‘pregnancy’

All Articles tagged ‘pregnancy’

Peanut Brittle For Preggers

Photo from Edwart Visser Flickr Creative Commons

Photo from Edwart Visser, Flickr Creative Commons

“Children appear to be less at risk for developing peanut or tree nut allergies if their mothers are not allergic and ate more nuts during pregnancy,” according to a study published today in JAMA Pediatrics. And although this doesn’t mean that you need to run out for the peanut brittle the minute you’re pregnant, it may mean we can reassure pregnant women that if they have no allergies themselves, what they eat during pregnancy should contain nuts, among other things.

As you’ve likely heard, children with peanut allergies have more than tripled in the United States this last 15 years. Food allergies affect 1 in 13 children in the United States and up to 40% of children have had a life-threatening or severe reaction. Any family with a food-allergic child will tell you this is a BIG deal.

The rapid rise of food allergies is incompletely understood, but more and more research suggests that waiting to introduce “high allergy” foods (traditionally thought of as peanut, egg, or shellfish for example) may have actually caused more allergies than prevented them. As this was being discovered this last decade or so, flip-flopping recommendations on what to eat ourselves when pregnant and what to feed our babies have left many of us confused.

When Should I Start Baby Food?

New recommendations really encourage introduction of a variety of foods, including nuts, eggs, shellfish, wheat, and soy within the first year of life. The theory is that early introduction of the components of these foods allow a child’s developing body to create a tolerance to them, thus potentially avoiding any allergy or reaction to them later on. Read full post »

Emergency Contraception For Teens

Stating that unintended pregnancy is a major public health problem, The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommended that birth control pills be available over the counter this month. And this past week the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) outlined emergency contraception use in teens girls while urging pediatricians to provide information and access to emergency contraception for sexually active teens.

All this may seem exceedingly ”progressive” until you examine some of the realities. As many as 80% of pregnancies in teen girls in the United States are unintended. The birth rate for 15 to 19 year-olds is 34 out of 1000. Most pregnancies are a result of non-use of contraception or mishaps with protection (condoms breaking, pills being missed and/or forgotten or used inconsistently). We know teens don’t take their birth control as well as adults and lapses in pills or misuse can put them at risk. This is where emergency contraception can come in. I was taught how to prescribe emergency contraception to teens as a back up for contraception failure when I was in residency. I’ve been educating teens, discussing their options, and prescribing emergency contraception ever since.

What is “Emergency Contraception?”

Emergency contraception (EC) is the use of hormone pills after sexual assault, unprotected intercourse, or contraceptive failures. Read full post »

Cocoon A Newborn, Only An Email Away

This week, Washington State declared that whooping cough (pertussis) has reached epidemic levels. Since the beginning of the year, we’ve had more than 600 documented cases in the state, a dramatic increase since last year. The increase puts our new babies at risk.

In clinic I’ve been urging new parents to cocoon their babies. That is, provide a family of protection by having every single child & adult immunized against whooping cough, influenza, and other vaccine preventable illnesses. By surrounding a baby with only immunized people, you cocoon them against serious infections.

Whooping cough is a highly infectious respiratory illness spread by sneezing and coughing that can be deadly to young infants. Getting a Tdap shot is the best way to avoid getting whooping cough. Amidst an epidemic, we worry most about newborns because they are most vulnerable to complications and lack vaccine-protection. If every child and adult that surrounds a newborn gets a Tdap shot, the likelihood of the baby getting whooping cough approaches zero.

Most newborns get whooping cough from their family or adults around them. That’s where an email comes to play.

You’re going to have to be fairly Mama-Papa-Bear about this. You’ll have to show some strength to create a very safe home, even when it feels somewhat over-the-top. As I said to a number of families in clinic today, “It only seems entirely over-the-top-nuts until we lose another newborn to pertussis.” Being smart now will save lives.

Make a new rule: no visits with a newborn until all visitors have had the Tdap shot. Even Grandparents.

Write an email to family and friends to explain.

A sample email for you to use/copy/share –written today by a friend of mine–mother to that darling baby girl born last week: Read full post »

Plan B Back Behind The Counter

I was disappointed to hear the news that Kathleen Sebelius blocked the FDA’s recommendation to make Plan B available to all girls, over-the-counter (OTC). Plan B is an oral tablet containing hormones (similar to what is in a birth control pill) that when taken within 1 to 3 days of unprotected sex, can prevent an unwanted pregnancy. It is used as a back-up birth control. Primarily, Plan B works to delay ovulation thus making it less likely that a girl could be pregnant. Effectiveness increases the earlier a girl takes the pill after unprotected sex, so we want sexually-active teens to have it on-hand, just in case.

When it comes to Plan B, timing is everything.

Girls 17 and up can get Plan B for about $50 without a prescription. They can walk into any drug store, head back to the pharmacy counter, show an ID and purchase the pill to prevent a pregnancy. Those 16 years-old and under cannot; they must see a health provider to get Plan B. Trouble is, not every girl can see the physician when they want. Many girls at risk for an unwanted pregnancy may not have access to a clinician immediately or within a day or so. Further, girls may be too embarrassed or concerned about judgment to talk with their parent. And that’s where I start to worry; an unintended pregnancy can have significant physical and emotional health consequences.

Let me be very clear: I’m all for girls seeing their pediatrician for health advice. Read full post »

Loving Number 2 Just Like Number 1: Prioritizing Your Pregnancy

Home pregnancy test

Before O (my second baby boy) was born I couldn’t really fathom loving him like I did, F (my first born).  I’m not alone in this, I know.  One of my friends recently told me she was so bewildered by the idea of number two that when she, her husband, her first son and her brand new baby were on the way home from the hospital, she leaned over from the passenger seat and whispered, “I’ll always love you best,” to her first born.  Whew.

It happened though.  Just like everybody told me.   I really love number 2. Read full post »