‘toddler’

All Articles tagged ‘toddler’

Eye Candy: PODS And Capsules

Laundry and dishwashing capsules & “PODS” are all the rage. Frankly, I love them. They’re less messy, take up far less space in the cabinet, and enticing to use. Throw them in the washer without a single errant drop. They’re pretty to look at, too.

That’s the trouble though.

These PODS and capsules look more like Halloween candy than laundry detergent. But this soap [eye candy] poses a unique and dangerous risk. The film that forms the capsule is designed to dissolve quickly. Toddlers are at risk, as small children explore with their mouths not only their hands. Toddlers and preschoolers may be both drawn to the visual appeal of these concentrated capsules and to their balloon-like texture and squishy feel. I wrote (did a video) about this earlier, when WA State issued a warning to all ER doctors.

Concerns for ingestions are continuing here (nearly 3000 injuries were reported in US children between January and August, 2012) and around the world. Highly concentrated laundry detergent can erode tissues, cause swelling, and cause burns to the mouth, throat, airway, and eyes of children who touch, break open or ingest them. The majority of injuries from PODS and capsules have been due to ingestion, but there are reports of many eye injuries as well.

Curiosity rules a toddler’s exploration. Judgment lags way behind.

New information released last week in the UK helps categorize the concerns. The National Poison Information Center shared a brief where they detailed that capsules and PODS were the most commonly reported ingestions in young children over a 14-month period. A group of physicians at The Royal Hospital For Sick Children in Glasgow also authored an academic letter detailing their concerns, reporting on 5 children who had been admitted and cared for in the hospital after ingesting (eating) the PODS/capsules. Their letter highlighted:

Ingestion Injury From Detergent PODS & Capsules:

  • 5 children, between 10 and 22 months of age, were admitted to the hospital with serious injuries.
  • Injuries for the 5 children included serious swelling and damage to the throat and airway (arytenoids, glottis, supraglottis, esophagus, gastro-esophageal junction). Children demanding hospitalization varied in the care needed. One was managed with steroids and antibiotics alone, while the other 4 children demanded intensive care. Four of the 5 children needed breathing tubes, 2 of whom were on the ventilator for a week.
  • Fortunately, all children recovered from their ingestions.

Protecting Children From Detergent PODS/Capsules:

  • Young children are ruled by curiosity. Make sure that capsules and PODS are up and out of reach.
  • Don’t display them due to their visual appeal.
  • Don’t allow young children to help use the laundry or dishwashing capsules. Becoming familiar will likely cause them to want to touch, explore, and possibly gnaw on these capsules.
  • Until containers selling these products have a child safety lock/top, inform your friends and caregivers about the risk to young children.
  • With any ingestion, no matter what the size, call poison control immediately 1-800-222-1222.
  • Read more about it (including my interview) at US News & World Report or here at WebMD.
  • Print out this Poison Control fact sheet for your daycare or pediatricians’ office.

 

Reassuring Infant And Toddler Communication: When Not To Worry About Autism

Many parents worry about their child’s development at one point in time. With each of my boys, I had worries about their communication and thought their language delays or behaviors signaled something serious. That might just be the “worrier” in me, but it might just be the “mom” in me, too. Competitive parenting makes us all a little nuts…

Here’s a few signs that your child is developing great communication skills on time. However, if at any time you worry that your child isn’t expressing joy, communicating thoughts, or reflecting an understanding of your language, visual cues, and behavior talk with your child’s doctor. If you don’t feel heard or continue to worry, schedule another visit. If you still worry, contact another doctor for a second opinion. Instincts serve us very well when it comes to parenthood. Further, find some peace of mind if your child is doing many of the behaviors listed below!

Reassuring Developmental Milestones For Infants & Children

  • Responds to her name between 9-12 months of age.
  • Smiles by 2 months, laughs and giggle around 4-5 months, expresses great joy to your humor around 6 months.
  • Plays and thinks peek-a-boo is funny around 9 months of age.
  • Makes eye contact with people during infancy.
  • Tries to say words you say between 12 and 18 months of age.
  • Your toddler uses 5 words by 18 months of age.
  • Copies your gestures like pointing, clapping, or waving.
  • Imitates you — ie pretends to stir a bowl of pancake mix when you give them a spoon and bowl or pretends to talk on the phone with a play cell phone.
  • Shakes head “no.”
  • Waves “bye-bye” by 15 months of age.
  • Points to show you something interesting or points to get your attention by 18 months of age.

Flying With Toddlers: Tips For Distraction, Tips For Tantrums

Flying with toddlers is far more difficult than flying with an infant in my opinion. It’s the need to get up, run the aisles, move around, have another snack, read a different book, take an abbreviated nap, go pee, and that minute-attention span that makes it not only exhausting but nerve-racking for most of us. Although the challenge is real, success comes with having a good plan, allowing extra time, and packing the right snacks, toys, and books to keep your toddler occupied. That 3,000 mile flight at 30,000 feet can be a ton of fun! The above tip came from a friend years ago. Prepare for the worst and expect the best when flying with toddlers–hopefully this blue tape idea sticks. (ha)

Now dealing with tantrums while up in the air is another challenge in and of itself. Many of us heard about the toddler kicked off an airplane, and have also heard about the opinion for commercial airline children-free flights. Although I wholeheartedly disagree that we should segregate flights by age, I do think these stories in the news media elevate our anxiety for flying with our children. Don’t let it. You’re always the best one to support and help your child on the ground or up in the air. Don’t let the public shake that truth. My tips for dealing with tantrums at 35,000 feet aren’t very different from those on the ground: provide consistency, provide distraction, and provide comfort. But more, set yourself up for success by clearing the tension with passengers sitting next to you ahead of time. Acknowledge the challenge. I’ve found it not only decreases my own anxiety, it allows for a much better reception when things don’t go as planned.  Click to read full post for my additional 1-minute video explanation and a few ideas. What are yours? Read full post »

18 Months: Seattle Mama Doc 101

18 month-olds are extremely determined,  constantly challenging, tenacious, adorable, witty, and ever-aware. By 18 months, most babies have really figured out how to get and hold a parent’s attention! As they explore their widening world, an 18 month-old’s curiosity leads while their judgment lags well behind. Providing your child with a safe and consistent environment is paramount. Development in all areas (gross motor, personal and social, fine motor, etc) is highly variable but the video reviews typical milestones your baby’s clinician will review around 18 months of age.

What Should My Baby Do At 18 Months?

In general by 18 months, your toddler will be very curious. They will be demanding. They will be communicating wants and needs through words, motions, and imitations. They will be pointing out objects in the sky. They will be calling you by a name just as they run the opposite way…

 18 month milestones

“Mr No” – I found this extensive list of milestones and observations both very entertaining and educational

What Parents Can Do For 18 Month-Olds:

  • Give your 18 month-old their space. As they crave more and more autonomy, provide them times for a bit of freedom.
  • Let your child mimic you. Give them toys or safe objects you use in the house so that they can pretend to be an adult.
  • Let them help. Start finding daily or weekly “chores” for your 18 month-old (ie bringing napkins to the table or moving stuffed animals to a bin). They’ll love their role!
  • Offer puzzles, matching, and sorting games.
  • Read to your 18 month-old every single day. Point out objects in the book. Ask your toddler to tell you the names of animals or toys in the book. Get them involved. And get ready to read the same book over and over and over again!
  • Keep rules to a minimum. Rather, define “right” from “wrong” for your child and remember to praise your 18 month-old for doing things right. Catch them when they are being good!

Sleep Through The Night

Getting your baby to sleep through the night is a major milestone for baby and for you. If I had to distill down the best sleep advice I’ve ever heard it would be these 4 things:

  • Your consistency with the sleep routine is far more important than what method you choose to help get your baby to sleep. The ritual at bedtime (reading, bath, rocking, etc) is one of the most important daily activities you establish for your child from day 1 (or day 30).
  • Letting your baby learn to fall asleep all on her own at 1 to 2 months of age will serve you and your child again and again. Research shows that infants and children who are allowed to learn to self-soothe and get themselves to sleep will often be far better sleepers, even as adults. Consider letting your baby learn to self-soothe and “cry it out” in the middle of the night after 4 to 6 months of age.
  • If you’re concerned about your baby’s sleep challenges, talk directly with their doc. Recent research found that 1 in 10 children under age 3 has a sleep challenge, and often sleep trouble persists from infancy to toddlerhood.
  • Sleep needs to be a priority (for us all). Making sacrifices to support routine bedtimes and sleep routines will always be worth it.

Pee, Patience, And Parenting At 35,000 Feet

Recently while on the plane, O wet his pants. Lovely really. He’d refused to pee prior to getting on the plane. Refused to pee at home. Essentially, O refused to pee “on command.” No surprise for a strong-willed-spirited just turned 3 year-old. And after he wet his pants, he then proceeded to have about 14 accidents (yes, I’m exaggerating) later that same day as we traveled to his grandparents’ home. Instead of being patient, supportive, and perfect, the husband and I realized we were just plain-old disappointed. And full of judgment.

Potty training takes patience, perseverance and a positive attitude. Many days we don’t have all three, all at once.

O had mastered his potty-trained world well over the last month or so and the wetting accidents weren’t on our to-do list. He’d been dry all day for a number of weeks. The frequency he was wetting on that particular Wednesday coupled with the inconvenience of it being a travel day just wasn’t my pleasure. Although he’d delayed pooping in the potty for a few months (also totally normal but uber-frustrating, too), that had all resolved some months back. The accidents felt like an inconvenience. And although as a pediatrician, I know how to lend advice in this area, it’s the taking advice part that is more of a challenge.

After age 3, when a child shows resistance to using the potty the “right” thing to do, is to carry on with a smile, stop providing reminders for your child, show that you’re unflappable and continue to praise success. Ignore potty failures, praise potty success.

But it is a seriously difficult task at 35,000 feet when surrounded by pee. Consequently, we spent part of the holiday nudging each other about how terrible we were and how we needed to move from D&J (disappointed and judging) to P&C (patient and compassionate).

Read full post »

What Can Babies Do At 12 Months? Seattle Mama Doc 101

I found my sons’ first birthdays very emotional. Magical, even. Looking back provided great perspective on how much can happen in 1 year of time. What our children accomplish in the first 12 months is simply astonishing.

Expected milestones at 1 year of age:

AAP’s comprehensive summary of 12 Month Milestones

CDC’s Important Milestones By The End of 1 Year (English & Spanish)

First Movie With My 4 Year Old


I’ve had media on my mind lately. And Finn McMissile, I’ve got my eye on you.

We took F (age 4 1/2 years) to his first movie about a month ago. It is something we’ve been talking about for over a year. He’d built up a sense of anticipation that we could have bottled. F is a focused boy. The only movie he has chosen to watch from start to finish his entire life is the original Cars. So with the news of Cars 2 coming to the big screen, we plotted our first big family trip to the cinema. F lost sleep with anticipation. He studied (and slept with) the New York Times synopsis. The NYT review, we didn’t share with him…

What age did you first take your child to a movie? Did you go because of a certain film or because the timing was right?

I’m asking because I think although there is no perfect answer (3, 4, 5, or 6), I wish our first movie had gone better. All in all, our experience was a great success in the eyes of my son, but Pixar let me down. As did Finn McMissile.

McMissile, why the unnecessary ammo? Read full post »

Potty Training: Reward Chart Glory

Maaaaaaajor milestone in our house today. O filled up his first reward chart for potting training. Even bigger, last night just before he went to bed, O and I discussed that he only had two spaces left on the chart. Once filled, he gets a special trip to the toy store. Although seemingly unclear about the rules and benefits of the chart last night, he told me he would wait until morning to pee.

Thing is, he did.

He awoke with a dry diaper. We felt like lottery winners! O went to the bathroom, peed in the toilet, and then came to find me this morning. His 4 1/2 year old brother did the reporting:

“O peed much more than we thought he could this morning, Mommy.”

I was astonished. I went to the toilet to see the evidence. Dark yellow bowl of pee. Immense pride….I think my heart pushed out a double-beat. Read full post »

Forever My Baby

Being a parent is entirely overwhelming. Yes I know, we hold it together about 99.9% of the time, but there are these little windows where our fractures are evident. Or where our Mama/Papa-Achilles is wide open, taught and stretched. Or the beats of time where we get to let our knees buckle beneath the weight of our world. Where we give into the love we feel, the desperation of certain moments, the lack of control over things, and the slipping moments that occur each and every day as our children grow–where we feel we lose parts of them, and then simultaneously gain bits and pieces of who they become.

A pediatric partner of mine once told me that she felt the toddler and preschool years were the most intimate time of parenthood. I think about it all the time. It actually haunts me on some level, as if I’ll lose this proximity with my boys as time marches forward. That I won’t have this utter closeness. That the kisses at the cubby really will come to an end.

Last night, I buckled a little bit. I was also reminded that my pediatrician partner may be wrong.

Before bed, O (he’s 2 1/2 now) and I somehow migrated into his bedroom alone. Usually we read books together with his brother, but last night it was just the two of us while the husband read to F. He reached for a dreaded book and handed it to me. I wanted to shake my head. It was clear: he insisted. Of course I consented to read it but as I opened the cover, my stomach flipped. I knew I was in for a doozy. It had been a tiring day and I was weak in the knees with love for my boys. The book: Read full post »