‘safety’

All Articles tagged ‘safety’

Little Boy = Violent Play?

So parenting news is aflutter with research talking about little boys, their genetic make-up, and their aggressive and violent make believe play. New writing posits that this violent and aggressive play may be needed, that boys will process their aggression via this play. But the jury is still out for some educators and parents. The debate is timely for me after a recent weekend with my two little boys and their 4 year old cousin. I must say, I have the experience in observation part down pat. I’ve seen this behavior, yes.

Boys Need Aggressive Make Believe Play

From how I see it, boys may gravitate to aggressive play but as parents, we never have to condone their violent or aggressive actions. I really believe the lines between imagination, play, and the “real world” are often blurred. There are countless examples of children not understanding the consequences of their actions precisely because they are children. If I let my son pretend to kill/shoot/fight, aren’t I somehow complicit in equating a violent response as an okay one?

What do you think? Do you think aggressive, violent play is an essential part of boyhood?

Moving Day: Double Take

Baby eating a popsicleDoes this photo look familiar? We moved again today. Yup, we moved homes just 10 months ago. Crazy or stupid, you decide.

I’m just home from a late night in clinic. The boys are in their new spaces while the boxes tower amidst the palpable tired. But the night still swells with possibility. I can see the stars from the back yard. And the bare walls blended with the smell of cardboard boxes, makes me feel like I just turned the page in a new hard-covered book. Moving, albeit chaotic and uniquely stressful, can feel like hope. Optimism prevails tonight.

But I’m still thinking of the last time around.

Here’s my moving day post from last year. Read about our terrible misfortune and improper planning. Learn from our mistakes. Especially if you’re about to do a moving-double-take, too.
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My story of 9 stitches, 2 parents who feel as deflated, flat and small as the bottom of your worn shoe, a near 3-year-old boy, and 1 orange Popsicle. This is about our mistakes and the dangers of the events that followed moving day in my world, October 31, 2009.

But let’s go back in time; history is supposed to be one of our most sage instructors.

Circa 2003. I took care of a 3-year-old girl in the ER when I was an intern (my first year as a physician, while training in pediatrics) after medical school. In medical training, there are certain patients that stick out, jump off the exam-room-pages, of the hundreds of patients you can see in a month’s time. I know some will stay with me forever. Read full post »

If It Were My Child: No Feeding The Dog

“If it were my child: No kids feeding the dog.” Don’t allow kids to play, handle, or touch the dog bowls, dog treats, or supplements, either. You have to be vigilant and organized. I’m not always both, or either, for that matter. I have found my boys basically bathing in dog water, and dipping their hands/face/sippy cup into our dog food bin many times. News today informed me to change the rules around here.

Pet owners, be aware. Not, “beware.” I’m not trying to scare. A study published yesterday in Pediatrics found that a large number of salmonella infections between 2006-2008 were linked to contaminated dry dog/cat food.  Salmonella infections cause abdominal cramping, bloody stools, and in some (often the very young), more severe infections. I read about dog food as a possible cause of infection back in 2007 when my son (4 months at the time) came down with Salmonella gastroenteritis. Yes, it’s a real story. Bloody diarrhea, cramping pain, lots and lots of crying–poor little guy. I felt it was all my fault. He was an infant and I was controlling everything he ate, after all.

But F didn’t get Salmonella from dog food, he got it from a more predictable route. Read full post »

Guns In Your House?

Asking friends about guns is like asking about their underwear. Not in the pediatric office, but at home, on the street, and in the neighborhood. Hear me out…

My next-door-neighbor (NDN) is a stay at home dad (SAHD). On most days, he runs his household and wrangles 8 and 6 year-old boys until his wife joins him after work. The three (or four) of them seem to weave and pedal through life, on and off their bikes. I can see them coming and going throughout the day; it’s my crystal ball of sorts as to what life with 2 boys may look like about 5 years from now…

Last Friday, NDN approached me from his porch. We often talk, porch-to-porch, about life, the trees, our favorite noodle shop, or the weather. Last Friday, it was different. He said, “You should write a post about gun violence.” I said, “Yah, I know, I should write about 2 million posts…”

But then he framed the issue for me. And I knew he was right.
Read full post »

Drowning: Quieter, Faster, & Closer Than You Think

Two teenagers died in New York yesterday. Not from a gun shot, a car crash, or suicides. Rather, they drowned in a popular swimming hole in the Bronx river on a hot summer day. I hate stories like that. Hate hearing it, hate seeing the headline. A total failure for prevention efforts.

I talk about drowning in clinic every day I see patients. I should probably talk about it more often. As I said in my earlier post outlining the new AAP Prevention of Drowning guidelines (& swimming lessons between age 1-4 yrs), drowning is the second leading cause of injury related death in children 1 to 19 years of age. And most drownings in the US happen this time of year. When it’s hot outside, the lake, stream, or pool can look really gooood. Even to those who don’t know how to swim.

I talk about drowning mostly with the parents of toddlers. But I should spend more time talking with adolescents. I get distracted by all the drugs, sex, and rock-and-roll stuff I talk about. Today, I am reminded of the importance of talking with teens about drowning, because of those teens but also this perspective about drowning.

See drowning isn’t what you think it is. It’s not loud and splashy and outrageous. It’s not like it looks in the movies… Read full post »

Silent Deliciousness

When I first watched this video, the computer volume was off (I didn’t know it) and I thought this was a silent video. I loved the stillness of the quiet mixed with the emotion of the ad.

I cried (yes, I’m the kind of person who always does) one of those quiet cries, the kind where you’d never know I was crying unless you were looking straight into my eyes. Tears just dripped silently.

Instead of being impregnated with fear, this public service announcement is loaded with hope.

Such a simple, kind way to illustrate why we take the time to buckle-up.

Isn’t it amazing how much people love you?

PS–Because it was such a stunningly nice way to watch this, I recommend you watch this first without sound, then watch it again with the music turned way up. Also, if you share this with teens, will you share with me what they thought of it? I’m on the fence thinking this will resonate with those 12-18 year olds. As I am in the process of creating a list of videos for children to watch on YouTube (to hand out at check-ups), I wonder if I should include this. Digame.

The Most Devastating Article: Fatal Distraction By Gene Weingarten

Happy July. In Seattle that usually means that summer is soon to arrive. For the rest of the US, I know, it has already begun. Ever since last week though, I have thought about July differently. I was midway through this post last Friday when I was forced to abandon it. Overwhelmed by the article I read, I wrote about sighing. I’ve now taken a big sigh… But this information has not left me. Today, we enter July, the month out of the year in which more US children die after being left (and trapped) in hot cars, than any other. Windows up and forgotten, these children die of hyperthermia and overheating. They overheat, cry for help, and are left unheard. It’s unthinkable, really. 18 children have already died this year, 8 of them in the first two weeks of June. Unfortunately, now that two weeks has passed, this statistic has likely changed.

This utterly alarming trend has caught the attention of safety experts. And mine. We all need to create systems in our life to prevent this from happening. Make a system to check the back seat of your car every single time you walk away from it. Kids in it or not.

You can read right over this stuff feeling like it’s irrelevant.

You’re thinking, this will never happen to me. No way would I forget my kid in the car. Before you convince yourself, read this 2010 Pultizer Prize winning article by Gene Weingarten published in March, 2009. It has changed my life; It is the most devastating article I’ve read all year. I’m not overstating this. The handful of others that I have had read this say the very same. Share it with anyone who will ever drive a child in a car seat or booster seat, anywhere. Read full post »

Dropper, Syringe or Cap? Dosing Liquid Medications

Here’s a quick video about dosing liquid medications for infants and children. Some tips on how to avoid giving the incorrect dose. Measuring liquid medications & vitamins for children demands having the proper tools–which we don’t always have. It seems, 12 minutes after I come home with medications, I lose that pesky cap…
So take a look at the video and see if it helps. For me it was a great reminder to organize the medicine cabinet again. And possibly the kitchen counters…

Pop Quiz: The Teaspoon, cc, & mL

Yesterday, the FDA put out a warning for parents regarding the risk of over-dose in infants receiving Vitamin D supplements. Seemingly scary, especially since nearly every infant is recommended vitamin D supplementation. But hold on a minute. As you likely know, I recommend giving 400IU (1 cc) of Vitamin D to all breast-fed and/or partially breast-fed infants every day. My blog posts about why and the research.

The FDA warning really gets to the heart of a bigger issue: how we understand dosing liquid medications as parents. So, let’s keep this warning in perspective. When you give Vitamin D to an infant (or your babysitter, nanny, or mother does), make sure you have a dropper with “1 cc” etched on the side. The warning is really rooted in how we use the tools we’re given to dose medications. This is a problem that crosses all education and socioeconomic lines. Particularly in the case of medications that can cause life threatening complications in an overdose situation. For example, when O was given pain medication for his broken leg last week in California, the Rx said: “Give 1/2 tsp every 6 hours.” But the pharmacist gave us a 5 cc syringe. Would you know what to do? The husband had to double check…

I was a middle school science teacher; in the spirit of safety (playing along?) please do the pop quiz below. Post your responses to the questions. Be bold. And as I told my 9th-grade science students in Oakland some 10+ years ago, if you think the test is easy, “Well, good for you.”

Answers will arrive later today with rationale & explanations of why I am forcing you to do this. Now, get out your #2…

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Pop Quiz: Conversions & Other Necessary Info For Giving Meds To Children

#1 How many cc are in a mL?

#2 How many mL in a teaspoon?

#3 Without looking it up, tell me how you’d give your child 1 1/2 teaspoons of medicine using a 5 cc syringe the pharmacist gave you?

#4 If the doctor told you to give your child 1 tsp of medicine, twice a day, for 10 days, and the pharmacist gave you 100 cc of medicine, will you have enough?

#5 Your pediatrician tells you to give your child 1/2 tsp of Children’s Motrin for pain. You loose the cap on the top of the bottle. You pull out a teaspoon from the silverware drawer. Filling up half way will likely work. Yes or No?

#6 Your pediatrician tells you to give your child 1/2 tsp of Children’s Motrin for pain. You loose the cap on the top of the bottle. You pull out a set of measuring spoons from the drawer. You pick the “1/2 teaspoon” spoon. Will this work?  Yes or No?

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The “Inherent Risk And Implied Immorality” of Distracted Driving

Distracted driving = drunk driving. All doctors in and out of primary care should be telling patients this. Oprah talks about it nearly every day. We should, too. We have the rare privilege of an often captive audience. Our patients come to us for advice.

Framing distracted driving with drunk driving conveys the “Inherent Risk and implied immorality” of the situation, wrote Dr Amy Ship in today’s New England Journal of Medicine.

She says, “more than 275 millionAmericans own cell phones, and 81% of them talk on those phoneswhile driving.” It’s time for primary care doctors to not only talk about the issue, but frame and explain the risk that distracted driving poses for patients.  In my world that is teenagers who are driving.  And then all the children who ride around in cars with drivers who are distracted.

In the editorial, Dr Ship uses a Youtube video for storytelling and education. It’s a brilliant use of new media. A little morsel for all of us to endure.

If you have a teenager, will you please show them this video? Graphic, real, and powerful, it tells the story of consequence. And what it looks like to suffer from risks taken while driving distracted. If we can put down the phone, maybe we can all learn how to drive again. Don’t some people say they wish they were 16 again? This may be our chance.