Seattle Mama Doc

A blog by Dr. Wendy Sue Swanson.

A mom, a pediatrician, and her insights about keeping your kids healthy.

More Distaste For Chocolate “Formula”

More information on the chocolate and vanilla product from Enfamil being marketed as “formula” for Toddlers:
King 5 Children’s Healthlink:

This video is no longer available from King 5.

Community: On The Phone Or While On Twitter

Community can mean different things to each of us. Yesterday, a 3 year old came to see me in clinic. She must have been a little nervous about the visit. When I got into the exam room, I found her accompanied by her dad, 3 baby dolls in a stroller, and 2 on her back. You see, I think she felt quite a bit safer surrounded by her community. I was charmed. But then reminded. Community is a combination of the people, words, geography, support, and sometimes even sounds that surround us.

A study published last week demonstrated the calming effect of a mother’s voice. In the study, while completing a stressful task, 7 to 12 year old girls’ levels of cortisol (a stress hormone) rose in expected ways. You get stressed, your cortisol surges. But when comforted by their mother’s hug or their mother’s voice on the phone after the task was completed, levels of oxytocin (a hormone associated with bonding) soared while the stress hormone cortisol washed away. Girls who didn’t get to talk with their moms didn’t have this hormonal shift. Just the sound of a mother’s voice was enough to shift the stress response in these girls.

This data help confirm what we already know; hearing Mom’s (or Dad’s, I suspect) voice can simply make things feel better. Read full post »

Chocolate “Formula”: More Sugar Than A Pop-Tart

Enfamil just came out with chocolate and vanilla flavored “toddler formula.” I heard about it first on Twitter and have been following the reaction of moms, obesity experts, activists, and nutritionists over the past week or so. The online world is a-flutter with the news. If Enfamil produced the “formula” as an advertising gimmick, it worked. I hate this stuff.

Read more of my tips in the full post.  Read full post »

Guest Blog: “Image Gently” 5 Things You Can Do

Here’s The Husband. There is no ghost-writing, I promise. I’ve kept my hands tied behind my back for the past few days.

The Husband is a pediatric radiologist. He works at Children’s. He’s passionate about reducing the amount of radiation a child receives when they have any imaging. In the medical world, “imaging” includes x-rays, CT scans (“cat” scans), bone scans, MRI studies, ultrasound, and procedures like “swallow studies” and VCUGs. He’s real smart and has taught me why to reduce the number of x-rays and CT scans I obtain in my own clinic.

Our tale began when we met the first day of medical school. I went up to the physician lecturer and made a comment after a lecture on gun violence. Jonathan stood right behind me. He said, “Ditto to everything she said.”  I don’t think he’s ever said ditto again. Darn.

Read his guest post. You’ll learn ways to reduce radiation exposure for your children. I say, “Ditto to everything he said.”

Read full post »

My Mother’s Day

You know, I had a nice Mother’s Day. There was a picnic, some hugs, my sweet F saying, “Happy Mother’s Day, Mommy.” There were tulips and time with my boys. I had time alone with my mom. But it wasn’t simple. Even with the gourmet Seattle sunshine and the flowers in the grass for airplane rides, I really did spin through variant emotions as the day unfolded. I think a lot about parenting now that I write a blog. Fortunately, by the end of the day, at least for 2010, I think I knew what Mother’s Day meant to me.

Mother’s Day may be complex, especially for non-traditional families and for those whose lives are surrounded by illness or loss. This year was the first time I really got that. Read full post »

Mother’s Day Gift

I already got my Mother’s Day gift. It came in two parts this week. And it only cost $25.

It started on Wednesday. I had an over-scheduled day of meetings, my mom’s chemotherapy, a luncheon (that I ended up not making it to), blog stuff, patient calls, an interview for local PBS. I moved at a high rate of speed. All the things I did were utterly disparate. There were real highs and some real lows. Roller coaster stomach drops and jittery fingers is just the way I like life, it turns out.
I downshifted for the last event of the day where I met Kristin van Ogtrop, the editor of Real Simple magazine and author of a new book, Just Let Me Lie Down. I introduced myself, told her what I’m sure most everyone does, something like, “I love the pretty magazine…gosh it’s amazing to think about having things organized and lovely, polite and well-mannered…comparatively my house is a dump and I work crazy hours and I love my kids pants off every day.” She mentioned how her house really isn’t all Real-Simple-ized. She said it looks a lot like other peoples’ houses. She said she works a lot. She’s a mom, busied and pulled all sorts of ways.
Her arms looked remarkably well attached though.
Read full post »

Prepare

I’m gonna be honest, making a disaster kit completely stressed me out. I hope my experience will make it better for you. I’m no expert at this but have learned a lot along the way. And there is no question, I feel so much better with my family prepared and my preparedness tidied.

As The Economist said last week when discussing Iceland’s volcano, “Disasters are about people and planning, not nature’s pomp.”

Prepare.

I believe in the 3 tiered approach you see everywhere:

  • Make a Kit(detailed below and in my video)
  • Make a Plan (how to communicate and find your family)
  • Stay Informed (what disasters are likely to happen, where to find info)

If you watched the video, you know that Dr Suzan Mazor and I were totally overwhelmed by the task. Do your best to buddy up; having a partner was the best move I made. Hopefully she’d agree. Thanks again, Suzan. Please continue to be my friend despite me filming a video while sitting under a desk and having you help edit it at 11:30pm on a Friday night. Read full post »

Little Morsel: Go West

I’m going to share little morsels I read. This is morsel #1. I read this article while on vacation a week ago. I loved it. Only the abstract is available online today but if you feel you can pick up a New Yorker, do. If the full article becomes available online, I’ll redirect the link.

Although it doesn’t relate to pediatric health, it relates to telling stories. Which is what I do here.

Read Peter Hessler’s “Go West,” if you can. It’s not too long (like most in The New Yorker) and it’s chewy. I nibbled on the words and swallowed the images he creates.

Think running a marathon, learning the pronunciation of the state of Wyoming, and moving to Colorado. Think about Americans as storytellers. Think about moving back to the United States.

I think, next time I move, I want to hire the company he used in China.

Maybe you don’t even have to go on vacation to read it. How about during nap time?

O’s Tylenol is Famous: Medication Recall

We woke up today and I read the Tylenol, Motrin, Zyrtec, and Benadryl medication recall from yesterday. It’s a voluntary recall but concerns remain about quality of the medication.  Then I realized the Tylenol I gave O yesterday was still on the counter.

O’s Tylenol is famous, it turns out. It’s part of the recall. Medications on the recall list include: Infant Tylenol, Children’s Tylenol, Motrin, Zyrtec, and Benadryl.

Check the list and check your medicine cabinet.  Maybe you have a bottle of famous medicine, too.

Remember to look just above the medication name for the NDC number as seen in the photo. Then throw it out if you find a match. Call your pediatrician if you have any concerns.

O is fine……

Information for the McNeil product recall here.

Making a 3-Day Disaster Kit