Yesterday, the FDA put out a warning for parents regarding the risk of over-dose in infants receiving Vitamin D supplements. Seemingly scary, especially since nearly every infant is recommended vitamin D supplementation. But hold on a minute. As you likely know, I recommend giving 400IU (1 cc) of Vitamin D to all breast-fed and/or partially breast-fed infants every day. My blog posts about why and the research.

The FDA warning really gets to the heart of a bigger issue: how we understand dosing liquid medications as parents. So, let’s keep this warning in perspective. When you give Vitamin D to an infant (or your babysitter, nanny, or mother does), make sure you have a dropper with “1 cc” etched on the side. The warning is really rooted in how we use the tools we’re given to dose medications. This is a problem that crosses all education and socioeconomic lines. Particularly in the case of medications that can cause life threatening complications in an overdose situation. For example, when O was given pain medication for his broken leg last week in California, the Rx said: “Give 1/2 tsp every 6 hours.” But the pharmacist gave us a 5 cc syringe. Would you know what to do? The husband had to double check…

I was a middle school science teacher; in the spirit of safety (playing along?) please do the pop quiz below. Post your responses to the questions. Be bold. And as I told my 9th-grade science students in Oakland some 10+ years ago, if you think the test is easy, “Well, good for you.”

Answers will arrive later today with rationale & explanations of why I am forcing you to do this. Now, get out your #2…

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Pop Quiz: Conversions & Other Necessary Info For Giving Meds To Children

#1 How many cc are in a mL?

#2 How many mL in a teaspoon?

#3 Without looking it up, tell me how you’d give your child 1 1/2 teaspoons of medicine using a 5 cc syringe the pharmacist gave you?

#4 If the doctor told you to give your child 1 tsp of medicine, twice a day, for 10 days, and the pharmacist gave you 100 cc of medicine, will you have enough?

#5 Your pediatrician tells you to give your child 1/2 tsp of Children’s Motrin for pain. You loose the cap on the top of the bottle. You pull out a teaspoon from the silverware drawer. Filling up half way will likely work. Yes or No?

#6 Your pediatrician tells you to give your child 1/2 tsp of Children’s Motrin for pain. You loose the cap on the top of the bottle. You pull out a set of measuring spoons from the drawer. You pick the “1/2 teaspoon” spoon. Will this work?  Yes or No?

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