‘health care’

All Articles tagged ‘health care’

Simplifying Health Care

StrikeWe all want simple solutions to living a healthy life.

It feels like I was born at just the right time for my work in health care. I completed my medical training just as social tools were percolating out to the masses. Motherhood and my practice of pediatrics auspiciously coincided with the bounty of information that technology has distributed, offered up, and shared unlike ever before.

I can search and learn about health wherever I am –  at the park or in the walls of my own clinic or home. For me, using my phone, Twitter, my blog, apps, Facebook, activity tracker, and patient online communities to provide health care, consume it, and engage in it is my new reality. It turns out, amidst all the clutter and stress of health care reform and our reduced time with our own doctors I can see clearly that intuitive ways of learning about science wed with thoughtful technology will let us care, cure, and prevent illness and injury like never before.

A survey published today finds that more that 3/4 of moms search online for symptoms. The majority of mothers in the US also look up information regarding their child’s development online, read about a medicine, or track their pregnancy with online tools. I’ve done, or do, all of those things. Don’t you?

I’ve just started a new job in the hospital overseeing a group in Digital Health. Our goal is to rapidly improve the way we serve children and their family’s unique needs in the hospital, clinical setting, and community. I want to help facilitate elegant communication between parents, patients, families, and their clinicians & surgeons when they are outside the hospital or clinic. Reason is: it seems to me that the luxury of our time is the one-to-many communication we have in our pockets. Over 60% of all American adults have a smartphone in their pocket and  crowd-sourcing happens at virtual water coolers (ie Facebook) every day. Over 40% of Americans log onto Facebook everyday to listen, lurk, snoop, learn, and vet ideas. Read full post »

Beads Of Courage

beads of courageI met Lowie backstage, about an hour before my own talk earlier this month. I had butterflies in my stomach for all sorts of reasons. I’d read about him prior to arriving and perused the blog he’s written about his daughter’s cancer and his family’s journey during her life and death (you can have Google translate it into English). It was so nice to meet him.

I was really looking forward to his talk although a part of me knew I’d need to brace myself, dig fingernails deep into my legs and let my throat tighten when he started to speak. I knew his words would fill my eyes with tears.

His story detailing Guusje’s voice and needs during her cancer treatment did, of course, cause me to cry. But the images he shared also gave me great hope. Learning about his daughter’s life implored me to share his lessons. I realized we could share the beads of courage widely and put these beads in the hands of other families everywhere. You know we can learn a lot from those in the Netherlands — they did just top this list from UNICEF for child well-being for the wealthiest countries on planet Earth.

Beads of Courage

In the Netherlands when a child is diagnosed with cancer, they immediately spell out their name with beads and then chronicle their courage each and every day in order on a string. Each day of chemo, each radiation treatment, each terrible, bad day (green), and each good day gets documented, strung up in line, and valued. A ledger and journal of the courage a child maintains as they fight for life.

To me it seems obvious that these beads of courage can represent a child’s endurance, perseverance, experience, and will. A hand-held way for a child to see where they are and where they’ve been. Yet reflecting on and re-watching Lowie’s talk I realized that more, these beads can represent the wishes and life experience of a child who courageously fights for life during a chronic or life-threatening disease in a health care environment.

These beads can be a tactile acknowledgement of  humanism  in health care. Read full post »

Affordable Care

It’s hard to write about anything else today with news from The Supreme Court: the decision to uphold the Affordable Care Act. As a pediatrician and mom this isn’t about politics for me. It’s about the assurance that pediatric patients (my children included) can get the care they need. And that we work to make care affordable. Below are a few thoughts & quotes that have helped me understand how the decision will affect care for our children in the United States.

First off, more children will have access to health care. Children will maintain insurance for longer periods of time. And children who have congenital and chronic health conditions won’t lose their care. The majority ruling preserves key child health provisions including the law’s protections against pre-existing condition exclusions. Dr Robert Block, President of the American Academy of Pediatrics said:

Since the Affordable Care Act took effect, millions of children with pre-existing conditions gained health care coverage; 14 million children with private insurance received preventive health services with no co-pay; and 3.1 million more young adults gained coverage through their parents’ plans. These are just a few of the law’s investments in child health, with many more set to take effect over the next few years as affirmed by today’s decision. Read full post »

A Dr, Patient, And An Insurer Walk Into A…

When I was a medical student and resident physician, those around me taught me how to distrust the pharmaceutical industry and how to distrust the insurance companies. The drug companies just wanted the public to buy their medications (to get rich) and the insurance companies just wanted to block services for my patients (to get rich).

The more I learn as a physician, the more I realize how little I know.

The great thing about the extensive travel I’ve been enduring lately is that I learn to see the world differently. This week I participated on a panel at SXSW (called: A Dr, Patient, & Insurer Walk Into A Social Network) where I had the opportunity to share my thoughts as a doctor alongside a patient advocate/technologist and an insurer.

The technologist sees the world like this:

We envision a world where information exchange between patients, doctors, pharmaceutical companies, researchers and the healthcare industry can be free and open; where, in doing so, people do not have to fear discrimination, stigmatization or regulation; and where the free flow of information helps everyone.  We envision a future where every patient benefits from the collective experience of all, and where the risk and reward of each possible choice is transparent and known.

The Insurer sees the world like this:

We believe we can help create a better health care system. This belief drives our daily decisions as one of the nation’s leading health care benefits companies. We work hard to provide our members with information and resources to help them make informed decisions about their health.

Read full post »

Mommy Daddy Days

For the last month or so O has woken up every single morning with the same question:

“Is today a Mommy Daddy Day?”

What he means is, “Is this a weekend where I get the day with both of you?”

The answer, less than 2/7 of the time, is unfortunately “No.” And on some level it kills me. I don’t usually only say, “No” when he asks, I usually end up marketing the day. It goes something like, “No, but the great thing is today you get to go to school and you have swimming lessons. Or, “Today you get to go to the zoo with the nanny and make thank you cards. Or, “Today is a Daddy Day!”

It weighs on me. O is extremely attached and has been since day (before) one. I often think about how he’s as attached as I am. F on the other hand adores his independence.

I traveled all week and fortunately mid-week from Florida I face-timed with the boys. It was delicious really, and settled my aching heart in spite of the fact that the first thing O said when he saw my face was, “Come home, Mommy!”

Being a working parent tugs on us in bizarre ways. But it also elevates us. And as I spent the week crossing the country giving lectures, I was reminded of my strong sense of purpose. My need to speak up and improve the world for my children. The need to scream from the roof tops about revolutionizing health communication. I mean what I say and I believe in what I do. And while the boys thrive, this equation of clinical responsibility and working to change health care, works. The only problem is that this week O might have missed me as much as I did him. I would suggest this new reality is not entirely ideal.

Read full post »

Speaking Up In The Exam Room

I was in a cab yesterday afternoon. I’m at another conference this week and as I made my way to San Diego, I had to count on many people to keep me safe. From the pilot to the air traffic controller to the cab driver. We do this all of the time, of course–step into a moving vehicle, sit down, inform another person where we’d like to go and then just trust. Trust that they know how to drive, that they’ll take care of us, that they’ll do their best to remain aware, responsive, and agile in the face of unexpected events. We trust that they’ll keep us alive and return us to our children. We do this at the clinic and at the hospital, too.

As I sat in the back of the car, I noticed a sticker on the window describing the bill of rights for passengers for San Diego Airport cabs. The list detailed things I was due: a safe car, a working seat belt, a music-free ride for example. And the kicker, a driver who doesn’t talk on the cell phone.

Read full post »

I’m A Physician On Twitter: Patient Privacy

On Monday night, Dr Bryan Vartabedian, a pediatric gastroenterologist in Texas, wrote a blog post about physician behavior on Twitter. In the world of health and social media, it’s caused a near nuclear explosion of thought, an outpouring of opinion, and most importantly a much-needed discussion. Discourse is perfect for progress.

I think about this all the time.

In the post, Doctor V called out an anonymous physician blogger and tweeter, (@Mommy_Doctor), on her tweets about a patient suffering from an embarrassing and painful medical condition. Nearly 100 comments later and numerous other blog posts, physicians and patients are openly battling and exchanging perspectives.

I wonder, what do you think? I rarely write about patients directly. More, I write about what I learn from patients. I never want a patient or family member to stumble upon anything I write and wonder if I’m writing about them. When I have written about patients, I have asked permission and even then, waited for a period of time before writing about them to avoid the time-stamp the internet provides. Read full post »

Tweet This, Cut That: Live Twitter Feed From The OR

Twurgery?

On the right side of my screen I’m watching a live Twitter feed from Swedish Hospital in Seattle.

Tweeting commenced soon after 8am this morning and was performed by 4 observers in an operating room in Seattle. Those 4 observers were in the presence of a surgical team who was performing a tumor resection on the kidney of a 69 year-old patient from California. The man had consented to the scenario, surgery, observers, twittering and all. While the surgeon did his job, his maneuvers, goals, and timed procedures were detailed on Twitter in a live feed.

It’s 10am on Wednesday as I write. I’m watching the twitter feed populate into my screen.

I must say it gives me an eerie feeling.

During medical school I assisted (translation: watched in awe and was likely told to be quiet) on a nephrectomy (removal of one entire kidney) for the same reason—a kidney mass. I remember well what the surgery looked like. This is the first time I know what it tweets like. Read full post »