‘play’

All Articles tagged ‘play’

The Value of Play

bike ride 2013

As we transition to summertime we get to focus even more intently on play. Not as easy as it sounds.

There’s a balance with having a routine and structure for your child while also facilitating some time for creative play. Unstructured play doesn’t get the voice it deserves in my opinion. Parents ask me about the camps I’ve signed up for far more than they ask what downtime my children will get this summer. In my mind, the perfect summer is a blend of scattered exciting opportunities with swaths of time ready for unstructured play.

Boredom can be good for heavily scheduled children and can foster creativity

There’s lots of stress amidst the celebrations and change that comes with the end of the school year. Children thrive in routine, so even a good transition out of school can cause disruption. Some children will have insomnia, decreased eating, or even feelings of anxiety. Big changes can trigger feelings of depression in some children, too. Check in with your child if you’re worried and remember that more important than what you say will likely be that you listen.

Play

Maria Montessori famously identified the value of play saying, “Play is the work of the child.” Play is so important it is a protected child human right by the United Nations. Just as labor laws protect our children from hard labor and work, we parents must protect their chance to wander, dream, roam, and discover. Research shows play is important for brain development, an important platform to learn decision-making, and offers up a tool for children to identify their passions. I don’t mean time in front of the TV or DS. I mean time outside, in the backyard, or in a child’s room. In the 2007 American Academy of Pediatrics statement on play, Dr Ken Ginsburg wrote, “In contrast to passive entertainment, play builds active, healthy bodies.” Read full post »

Play

Recently, I started asking a standard question, exactly the same way, to children during their 3 to 10 year old check-ups. This wasn’t premeditated. Like all physicians, I go through phases of what I ask kids to elicit their experiences and beliefs, listen to their language and observe their development. I learn a lot about my patients from what they choose to answer. Both in their receptive language skills (how they understand me) and their expressive skills (how they speak–fluidly, articulately, with sentences) to their cognition (how they understand concepts and theories). No one talks as much when in the exam room as they do at home. Pediatricians know this (of course!), but these questions are a great way to learn a lot about a child’s wellness and get to know my patients. It’s also the part of the day I enjoy the most.

But when I started asking a recent question something became utterly clear. I’d say,

“What do you like to do at home?”

I expected the usual suspects. Things like, “Watch TV,” “Play the DS,”, or “Play with princesses or doll houses.” Not that I expected stereotypes, I just expected specifics. But instead, there has been a uniform, single-word response. Breath-taking. These children are all saying the exact same thing.

“Play.”

One word. Read full post »

Little Boy = Violent Play?

So parenting news is aflutter with research talking about little boys, their genetic make-up, and their aggressive and violent make believe play. New writing posits that this violent and aggressive play may be needed, that boys will process their aggression via this play. But the jury is still out for some educators and parents. The debate is timely for me after a recent weekend with my two little boys and their 4 year old cousin. I must say, I have the experience in observation part down pat. I’ve seen this behavior, yes.

Boys Need Aggressive Make Believe Play

From how I see it, boys may gravitate to aggressive play but as parents, we never have to condone their violent or aggressive actions. I really believe the lines between imagination, play, and the “real world” are often blurred. There are countless examples of children not understanding the consequences of their actions precisely because they are children. If I let my son pretend to kill/shoot/fight, aren’t I somehow complicit in equating a violent response as an okay one?

What do you think? Do you think aggressive, violent play is an essential part of boyhood?