‘safety’

All Articles tagged ‘safety’

Living In A Museum: Safe Medication Storage

OTC Safety Info Where Do Kids Find MedsJune is a lot of things to me this year: the month I turned 40 (yipeee!), the earnest start of summer, the beginnings of an awesome USA performance in the 2014 World Cup and also National Home Safety Month. Of course it may be easy to make time to celebrate turning 40 or to watch the taped game where USA beats Ghana (go team!) but there really is one thing we should move into position numero uno. Can you make your house more museum-like, at least when it comes to medication safety this summer? Here’s why it should be placed at the top of the list.

A quick digression: no question I’d really like to live in a museum — unlike lots of others, it seems — I’m one of those people who hates a messy house although our house really does get highly disorganized (I find errant legos in every room/every day, our beds aren’t always made and may I ask where in the world do all the dirty socks come from?). I would prefer a museum-like home, beautiful stone on the floor, gorgeous lighting, thoughtful works of art on the wall and no distracting debris. A clean surface on which to place my purse when I walk in the door would be a good compromise! When I looked at the Up & Away tools that helps provide tips for parents on medication safety at home it reminded me that yes- museum living is definitely what I want (I mean, heck, look at that kitchen!!). HOWEVER, the realities of having 2 kids and limited time to keep organizational systems in check I’m going to have to settle for my not-always-perfectly cleaned floors, the walls of childhood art, the stacks and piles of mail and school forms, and the lighting I’ve got. But one thing I won’t sacrifice are the safety systems we’ve made to keep medications and toxins out of reach, even as our boys get older. Some data here reminded me I need to revisit our systems. Read full post »

Constipation, No Fun For Anyone

Constipation is really no fun for anyone. No fun for baby or child, no fun for the parent who cleans the clogged toilet, no fun for the sister or brother who waits while someone works on solving the problem in the room next door. In general, constipation is a frustrating, sometimes embarrassing, and often chronic problem for young children. Here are a few ideas to get rid of the no-fun part and ways to protect your children, support them positively, and avoid dangers that can rarely come from over-the-counter (OTC) medications.

Before you reach for OTC medications, consider what is normal and what is not normal when it comes to poop. I usually break this down for children (and parents) in visual terms. I talk about things you find outside.

In general, poop in the toilet can look like a pond, a snakea log, or a pebble. When it comes to poop, we’re always looking for snakes. It seems to me that framed this way, school age children can do a better job knowing if they’re constipated or not. We’re looking for  Snakes in the Lake, people! Frame it this way with your child and perhaps they will be more likely to get a glimpse of what they produce in the toilet?

In my experience, parents worry a lot about hard infant or toddler poop in the diaper but constipation sneaks up on many families to school-aged children. After children are toilet trained and wiping themselves (around age 4 or 5) many parents no longer gaze in the toilet bowl. Long gone are the days of staring at every diaper as parents lose track of the daily poops, how often they poop, and how a child feels when pooping. But first, some definitions: Read full post »

You Need A Carbon Monoxide Alarm

There’s a new law today in Washington State requiring carbon monoxide (CO) alarms in apartments, condos, and single-family residences. You should have a CO detector on every level of your home (more tips below). I know you’ve heard that CO poisoning is not only dangerous but also potentially fatal. We also often hear horrific stories of accidental deaths from carbon monoxide after natural disasters. A recent study found disaster related deaths are particularly common (your power’s wiped out so you bring in a generator or grill for heating or cooking and get exposed to CO). Using a generator indoors is the most common cause of CO poisoning, followed by use of a grill. Unfortunately, over 400 people die in the US each year from CO poisoning—all of which could be avoided with proper education and detection in the home. The odd thing is that we often get to see CO toxicity play out on our favorite television shows (think Mad Men)~ the ever-again scene where someone clogs up the exhaust pipe of a car with a banana or handkerchief and dies (or attempts to) due to the toxic fumes.

One generator running inside a home, garage, or basement creates the equivalent carbon monoxide of 6 idling cars. Precisely why a generator needs to be 20 feet from inside spaces and away from open windows/doors. Carbon monoxide is found in combustion fumes–it can be produced by cars and trucks, small gasoline engines, stoves, lanterns, burning charcoal and wood, gas ranges, and heating systems. You likely know all this. But…

The thing to know: carbon monoxide in and of itself is more dangerous to babies and young children. Infants in utero, newborns, and young children process carbon monoxide differently, have more severe reactions, and may see effects faster than adults. If you and your young child were in a room that was filling with carbon monoxide, it’s your baby or child that would suffer the consequences first. They may not know how to tell you about their complaints and if they were sleeping you may not even know. Hence all of us needing a CO detector.

carbon monoxide teaching fr CDC

The Science of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning:

The red blood cells in our blood circulate oxygen to all of our muscles and organs for survival. When carbon monoxide (CO) is in the air it can function as a disguised villain. When carbon monoxide is inhaled into the lungs via contaminated air, the red blood cell picks up the CO instead of just oxygen. Each carbon monoxide molecule that attaches to a red blood cell displaces a spot for oxygen. Therefore the circulating red blood cells go around the body without oxygen causing improper circulation. Organ failure and death can result after higher and higher level of our cells are bound to CO instead of oxygen.

The graphic is from the Centers For Disease Control (CDC)’s comprehensive review on CO poisoning.

Read full post »

More Than A Dozen Children Died At School Today

The news of the shooting in Newtown, Conneticut this morning is beyond horrific. Nauseating and troubling, it’s left me sobbing at my computer to think of the anguish families face. And the lesser anguish we all feel right now. To think of the lost hope and the lost efforts of all those that work so hard to protect children and those who work to educate them. And the loss of safety in another school.

The news from Newtown is agonizing. The loss is unthinkable.

And I’ll tell you this: there are days I wake up and wonder, “Am I doing this right?” or “How can I balance my life and work to improve the lives of children ?” or “Can I really speak my mind?” And then there are moments like this, where it’s clear.

Here’s my mind:

  • I believe we have an obligation to fight to protect children from guns in the hands of the crazy, the wild, the intolerant, and the careless.
  • I believe it’s really difficult to figure out who is crazy, wild, intolerant, and careless.
  • I believe gun control should have been yesterday’s topic, not today’s. Lives could have been saved. I believe politicians must put politics aside and create a safer United States now.
  • I believe the President of the United States has a moment to make change.
  • I believe that guns have no place in our homes.
  • I believe we must keep demanding improved understanding and education for we parents about how to get automatic weapons out of civilian hands.
  • I believe I am hardly alone on this. Even so, when I write about gun control I get angry responses.
  • I believe this: WE ALL WANT THE SAME THING—safe communities, healthy children, and opportunity for long lives.

Tell me what I can do to make a bigger difference. And please tell me what you’re going to do.

Tips from Pediatrician Dr Besser on talking with children about tragedy (this was filmed after Aurora shooting) and tips from Dr Robert Hilt at Seattle Children’s. Easiest first step is likely to just turn off the news…

Safe Holidays For Your Children

This is a wonderful time of year. It’s also a really stressful one for many of us. Some quick reminders about ways to stay safe while bringing holiday decor into your home, traveling, while arguing with your brother about gifts, and when potentially having more alcohol around than is typical…

  • FIRE: Be careful of lit candles and check the safety of lights you place on trees or around the outside of your home. Christmas trees are like kindling for house fires. Check out National Fire Protection Agency’s info or watch this video of a tree catching fire.
  • DECOR: Holiday decorations often bring hazards for young children. This include candle holders, Christmas tree ornaments, plants, decorative garlands, and hot liquids. I’ve cared for many children with scald burns from soups and hot liquids. With decorations, anything longer than 12 inches can pose a strangulation risk. Make sure your trees and larger decorations are mounted in a way that your child (of any age) can’t pull them down upon themselves.
  • ALCOHOL: With holiday and New Year’s parties fast approaching, it’s good to have a plan for alcohol–if you’re serving it or drinking it. Many sober alcoholics relapse this time of year and many small drinkers consume alcohol more excessively. We have to be careful with our guests and ourselves — for our children. Clean up after parties, too–don’t want toddlers finding the punch!

This kind of advice feels heavy-handed and self-evident. It’s not as if we wouldn’t have thought of most of this. Read full post »

5 Things From Thing 1 And Thing 2

Truly, I’m distracted this Halloween. I think more than anything else, we should take the time (and money) today to donate to the Red Cross. Then put the costumes together. The destruction and suffering from hurricane-storm Sandy are at the forefront of our thoughts as families. For some communities, Halloween is postponed or delayed. It’s just a holiday, of course, but a big one for our children. It’s one holiday where children take center stage and create lasting memories. So I don’t want to de-value this, either — celebration is a really important part of our lives.

For those of us able to celebrate Halloween today, here’s some quick reminders. Fortunately, Halloween injuries are not all that common. A 2010 report found that there were more trips to the ER from sports injuries on Halloween than holiday ones. That being said, here are some tips I’ve read that are worth repeating.

  1. Sidewalks: On Halloween I worry most about injuries for children while walking around (getting hit by a car, tripping on a costume, or falling down), not razor blades in apples. Children are injured more as pedestrians on Halloween than from anything else the holiday inspires. When you set out with (or without) your children tonight, think about maximizing their safety on the sidewalk and on the street. Remind your kids never to believe that they are the right of way on the street. Yielding has great power and protection. Stay on sidewalks whenever you can.
  2. Be Seen: This is fairly self-evident but…..bring your cell phone, a light stick and/or a flashlight when trick-or-treating. Be seen and reachable when necessary. And remind teens about getting around while they are texting. Recent data finds teens are having more and more pedestrian injuries (up 25%), partly due to texting and walking. When distracted, they’re far more likely to get struck by a car. Read full post »

Helmets Or Health Or Happiness?

A recent piece in the New York Times highlighted the reality that some cities are ditching required bike helmets to encourage bike riding, even here in the US.  Too much of an inconvenience, I guess. Too much of a hassle and impediment. Public planners all over the world don’t want helmets to get in the way of, ummm, health.

And it got me thinking, in places like Europe where cycling is far more mainstream, and where helmet-wearing isn’t, are they just that much more laid back? Are they healthier and/or possibly happier, too?

Does zooming out and thinking of the crowd (better active population, lower BMI, less diabetes, less rules) while avoiding the thought of the catastrophic realities of few individuals (those who suffer harm from traumatic brain injury) make us healthier and happier as a community?

The question of course can only be answered if we agree on a definition of health and if we agree on one for happiness, too. And if we’re not the one whose child is injured.

But just this week three things happened that made me wonder if there are competing goals when I spend time chatting about bike & sports helmets and on using carseats properly, too. The issues are somewhat similar. A study last year found that the majority of parents don’t take pediatricians’ advice with car seats and another found parents are far more lax with booster seats when they carpool, too. And it was these 3 things that got me thinking on this again: Read full post »

Swim Lessons Before School

New data around the world has found that early swim lessons (between age 1 and 4) may confer added protection against drowning. Maybe a new rule should be swim lessons before the start of school?

Many parents tell me in clinic that they are terrified about their children drowning. If you’re one of those, arm yourself with information: read some of the links (below) and consider signing up for lessons. However, don’t use swim lessons as an excuse to decrease vigilance around the pool or lake or riverside. Young children between age 1 and 4 years of age drown the most. Drowning happens quickly, and sometimes it’s very quiet or even silent.

Information, Myths, Truths, And Opinion About Swimming Lessons And Water Safety

  • Never let an infant or toddler out of arm’s reach when swimming or playing in water. There is good data stemming from an article published in March of 2009 to suggest swimming lessons may prove to be protective against drowning. Drowning is the second most common cause of death from injury in kids less 14 or younger.
  • 6 myths about water safety  Read full post »

Laundry Detergent PODS

I bought some laundry detergent PODS this past month–little pre-measured capsules of laundry detergent you can just throw in the wash. They were on sale and seemingly convenient, an easy alternative to measuring out drippy detergent. It didn’t even cross my mind they could be risky. That kind of (typical) oversight is what leads to potential injuries in our homes.

Trouble with these delightfully-colored PODS is that they look like toys and they will dissolve rapidly in liquid or saliva. That combination of good looks and good dissolution sets toddlers up for a potential rapid ingestion. The Washington State Poison Center has sent out an alert to emergency departments around the state detailing potential dangers from PODS ingestions. Toddlers in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Toronto, Canada have developed peculiar difficulties after ingesting PODS that are unusual for detergent ingestions. Some toddlers have required emergent, intensive care — short term intubation (breathing tubes), change in alertness, vomiting, and seizure-like activity after ingestions. Ophthalmologists have reported eye injuries. Because the PODS contain super-concentrated liquid detergent packaged beautifully, toddlers may mistake them for a toy and do what toddlers do best: put it in their mouth. The PODS capsule is engineered to dissolve rapidly in water so will do the same in a child’s mouth. From what we know now, exposures to PODS need to be treated with higher caution than those of typical laundry detergent.

Spread the word about proper storage for these PODS. Keep them up and out of reach. If you’re ever concerned about any ingestion, call Poison Control at 1-800-222-1222. If you ever forget the phone number, just Google it—the number will always be the first hit when you type in “poison control.”

How To Dose Acetaminophen or Ibuprofen

Earlier this year, the FDA recommended the discontinuation of infant acetaminophen drops. The goal was to minimize confusion by only making acetaminophen (aka Tylenol) in one universal liquid strength for both babies and older children. However, because the FDA provided a recommendation and not a mandate, there are currently two different liquid acetaminophen preparations on the shelves marketed for babies. And another liquid marketed for older children. Ultimately, it may be more confusing than ever. Thank goodness I just got a little help from my friends…

The pharmacists at The Everett Clinic (where I practice) created a beautiful handout designed to clarify dosing for infant and children’s over-the-counter (OTC) fever reducers/pain relievers. See the dosing chart below along with the renderings of typical dosing devices (syringe, dropper, or cap). Print it out and put it in your medicine cabinet. Review it with Grandma or the sitter or your partner. And remember, the most important way to avoid a dosing error is to keep the original dosing device with the actual OTC medication. Resist the urge to grab a kitchen spoon!

Check out a video I made last year about common OTC medication dosing problems. The numbers will surprise you (hint: nearly all pediatric OTC meds in the US had inconsistencies, superfluous, or confusing dosing instructions). Dosing medications for our children can be more complicated than we’d like. So let me know what else you want to know about dosing acetaminophen or ibuprofen.