Although this video feels a little bit like a video game (and takes you back to the 1970′s), it’s 1 minute of your life you don’t want to miss. Recommendations for CPR have changed this past decade. If you don’t have time to re-certify, take 1 minute and watch this video. Don’t ever be afraid to help immediately in a emergency situation where a teen or adult has potentially suffered a cardiac arrest. Channel your inner-John Travolta. Your actions can only help. Check out the American Heart Association CPR page for more. You can take a CPR class IRL (in real life) or online.

Bystander CPR dramatically improves survival from cardiac arrest, yet far less than half of arrest victims receive this potentially lifesaving therapy.

Parents who have learned how to do CPR are often more confident about their ability to manage an emergency of any kind. As a mom, I always feel more confident after reviewing these recommendations.

CPR For Infants & Children Is Similar But Different

Click on these links for drawings and nice summaries of CPR recommendations. Hands-only CPR is not recommended for children. However, the rate of compressions for infants and children also matches the Stayin’ Alive beat…

Instructions for Infant CPR (babies under 1 year of age)

  • If alone, start CPR for 2 minutes, and then call 911.
  • CPR consists of doing 30 chest compressions (with your fingers) and then 2 gentle, 1-second rescue breaths, then 30 compressions again. Repeat.

Instructions for Child CPR (children under 8 years of age) &  Video Explanation

  • If alone, start CPR for 2 minutes, and then call 911.
  • CPR ratio is 30 compressions for every 2 breaths. This is the same compression-to-breath ratio as infants. However, the position of your hands for compression is different.

If you’re local, you can take infant, child, or adult CPR classes at Seattle Children’s.