A new study out today in Pediatrics reminds us that parents want information about the direct benefits shots have on their baby’s health and wellbeing. Not surprising, of course, but a good reminder for pediatricians, parents, and those who speak out on the value of vaccines to remember that primary motivation for parents in getting immunizations is to protect their child, not just protect the community. As a mom I feel the same way. As vaccination rates have decreased in pockets around the US these past few decades, and as non-medical vaccine exemptions (refusing immunization on philosophical grounds) increase, and as media coverage around the benefits of immunizing “the herd” remain a mainstay, returning to the individual benefit of vaccines makes sense. Parents really want to do what is best for their baby. They want to hear how and why to protect their baby. Vaccines do that.

The MMR vaccine protects your child from getting the diseases measles, mumps, or rubella or the complications caused by these diseases. After receiving this vaccine, your child will not miss school or activities due to these illnesses and will be able to play with friends during an outbreak.   — The message shared with parents in the research study

I like this study for two reasons:

  1. Parents Want To Know Why: In the study researchers went right to parents, mostly moms (80% of participants) between age 18 and 65 years of age, to share messages about MMR shot benefits to their baby and society and then gauged their intention to immunize their baby with MMR at 1 year of age. What I also really liked was the way the benefit was framed around a child’s wellness and their ability to play and be with friends!
  2. It Serves Up a Great Reminder:  We pediatricians, nurse practitioners, family docs, RNs, and MAs need to tell families what shots children are getting and we really need to stress WHY they are getting them in the context of life. We need to make the protection a shot provides relevant every time we order and administer the vaccine!

Pediatrics Study:

In the study, researchers compared about 800 parent responses in 4 groups (each group had about 200 parents). In one group parents got information only from CDC Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) about benefits/risks of MMR vaccine. In another group, parents got information about benefits of MMR shot to their baby and the VIS information. In a third group, parents got information about MMR benefit to baby and to population, along with VIS. And in the last group parents got information only about benefits of the shot for protecting the community along with the VIS.

Results: Parents were more likely to report their intention to get their infants the MMR shot when they heard about the benefit of the shot directly to their baby or when they heard about benefits directly to their baby and the population. When they heard only about risks/benefits of shot and risks/benefit to society, the information presented did not increase their intention to get the shot.

Conclusions: Parents are more likely to want to get their child up to date on immunizations if they know direct benefit on their child’s ability to go to school and play and be with friends.

Let’s focus on what matters to parents to young children when we talk about vaccine benefits — health, wellness, play, friendship, and opportunity.

For more on benefits of MMR shot for children and the diseases it prevents read here. Immunizations do cause optimism…