‘newborn’

All Articles tagged ‘newborn’

Let Us Break The Silence on Stillbirth

This is really beautiful. There’s little to say other than we can do a better job supporting parents in their loss and in the celebration of their children’s life and legacy.

Watch this and enjoy the amazing amount of love you will feel…

“I want the baby I didn’t have.”  “I feel like a bad luck charm around other moms.”

“I couldn’t understand why that happened to me…”

“His life was a good thing.”   “People say really sad, crazy things.”

“We said don’t come and they came….that was what we needed.”

“I love to tell people about my son…I don’t get enough chances to talk about him.”

“His life was a good thing.”

“I’m not afraid to mention him.”  “Why don’t they tell you about it?”

“You second guess everything you did, everything you didn’t do.”

“I don’t want another baby. I want the baby that I didn’t have.”

“I love to tell people about my son… I just don’t get enough chances to talk about him.”

Cocoon A Newborn, Only An Email Away

This week, Washington State declared that whooping cough (pertussis) has reached epidemic levels. Since the beginning of the year, we’ve had more than 600 documented cases in the state, a dramatic increase since last year. The increase puts our new babies at risk.

In clinic I’ve been urging new parents to cocoon their babies. That is, provide a family of protection by having every single child & adult immunized against whooping cough, influenza, and other vaccine preventable illnesses. By surrounding a baby with only immunized people, you cocoon them against serious infections.

Whooping cough is a highly infectious respiratory illness spread by sneezing and coughing that can be deadly to young infants. Getting a Tdap shot is the best way to avoid getting whooping cough. Amidst an epidemic, we worry most about newborns because they are most vulnerable to complications and lack vaccine-protection. If every child and adult that surrounds a newborn gets a Tdap shot, the likelihood of the baby getting whooping cough approaches zero.

Most newborns get whooping cough from their family or adults around them. That’s where an email comes to play.

You’re going to have to be fairly Mama-Papa-Bear about this. You’ll have to show some strength to create a very safe home, even when it feels somewhat over-the-top. As I said to a number of families in clinic today, “It only seems entirely over-the-top-nuts until we lose another newborn to pertussis.” Being smart now will save lives.

Make a new rule: no visits with a newborn until all visitors have had the Tdap shot. Even Grandparents.

Write an email to family and friends to explain.

A sample email for you to use/copy/share –written today by a friend of mine–mother to that darling baby girl born last week: Read full post »

Colic, Crying, And The Period of PURPLE Crying

Every infant cries. It’s a part of being a newborn, yet infant crying still puts many of us on edge. As parents, we want to calm our babies and prevent crying; it’s simply instinctive to want to make it go away. The period of time when our babies cry most (between 1-2 months of age) can be entirely exhausting, unsettling, and unnerving. As we transition into parenthood, one of the most difficult challenges can be learning to soothe our crying newborns. One expert, Dr Ron Barr, refers to this period of crying as the PURPLE period. I’ll explain, but first, let’s talk a bit about colic and news today about using alternative “folk” treatments, and ultimately what it may mean when someone, a doctor or not, tells you that you’ve got a “colicky” baby.

This morning I did an interview for Good Morning America Health about a Pediatrics systematic review evaluating 15 large studies (including nearly 1000 babies) to determine if things like infant massage, probiotics, chiropractor’s manipulation, herbal supplements, and sugary/glucose solutions really helped “colicky” babies stop crying. The results proved unfortunate. No, these interventions don’t tend to help infants who are crying/fussy/screaming their heads off. Two things to think about with the new findings: first, when you’re frustrated with a baby’s fussing/crying, don’t reach for these remedies as solutions or as “cure alls.” As we know it now, there’s not a lot of evidence to use any of these remedies. Secondly, don’t confuse the word “natural” with “harmless” or “safe.” Many of these herbal and complementary remedies come with labels that say “natural.” Natural doesn’t confer safety. Some limitations of interpreting data from the 15 studies reviewed was the reality that little time was spent reporting side effects to interventions and therapeutics. It may simply be because there were few, but researchers are unsure. We only want to use medications in infants that prove effective.

The most important thing to do for a fussy infant is to find ways for you to soothe your baby. But know that you won’t always be successful. Read full post »

Two Minutes To Represent Vaccines?

Last Friday I was in line for a coffee and met a newborn baby. Her father asked me if “I believed in vaccines.” I answered him (hint: I do). But then I got to thinking…how could I have done it better? I wrote some friends…

To Cry It Out or Not To Cry It Out…

Sleep. We’d all love a little. Especially once we have children.
How have you, did you, or will you help your baby (and you!) sleep through the night?

Everyone has an opinion. Really, one opinion is rarely better than another. It’s one of those beautiful parenting truths where often, we’re all a little “right.”

Watch this segment from KCTS with insights from me and from sleep expert, Elizabeth Pantley.

Helping Your Baby Sleep: Follow Your Instincts & Follow Through

Video Take 1

As promised, this is my first video post. It’s 11:30pm Sunday night. It took a while to coordinate. This was take number 2. I waited for the sun (going against my previous post about when NOT to work) as that cloudy Friday light was too drab. Especially for sleep deprived parents. This afternoon it was sunny; proof that Seattle-ites really do see the sun.

This is a post about sleep. How to help your baby (and you) get more of it. What to do when you don’t know what sleep routine or method to follow. Which books to listen to and which to pass on to your friends.

There is no universal truth or method that is good for all parents. Rather, each sleep book or method caters to certain parenting styles and certain baby temperaments. The method you choose is less important than how you implement it. Consistency is essential in helping your baby sleep through the night. Pick a plan and follow through.

Read this summary of expert advice on interpreting sleep methods and talk with your pediatrician if you get confused. Or tired. Or both. And watch this video (click on full post to see it).

See Spot Run? Anterior Fontanelle, Part 2

seespotThe soft spot feels like an epicenter in O’s landscape. As every new parent gets to know their baby, the soft spot is just one of those places and spaces we come to know that makes our baby unique. I know O’s little spot is about to go away. Just another thing for me to cry about at the two-year birthday party.

I took a phone call from the husband recently who is a pediatric radiologist and who was reading a head CT scan, inquiring when I thought the soft spot closed in infants, exactly. He knows a lot more anatomy, physiology and imaging of the skull than I do, but he had a common question: just when does it close? Like so many things in medicine, I don’t think it’s entirely clear. There is no perfect answer.  The short answer is around 1-2 year of life. But like so many things, the range of normal is expansive. Read full post »

Science Of The Soft Spot: The Anterior Fontanelle, Part 1

The soft spot on the top of my baby’s head is one of my favorite places to run my hand.  I don’t know why exactly but it seems one of those places on him that truly represents his baby-hood.  One way I know that his infancy isn’t quite gone and my baby days aren’t over yet. O recently turned a year (so, yes, technically he’s no infant) and I have felt his baby-ness slipping through my fingers. I keep saying that to my patients when they ask about him. I am hoping it will somehow prolong this period and I won’t have to wake up and find myself with two grown boys in the house.

The emotional yo-yo between pure excitement about them growing up, with the simultaneous dread of losing these baby moments, remains real and palpable. The essence of parenthood I suppose is that stew of anxiety-thrill-dread-adoration-excitement as the days unfold and you hope for new things for your little baby while lamenting the loss of precious moments of who your baby is on a Monday in January.  So the soft spot is a good place to go to calm my inner anxiety about my toddlers walking out the door to college.

Lots of new parents ask me about caring for the soft spot. As the first year unfolds, it is the soft spot (aka “fontanelle”) in the front/top portion of a baby’s head that parents ask about, the anterior fontanelle. I think we all conjure up crazy worries about an errant flying pencil landing in it. Read full post »