‘formula’

All Articles tagged ‘formula’

When Should I Start Baby Food?

first foodsWhen to start baby food? The timing on starting baby food may seem confusing. If you survey your neighbors, your own moms, the doctors you see, and the child care or daycare providers who help you, I bet you’d get about 4 different answers backed with 4 different theories and rationales. The reason is, the pendulum on when and how to start baby food has changed. Bits and pieces of old data mixed with contrasting new research findings are getting tossed around. Most new parents I talk with are a bit puzzled on what is truly best.

It’s okay to start your baby on baby foods or “complementary foods” when they show signs of readiness if they are at least 4 months of age. Signs of readiness include watching you eat (following your spoon’s every movement at a meal), lip smacking and licking when they smell food, and opening their mouths when you present them with a spoonful of food. Most babies ready to eat have also doubled their birth weight and started cooing and laughing, sitting up with assistance, and rolling over.

I used to advise families to wait until 6 months to start baby foods but new research over the last couple of years has caused me to change my tune. Read full post »

Mix And Match: Goldilocks Formula

Often new parents are nervous about mixing and matching infant formula they offer their babies. They worry if they switch from one formula brand to another, they may cause their baby fussiness, stool changes, upset or worse–that they could put their baby at risk.

It’s safe to mix and match infant formulas if you are following standard mixing instructions. Really.

Although spitting up or gassiness is usually not due to the protein in formula (cow’s milk versus soy versus hypoallergenic), sometimes changing formula helps new babies and their parents who worry. Switching them up can even help clarify worries in some scenarios when a parent worries about excessive gassiness, intolerance, or significant urping or spitting up.

Experimentation with formula brands in an otherwise healthy newborn is okay. But it’s not necessary at all, either.

It’s fine to make a bottle that is ½ formula from the blue can and ½ formula from the yellow one. Fine to serve Simulac one week, Enfamil the next, Earth’s Best or Goodstart followed by Soy formula the following day. Fine to buy one brand that’s on sale only to buy the other brand next week. Read full post »

Mama Doc 101: Introduction of Solids

If It Were My Child: No Baby Food Before 4 Months

Last week news of a study evaluating the timing of solid food introduction for infants emerged. It got a ton of press because the study evaluated the timing of solids on the likelihood of obesity at 3 years of age. Researchers divided babies into 2 groups, those that received partial or full breast milk until 4 months, and those that were weaned from breast milk and received formula exclusively before 4 months of age. Researchers then determined when babies were given solid food (rice cereal, biscuit, pureed “baby” food, etc) of any kind.

The results proved notable. Babies who received exclusive formula and solid foods before 4 months of age were 6 times more likely to be obese as a 3 year-old (defined as BMI over 95%, sum of triceps and subscapular skinfolds). This however, was not true for the babies that were receiving breast milk of any kind. So this study may not be applicable to many babies; in the US for example, 25% of infants are never breastfed and approximately half are breastfed for less than 4 months. Yet still, this sheds light on what we can do to help. Use this data when Grandma Trudy is urging you to feed your infant cereal at 3 months. Or why it’s best to wait until 4 months when you get excited about starting solids. Those of you who didn’t wait? Before you spin your wheels with worry about that bite of rice cereal you gave your baby at 3 1/2 months, read on. Because although, if it were my child, I wouldn’t give baby food before 4 months, there may be more to consider when it comes to timing. Read full post »

Breast Feeding vs Formula: Mommy Sleep

Loved a study published today in Pediatrics. Researchers sought to determine if mothers who breastfed slept less than those who formula fed their babies. I hear lots of talk (at birthday parties to office visits) about how formula or rice cereal creates better infant sleepers. So far, science doesn’t back up these claims. But as every new mom (and dad) knows, sleep is the major commodity during your infant’s first 6-12 months. We really want our babies to sleep through the night. Desperately. Six weeks in, crying is at a peak for infants and mothers are utterly exhausted after a pregnancy, a labor/delivery, and a month or so of very fragmented and dwindling sleep. Not only are we at peace when our babies sleep, we often rest, too. Maternal rest is essential for familial functioning, enjoyment of a baby’s infancy, and simple recovery. Sleep is not just about feeling rested or perceiving that you get more (or less) sleep than the other baby’s mothers on the block. It is about wellness, too. The study asserts that, “a growing body of evidence shows that mothers may not, in fact, do fine with less sleep.” Maternal sleep may affect rates of postpartum depression and an infant’s emotional and cognitive outcome. Getting rest is something we actually CRAVE in the first few months of our baby’s lives. Sleep, at some point, has to be a priority.

Researchers in West Virginia wanted to figure out if mothers of formula fed babies got a better night of sleep compared to those who breast fed or partially breast fed. The motivation behind the study was to dispel any perceived disadvantage of breastfeeding. Before you get up in arms about how bad your night sleep was while breast feeding compared to baby Jane next door who was chugging formula, look at what they did. Sometimes understanding how a study was performed helps you interpret how much weight you put into the results. Read full post »

Similac Powdered Formula Recall: Gross But Not Dangerous

Worth mentioning: There is a large Similac powdered formula recall. It’s not dangerous, but gross. ICK. Ick, Ick, Ick.

The FDA announced today that Abbott (who makes the formula) voluntarily recalled formula due to concerns about bug contamination. Yup, bugs. Beetles and Beetle larvae in the powdered formula. The recall involves powdered formula made by Similac:

  • Certain Similac powder product lines offered in plastic containers.
  • Certain Similac powder product lines offered in sizes such as 8-ounce, 12.4-ounce and 12.9-ounce cans.

The recall states that babies could have a bit of tummy upset (GI distress) or refuse a bit of formula if they ate contaminated samples. I’m not worried at this point about harm or danger for infants drinking this formula. The stomach acid (& pH) and GI tract of a baby can likely handle this without any trouble.  Instead, it’s a disgusting reminder that when we don’t make food ourselves, we remain vulnerable to companies who do, to keep and hold high standards of safety and hygiene.

If more information unfolds that is alarming or worrisome, I will update this post.

I read lots of reports on Twitter and online proclaiming this is a great reminder to breastfeed. I agree, offering breast milk will never involve a recall. But I will say this (and loudly): some of us had or have a difficult time making enough milk for our babies. Sometimes parents offer formula because they need to, not because they choose to. THIS IS NOT ANOTHER REASON TO FEEL GUILTY. Just a reason to check your can of formula if you have Similac lying around and follow recall instructions. Don’t let this shake you.

Online sources of information about the formula recall:

Call your pediatrician with any further questions, although I doubt you’ll need to.

Thoughts?

More Distaste For Chocolate “Formula”

More information on the chocolate and vanilla product from Enfamil being marketed as “formula” for Toddlers:
King 5 Children’s Healthlink:

This video is no longer available from King 5.

Chocolate “Formula”: More Sugar Than A Pop-Tart

Enfamil just came out with chocolate and vanilla flavored “toddler formula.” I heard about it first on Twitter and have been following the reaction of moms, obesity experts, activists, and nutritionists over the past week or so. The online world is a-flutter with the news. If Enfamil produced the “formula” as an advertising gimmick, it worked. I hate this stuff.

Read more of my tips in the full post.  Read full post »