only about benefits of the shot for protecting the community along with the VIS.

Results: Parents were more likely to report their intention to get their infants the MMR shot when they heard about the benefit of the shot directly to their baby or when they heard about benefits directly to their baby and the population. When they heard only about risks/benefits of shot and risks/benefit to society, the information presented did not increase their intention to get the shot.

Conclusions: Parents are more likely to want to get their child up to date on immunizations if they know direct benefit on their child’s ability to go to school and play and be with friends.

Let’s focus on what matters to parents to young children when we talk about vaccine benefits — health, wellness, play, friendship, and opportunity.

For more on benefits of MMR shot for children and the diseases it prevents read here. Immunizations do cause optimism…

Something In The Air: It’s Measles

Something is in the air right now. There’s a strange mix of vaccine-preventable illness sweeping the country (measles) and a strange bump in media coverage for celebrities and vocal opponents to tested and recommended vaccine schedules. Part of me thought we might be done with that but pageviews, clicks, and views all sell.

My hope is the coincidence of coverage and outbreaks is just that, a coincidence. But as a mom, pediatrician, author and media reporter, the view from here is unsettling. We can’t prove that mishandled media coverage is changing the way we immunize our children (or at least I haven’t seen the data) and how parents protect them, but there are moments like this it feels it’s possible that trust is simply being eroded with this 24-hour online/TV/print news cycle. Parents might be vulnerable to bad medicine when gowned as good business. A couple of examples:

Two weeks ago Kristin Cavallari (a wife to an NFL player and reality TV star) went on Fox News to discuss her career (and parenting) and ended up discussing her theories on a group of vaccine refusers and autism. Perhaps talking about medical theories is a really good model for accelerating a career? Next up was Huffington Post where she dropped the bomb, “’I’ve read too many books’ to vaccinate my child.” I suspect she’s yet to read mine. Particularly chapter number 57 entitled Measles In America. Read full post »

2013-2014 Flu Is Here

Influenza December 2013

Influenza currently has widespread activity here in Washington and fortunately the news media has really picked up the story the last couple of days. I say fortunately, because as we know more about flu in our community, the better we can work to protect our families. There’s no question clinic was full of coughs and colds yesterday!

At of the end of last week, the CDC reported that 25 states in the US have widespread influenza (see above map). In addition, public health officials confirm that H1N1 Influenza A is causing more serious, sometimes deadly disease in young adults. This post is simply a reminder that flu is here in our communities, work, and schools. The best way to reduce the risk of serious influenza infection is still to get a flu shot. Particularly if you’re a middle-aged adult (!!), as young adults are bearing a particular burden of serious disease this season. In fact,there have already been a number of deaths in WA state. Many of the individuals who died were unvaccinated.

This is still true: pregnant women, young children, those over 65 years, and anyone with underlying medical conditions are at higher risk for serious infection from influenza. Read full post »

Yes, Vaccines Are Naturopathic!

Dr. Mary Alison HigiThis is a guest blog from Dr. Mary Alison Higi. Dr. Higi is a naturopathic physician in her final year of residency at Cascade Natural Medicine specializing in pediatrics under Dr. Candace Aasan. She studied at Bastyr University where she earned her Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine. She emphasizes the importance of the physician’s role in preventative medicine and public health. Dr. Higi has a special interest in implementing Naturopathic Medicine programs for under-served communities. 

I’m publishing this post because I think there is significant confusion about naturopathic physicians’ support of vaccines. I’m hoping this sheds a little light. Would love to learn more from you all about your experiences with naturopathic medical care and vaccines. Please leave comments!

 

 

I have frequently heard from parents, “You give vaccines? I thought you were a naturopath!” I can only reply, “Vaccination follows three of our most important guiding principles”

1. Premum non Nocere — First do no harm; weigh out risks and benefits and follow the least harmful path.
2. Docere — A physician should be a teacher to her patients.
3. Preventir — Practice preventative medicine.

By providing routine vaccinations to my patients I have the opportunity to help them weigh risks and benefits of vaccine preventable disease versus costly, painful and the often dangerous consequences of preventable infections.

When I counsel and give vaccines I get to teach about disease prevention and public health; I get to help patients prevent some truly life threatening diseases. So yes, vaccines are naturopathic! In that light, following our naturopathic principles, there are a few vaccination myths that I’ve heard so often, I feel compelled to dispel them:

Read full post »

Numbers For You On Flu

It’s time for flu shots. Winter respiratory season is on its way and, “The single best way to protect against flu is to be vaccinated every year.” Ideally your child (and you) will have had the flu shot at least 2 weeks prior to any exposure to the virus. If your infant, child, or teen hasn’t yet had their flu shot call today for an appointment. Waiting provides no added benefit and only increases the time a child is more susceptible to getting influenza this season.

Listen to the video for information on quadrivalent versus trivalent flu shots, options for nasal flu spray (NO POKES!), and new viruses included in this year’s flu shot.

Information For Parents Online: Protection from Flu Shots

Undervaccination

There isn’t a lot of research on children’s safety when a child is on an alternative vaccine schedule. While we clearly know that the longer you wait to immunize a child for vaccine-preventable illnesses, the longer the window of time a child is left susceptible, there isn’t a huge data set on children who are late to get shots or who are considered “undervaccinated.” Although it’s intuitive to think that a child who is not getting immunizations on time is at higher risk for infections (particularly during times of epidemics), it’s helpful when the science backs up our instinct and thinking.

This is likely something you already knew but there’s new research to compound our understanding.

Children Late On Shots Are At Risk For Whooping Cough

Recent pediatric research found that when it comes to whooping cough, children who were late on getting their shots are more prone to infection. In fact the more doses of the DTaP shot that a child misses, the more likely it is that they could be diagnosed with whooping cough.

A JAMA Pediatrics study published online in September 2013 evaluated children between 3 months to 36 months of age. During the first three years of life children are recommended to have 4 doses of the DTaP (Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis) shot starting at 2 months of age. In the JAMA matched case-control study children who were late on 3 doses of DTaP were 18 times as likely be diagnosed with whooping cough compared to children who were up to date on their shots. Children unvaccinated (missing 4 doses of DTaP) were 28 times more likely to be diagnosed with whooping cough when compared with fully vaccinated children.

The takeaway reminder? When you start a series of immunizations for your children, make sure you complete all shots in the series. Most experts believe children aren’t fully protected from whooping cough until they’ve received 4 doses of DTaP (at 15 months of age if on-schedule).

We have to finish what we start — another reason to get in on-time for well-care visits during the first few years of a your child’s life. And as a final note, the value of well-child care extends well past immunization.