‘development’

All Articles tagged ‘development’

Father’s Day: Two Wheels Of Their Own

We had a marvelous Father’s Day weekend. On Saturday we started a Dad-coached soccer team with some friends which was surprisingly successful. And then on Sunday, we completed our first-ever family bike ride on the Burke-Gillman trail. Everyone had two wheels of their own, including Grandma. Although O ended up in the ditch at one point after steering off-course, it was an injury-free ride and we proclaimed it a success. I think we all felt really grown up. We gave my husband a mixture of homemade gifts (paintings) and then a trite, expected one (a necktie). We played ball in the yard, pulled weeds from the grass, and Jonathan got a bit of time to himself for a run. When we went out for Italian food and ordered Shirley Temples we formally celebrated the fortune of having a father parenting so actively in our lives. The boys began the day with exclamations and closed it with a final, “Happy Father’s Day” after the lights went out. It was then that I realized it’s prime time for this holiday in our home.

I get that Father’s Day isn’t this Hallmark in everyone’s home and I certainly understand it won’t always be like this. These manufactured holidays bring up thoughts of the tension and distance many of us feel from our own fathers. I also think about my friends and patients who have lost their fathers and those children who are separated from their fathers due to work, military commitments, or unique family circumstances. Last week one of my colleagues pointed out that children had eras in their lives where Father’s Day was on the map; young children adore and celebrate but then retreat as we’d expect during the late school-age years. “They tend to check back in during young adulthood,” he said.

And it got me thinking: is there a way to keep the intimacy of preschool-parenthood alive? Read full post »

Surviving Separation Anxiety

Separation anxiety varies WIDELY between children. Some babies become hysterical when Mom is out of sight for a very short time, while other children seem to demonstrate ongoing anxiety at separations during infancy, toddlerhood, and preschool. I’ve got one of each in my home. The trick for surviving separation anxiety demands preparation, brisk transitions, and the evolution of time. I would suggest we parents suffer as much as our children do when we leave. Even though we are often reminded that our children stop crying within minutes of our leave-taking, how many of you have felt like you’re “doing it all wrong” when your child clings to your legs, sobs for you to stay, and mourns the parting? As a working mom, separation anxiety creates questions for me. Although it is an entirely normal behavior and a beautiful sign of a meaningful attachment, separation anxiety can be exquisitely unsettling for us all. Here are facts about separation anxiety and 6 tips to improve the transitions I’ve learned the hard way (I’ve made about every mistake). Read full post »

18 Months: Seattle Mama Doc 101

18 month-olds are extremely determined,  constantly challenging, tenacious, adorable, witty, and ever-aware. By 18 months, most babies have really figured out how to get and hold a parent’s attention! As they explore their widening world, an 18 month-old’s curiosity leads while their judgment lags well behind. Providing your child with a safe and consistent environment is paramount. Development in all areas (gross motor, personal and social, fine motor, etc) is highly variable but the video reviews typical milestones your baby’s clinician will review around 18 months of age.

What Should My Baby Do At 18 Months?

In general by 18 months, your toddler will be very curious. They will be demanding. They will be communicating wants and needs through words, motions, and imitations. They will be pointing out objects in the sky. They will be calling you by a name just as they run the opposite way…

 18 month milestones

“Mr No” – I found this extensive list of milestones and observations both very entertaining and educational

What Parents Can Do For 18 Month-Olds:

  • Give your 18 month-old their space. As they crave more and more autonomy, provide them times for a bit of freedom.
  • Let your child mimic you. Give them toys or safe objects you use in the house so that they can pretend to be an adult.
  • Let them help. Start finding daily or weekly “chores” for your 18 month-old (ie bringing napkins to the table or moving stuffed animals to a bin). They’ll love their role!
  • Offer puzzles, matching, and sorting games.
  • Read to your 18 month-old every single day. Point out objects in the book. Ask your toddler to tell you the names of animals or toys in the book. Get them involved. And get ready to read the same book over and over and over again!
  • Keep rules to a minimum. Rather, define “right” from “wrong” for your child and remember to praise your 18 month-old for doing things right. Catch them when they are being good!

Fast-Paced Media And 4 Year-Olds: Cartoons On The Brain

A new study, along with an incredible editorial, was published today in Pediatrics about the effects of watching fast-paced cartoons on the attention and working memory of 4 year-olds. It’s basically a Spongebob versus Crayola versus Caillou show-down. At least it feels that way in the media summaries today. And thus, it’s bound to hit the front pages of every parent’s windshield. First and foremost, it’s a genius study for getting the word out and attracting media attention–media love to talk about media. Especially when it comes to the effects on children; all forms of media are looking for a viable option for longevity. There is just so much competition now.

Also, the study is interesting. Plain and simple, I couldn’t wait to read it. We watch Caillou around here and my husband and I like to dissect and ridicule it (in private)–everything from the outfits to the color scheme to the lessons. As a parent, it’s kind of painful to watch–its just so utterly wholesome and slow. On the flip side because of this goodness in the the content and pace, we feel less “guilty” letting the boys watch it. The result has been a win-win: the boys looooooove it–I mean, love it–and we pat ourselves on the back for the choice. Good media is far better than bad media, we think. Fortunately, the data backs up our instinct. And this helps with our mommy-daddy-guilt. We’re a really low media viewing house, but not the lowest. We have friends whose children don’t see a screen for months at a time. Read full post »

What Can Babies Do At 12 Months? Seattle Mama Doc 101

I found my sons’ first birthdays very emotional. Magical, even. Looking back provided great perspective on how much can happen in 1 year of time. What our children accomplish in the first 12 months is simply astonishing.

Expected milestones at 1 year of age:

AAP’s comprehensive summary of 12 Month Milestones

CDC’s Important Milestones By The End of 1 Year (English & Spanish)

Potty Training: Reward Chart Glory

Maaaaaaajor milestone in our house today. O filled up his first reward chart for potting training. Even bigger, last night just before he went to bed, O and I discussed that he only had two spaces left on the chart. Once filled, he gets a special trip to the toy store. Although seemingly unclear about the rules and benefits of the chart last night, he told me he would wait until morning to pee.

Thing is, he did.

He awoke with a dry diaper. We felt like lottery winners! O went to the bathroom, peed in the toilet, and then came to find me this morning. His 4 1/2 year old brother did the reporting:

“O peed much more than we thought he could this morning, Mommy.”

I was astonished. I went to the toilet to see the evidence. Dark yellow bowl of pee. Immense pride….I think my heart pushed out a double-beat. Read full post »

Seattle Mama Doc 101: 3 Month Developmental Milestones


For more information:

Please leave additional topic ideas and suggestions for the Seattle Mama Doc video series as comments at Seattle Mama Doc 101: Introduction.

Seattle Mama Doc 101: When is a Child Ready for a Cellphone?

On May 16, 2011 Reader Jenny asked: ” What is the developmentally appropriate time to allow kids to have cell phones?”

Thank you Jenny for your suggestion. If you have a question or topic suggestion for the Seattle Mama Doc 101 video series please leave a comment here.

Autism Screening At 1 Year Check Up?

A recently published study proposed and evaluated a new autism screening checklist for the 1-year well baby check-up. I had a hard time getting my hands on the study (crazy but true–even pediatricians sometimes are boxed out of research studies), but read lots about it first in the press. I was excited about the potential for early screening. The checklist, designed to be administered by a pediatrician, intends to improve early detection and diagnosis of autism. The goal: to enable early intervention and treatment for at-risk children. It’s clear that early intervention improves autistic children’s outcome with autism spectrum disorders but the media may have provided false information and false hope. So before you expect this checklist at your baby’s next 1-year check up, let me explain what the study found, my concerns about the results, and how the checklist may become useful.

I take care in using any screening tool–any intervention can cause unnecessary harm. My main concern resides around false positives (when a test suggests there is a problem when in reality there isn’t) and the numbers from this study… Read full post »

Pull Ups and Potty Training

My take on Pull Ups: get out of them as soon as possible! Easier said than done, of course.
Bed wetting is a common challenge for children (and their families). If your child is wetting the bed you certainly know that may be the understatement of the week. You’re not alone in your struggle to help your child stay dry at night, even if it feels that way at times. Know this, I talk about bed wetting every single week in clinic.

Bed wetting is familial and fortunately, often improves simply with time. Watch the video for more information, but the cliff notes: although Pull Ups are convenient, at times they may hinder and prolong bed wetting. If your child is potty trained but wears a Pulls Up/diaper at night, never having tried a night without them, there may be less incentive to potty train. Achieving nighttime dryness demands connecting their brain with their bladder. If there is a diaper on, there may be less motivation to form this connection.

Of course, achieving full potty training success is a huge milestone in every child’s life. It’s a big one for most parents, too. Remember, bed wetting is seen in up to 40% of 3 year-olds, 20% of 5 year-olds and even 10% of 6 year-olds. Watch the above video for my take on Pull Ups and ways to support your child, when ready, to ditch them.

Potty Training and Pull Ups, DO:

  • Try to get out of the Pull Up from time to time. Don’t force it, but if you child is interested in giving it a try without one, do it!
  • Set your child up for success: limit fluids after bedtime, consider waking them to pee at 10 or 11pm, and light the path to the potty so they know how to get there in a hurry.
  • Tell your child it’s not their fault for wetting the bed.
  • Tell your child if one of their parents was a bed wetter. Chances are, they were! Provide them support.
  • Celebrate success whenever it happens (any dry nap, dry night, less pee than usual, getting from the bed to the potty in the middle of the night).

Potty Training and Pull Ups: DON’T:

  • Don’t punish a child for wetting the bed. Even when you’re uber frustrated cleaning the sheets for the one hundredth time, to do your best to hide disappointment when your child wets the bed. This will only increase your child’s anxiety and frustration.
  • Don’t assume your child can’t make it through the night without a Pull Up. If they are dry during the day and dry during naps, I’d certainly give it a try without them.
  • Don’t force your child out of diapers or Pull-Ups if they resist. If resistance arises, back off and try again in a few weeks or month’s time.