‘social media’

All Articles tagged ‘social media’

Status Update: Facebook Changes For Teens

Facebook imageFacebook changed its privacy policy for teens this week, despite work from advocacy groups and media experts against the change. On Wednesday October 16th teen privacy settings were adjusted to allow teens to share status updates and photos publicly. The change literally allows the public a window into a teen’s thoughts and photos on Facebook for the first time.

Fortunately, teens can control this by opting out of public sharing. The default setting at this point for teens when joining Facebook will not automatically allow for public sharing. Teens can opt-in after clicking through a pop-up notice. This step could of course change.

Visit the privacy setting page on Facebook with your teen.

In my opinion this is not in the best interest of our children. As we evolve and adapt to using social tools, we’re all still getting our footing. So are our teens as they begin to create a digital footprint of thoughts and photos online. Further, concerns about this shift include public access to teen sharing that will likely be data-mined and scoured by advertisers and companies hoping to target teens with goods and services.

Read this blog post from pediatrician and social media expert, Dr Megan Moreno, on the new changes for teens. Information and links on how to talk to teens about changes along with resources for learning more are included. A recent Q&A she completed online about parents and teens is linked. She says it best when she says:

This situation presents an enormous opportunity for parents to have conversations with their teens about privacy settings online.  For parents who have already had these conversations in the past, it’s time to sit down and discuss Facebook’s decision, review your family’s rules about online safety, and review your teen’s current privacy settings on Facebook – both their overall  “privacy settings” and the “audience” for their posts.

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A Cab Ride In Canada

It was sunny when I landed in Toronto on Tuesday evening so I felt a bit lifted as I sat down into one of the most pleasant cab rides I can remember. The driver was 69 he said, and his claim to good health was avoiding alcohol, shunning cigarettes, and waking up each and every morning to exercise. “Just 30 minutes a day,” he said, “Changed everything in my life.” I held my tongue as he kept talking. The coincidence with the first meeting I’d have while in Toronto was startling. As Dr. Mike Evans and I talked over coffee the following morning, the serendipity of the unified voice in Canada was an unexpected delight. A patient and doctor sharing the same similar thought—one from experience, one from expertise: 30 minutes a day could change your life. If you haven’t seen the video, please watch 23 ½ hours now.

The cab driver was one of 10 children to his mother and father born in the Philippines (5 boys, 5 girls – how’s that for biology playing out) who has lived in Canada for 11 years. All of his siblings were living now in Canada or the US and he’d asked why I’d arrived in Toronto. I’d arrived to, “Share some ideas on using social tools to transform health care,” I said. Maybe it was our deeply political and nearly anthropologic conversation that charmed me. Maybe it was the story I re-read just prior to taking off in Seattle detailing the generous cab drive a man offered a dying woman. Yet Tuesday night in the cab I realized instantly, like I usually do, that although I was there to share my thoughts with a number of people, I would learn potentially much more from Canadians than I would impart. It really is so good to get out of Dodge and see how other people do things. Read full post »

Emily’s Entourage

EmilyThis is a guest blog from Emily Kramer-Golinkoff. I was lucky enough to meet her about a year ago & even luckier that she asked me to help her make a big impact with her final thesis for her Masters in Bioethics. Her story, insight, and strength are worth your time. She’s hoping to leave a big mark in understanding how to leverage the asset of empowered patients to advance science and healing. She’s working to integrate patient communities more intimately in the health system. Her post is about why she chose to be an empowered patient and it’s fairly clear why she’s attracted an entourage…

Truth be told, belonging to a disease community isn’t my clique of choice. An artist community, a running club, even a yogi enclave sound more appealing. But I’ve learned that when our hands are tied, we’re better off building muscles in our legs than spending all our energy trying to wrangle our hands free.

That’s the philosophy I’ve embraced as a 28-year-old with big eyes, a bright future, and an advanced, incurable and fatal disease called Cystic Fibrosis. Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a progressive genetic disease that primarily affects the lungs and digestive system. It causes thick mucus to build up in the lungs, leading to life-threatening infections.

My winding path to patient empowerment started as a headstrong, sassy little girl who clashed with my pediatric CF clinic’s authoritative culture. My perpetual questions of “why?” and efforts to integrate my disease into my life were met with disdain and labeled “difficult.”

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Have You Been In To See Dr. Google?

Screen Shot 2013-01-15 at 9.45.29 AMFor practicing physicians, there’s a tricky balance in believing that the internet can help save lives.

I’m a doctor who encourages families to look up health info online and one who believes technology will afford improved partnerships. Yet, when we’re in the old-fashioned exam room, there isn’t always a place for the internet. Many clinics block video-streaming sites and don’t allow for traditional email exchanges between clinicians and patients. It’s hard to “send” patients information discussed during the visit. In the 10 or 20 minutes we have together, time is precious. Truth be told, health care remains wary of doctors and patients communicating when they’re not in exam room. Most insurers won’t reimburse or pay for electronic communication between patients and their clinicians. So doctors are often forced to bring you into the office to provide expertise. New data today may help change this paradigm. Reality is, many of us are using the internet as a tool for health care.

For at least 1/3 of American adults, the internet is a diagnostic tool

Yet, it’s not just insurers who may be wary of online info. Recently I read a patient review (online) from a parent who was frustrated I’d encouraged them to read the content on this blog. The comment implied that perhaps I was “pushing it.” And that’s the tricky part–when I first started writing this blog I was bashful to mention it in clinic. I wanted patients to feel comfortable NOT pressured. But now that I have over 350 blog posts showcasing research and pediatric health information it’s tantamount that I share it.  I mean, if I’m in the midst of a 15-minute visit and we touch on topics like getting a carbon monoxide monitor, the choking game, the Tdap shot, and the effects of TV on their kid’s developing brain, how could I not augment a parent or teens’ understanding by offering more information online?

Numerous studies find that what parents learn in the exam room with doctors isn’t retained. That’s where Dr Google comes in. Read full post »

Striving For “Polygamy” In The Digital Age

Dr Stephen Ludwig, one of my most treasured mentors from medical school gave a speech last year that he entitled, “Striving For Polygamy.”  I didn’t get to hear it live but I’ve read the speech many times since then. He wasn’t talking about polygamy like you’d expect. Rather, he spoke to the goal of balancing a set of  marriages described by the poet David Whyte in his book, The Three Marriages. The goal for all of us might be balancing 3 essential marriages in our lives: a marriage to our family, a marriage to our work, and a marriage to ourselves. Where social and digital media fit into this “polygamy” remains unknown. That’s where we’re all working hard to find harmony with our devices, as seemingly technology lives in all 3 of these spheres.

Think about it. How often do we take the time to put all three of these marriages on the table? I certainly don’t balance these well all the time. Although I believe in compartmentalization, the act of prioritizing ourselves amidst our deadlines while in the presence of our beautiful children is a challenge. Often when we’re raising young children we fall out of balance–the necessary daily tasks in raising children to adulthood take over while pushing other commitments asunder. When coupled with work, our personal care suffers. This imbalance creates a work-family frenzy for so many of us where we’re left with a dearth of time for personal reflection and much less silence.

In a quest for silence, I’m taking a 1 month sabbatical from the blog. Last August I took a sabbatical away from social tools to create more space and time with my children and more time in search of reflection and quiet. Stillness.

Technology and ever-available networks, communities, work inboxes, and devices have incredible and essential utility in improving our lives and our health. But so does the real, quiet world. I’ll be back in September. In the meantime, I’ll be with my family and friends, my patients, and the ever-elusive silence that surrounds us.

24 Hours Offline

I took 24 hours offline from Friday at sundown through Saturday at sunset. I didn’t use my phone, I didn’t text, I didn’t log onto a computer, and all the while I didn’t enter a single network. I didn’t blog, tweet, Facebook, or LinkIn. I was genuinely unplugged without entering the wilderness. I was at home in Seattle devoid of my devices on my second annual digital sabbath.

I went shopping for a friend’s birthday gift by myself, the quiet liberating. I went to a baby shower, I played  baseball with the boys outside, I cleaned up the back yard. And while the sun shone in Seattle on Saturday afternoon, F and I cuddled on the driveway. We laid down on the pavement and looked up at the sky. We didn’t talk much and even with the paucity of words, the moment takes up a big part of my long-term memory. Little F returned twice to join me on that hard surface, grabbing for my hand amidst the concrete. Presence is very soft no matter how hard the earth below you.

No beeps, dings, or directories distracted. It was a day much slower than the rest.

The lesson is simple of course. Twenty four hours without distraction are exceptionally bright. The loss from being disconnected online is overwhelmingly  surpassed by the gains acquired with being present offline. And although it’s easy for many of you, this unplugged time is an utter luxury for me in the time of exceptional connectivity and work online.

There’s nothing I would do to reverse my time offline. It was rich and it’s solidified the need to establish a new goal to make time for a more frequent digital sabbatical. I want to seek solace routinely from the deluge of content, information, exceptional wisdom, and friendship I gain while online and return to the spaces without distraction that house the same things.

Join me? Will you take earnest 24-hour periods of time without technology, too? Do you think your kids will notice?

A Dr, Patient, And An Insurer Walk Into A…

When I was a medical student and resident physician, those around me taught me how to distrust the pharmaceutical industry and how to distrust the insurance companies. The drug companies just wanted the public to buy their medications (to get rich) and the insurance companies just wanted to block services for my patients (to get rich).

The more I learn as a physician, the more I realize how little I know.

The great thing about the extensive travel I’ve been enduring lately is that I learn to see the world differently. This week I participated on a panel at SXSW (called: A Dr, Patient, & Insurer Walk Into A Social Network) where I had the opportunity to share my thoughts as a doctor alongside a patient advocate/technologist and an insurer.

The technologist sees the world like this:

We envision a world where information exchange between patients, doctors, pharmaceutical companies, researchers and the healthcare industry can be free and open; where, in doing so, people do not have to fear discrimination, stigmatization or regulation; and where the free flow of information helps everyone.  We envision a future where every patient benefits from the collective experience of all, and where the risk and reward of each possible choice is transparent and known.

The Insurer sees the world like this:

We believe we can help create a better health care system. This belief drives our daily decisions as one of the nation’s leading health care benefits companies. We work hard to provide our members with information and resources to help them make informed decisions about their health.

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Cell Phone Parenthood

I loved a recent NYT article where Dr Eric Topol described Americans as surgically connected to their phones.  He also described the great opportunity that resides within the phones for getting and providing better health care. These phones are a part of our future and can be exceptional partners in measuring and preserving our wellness. These mobile devices and apps will increasingly put the patient at the center of their own care. Dr Bryan Vartabedian summarized Dr Topol’s book and reminded us that, “medicine is increasingly anchored by the individual.” Thank goodness.

But the balance of how we value and use these astoundingly powerful pocket tools remains mysterious for some of us. There is a growing body of work about the addictive properties of smart cell phones. And although I hear a lot about how we should advise our children and teens to manage their digital device use, I don’t hear as much about how we as parents can do the same.

There are countless blogs and loud rants that cross my desk (phone, I mean) shouting for moms and dads to get off their phone when they are with their children. They look a lot like this:

Now Mr Palmer wasn’t yelling at me this morning (or maybe he was), rather he was responding to some data I shared about cell phone use: 1 and 3 adults say they frequently use their cell phones at the dinner table. Read full post »

I’m A Physician On Twitter: Patient Privacy

On Monday night, Dr Bryan Vartabedian, a pediatric gastroenterologist in Texas, wrote a blog post about physician behavior on Twitter. In the world of health and social media, it’s caused a near nuclear explosion of thought, an outpouring of opinion, and most importantly a much-needed discussion. Discourse is perfect for progress.

I think about this all the time.

In the post, Doctor V called out an anonymous physician blogger and tweeter, (@Mommy_Doctor), on her tweets about a patient suffering from an embarrassing and painful medical condition. Nearly 100 comments later and numerous other blog posts, physicians and patients are openly battling and exchanging perspectives.

I wonder, what do you think? I rarely write about patients directly. More, I write about what I learn from patients. I never want a patient or family member to stumble upon anything I write and wonder if I’m writing about them. When I have written about patients, I have asked permission and even then, waited for a period of time before writing about them to avoid the time-stamp the internet provides. Read full post »

Finding Friends Online

As I work to encourage more physicians and health care workers to join me in social media, I stopped yesterday, to reflect on how much I enjoy and have grown personally and professionally because of my online community. Social media tools certainly aren’t just about what I say–my community online is far more about what I learn. I have made some real friends via social networks and Twitter. This virtual space is very real to me. My patients and families in clinic tell me this often, too. I have a whole new set of comprehensions, friendships, and perspectives because of these friends (and foes). Social spaces are important to me. Although I’m constantly out of balance and need to find more time to unplug, I wouldn’t ever want to leave this cyber space. I’d simply miss my friends. Many of them live far away; I can’t invite them over to dinner.

Last week I tweeted about a dream I had about Dooce. She’s the queen bee of mommy bloggers. I’ve never met her (would love to, clearly) and thus my thoughts metamorphosed into a dream. I’m a big teller of dreams. Haven’t you had a vivid dream about someone, run into them the following day, and felt you knew them much better? All fictional, maybe, but relevant to your reality. I usually out myself and share my dream. Foolish maybe. Most others, it appears, worry about the vulnerability of doing so. So recently it was a treat to check my email amidst a very busy day when… Read full post »