‘water safety’

All Articles tagged ‘water safety’

Your Friend’s Pool: Drowning Risk

New research shows that there is a 6-fold increased risk for drowning when at the pool of a friend or relative.* Something about being at the home of a friend or relative may change the way we supervise our children. In the Florida study, 79% of patients that were seen in an ER for drowning accidents were at a home pool.

We also know that young children under age 5 drown more in home swimming pools than anywhere else. Anyone can drown in any body of water. But more than anything else I can say, know that children are more vulnerable to drowning due to their size, maturity level, insatiable curiosity, swimming skill level, familiarity with water, and communication skills. Babies and children can drown in any collection of water over 2 inches deep. The Florida research also shows that where we are and who we’re around while swimming may change levels of supervision and distraction.

Plan Ahead When Children Swim in Pools:

  1. Never let anyone swim alone.
  2. When swimming, young children need constant eyes-on, non-distracted supervision. Put down the book, put down the cell phone, and put down the alcohol. As best you can, focus only on your children. There are too many tragic stories of quick phone calls and book chapters that have left children unprotected. If you’re at a party, designate one adult to provide constant supervision.
  3. Know about safety equipment present at the pool, watch for risks from entrapment around drains, pool covers and pool equipment, and have a phone nearby. Call 911 immediately if you’re concerned about a potential drowning accident — seconds matter.
  4. Enroll your children in swimming lessons and update their skills every single year. However, never trust swimming lessons to be protective for drowning. Your supervision is paramount. I’ll post more on this next week.

Drowning injuries and deaths are preventable but often silent and quick. Young children under age 5 drown more than any other group, but nearly 1000 children die annually from drowning.

 Resources on Drowning Prevention

*When I say “drowning victims” in the video, I didn’t mean to imply all those patients in the study died. Of the 100 study subjects with drowning accidents, only 10% had life-ending drowning accidents. Fortunately, 90% of the patients that presented to the ER after a drowning accident survived and had full neurologic recovery.

Preventing Scald Burns: Mama Doc 101

Scald burns are common injuries for young children that arise when our skin or our mouths and mucus membranes have contact with burning hot liquids or steam. Children under age 5 account for nearly 1 in every 5 burn victims each year in the United States. The bathroom and kitchen are the typical danger zones. Many burns come from liquids heated in the microwave but children are also commonly burned from scalding liquids or water heated on the stove or in the shower or tub. The video details ways to protect your children (and family) from a terrible burn. Fortunately, you can improve your child’s safety in a matter of seconds: today, turn your water heater down to 120 degrees Fahrenheit.

Preventing Scald Burns in Children

Be protective of young children around hot liquids from day one. Never carry hot tea or coffee while holding your baby. Insist on the same from anyone who has the privilege of holding your baby.  I’ve taken care of infants with severe burns and plenty of older children. Severe burns are not only extremely painful and onerously traumatic, they can lead to serious health complications and lasting disfigurement. Now is the time to protect your child.

Why Burn Doctors Hate Instant Soup

Safe Kids Fact Sheet

Home Safety Council Handout

Drowning: Quieter, Faster, & Closer Than You Think

Two teenagers died in New York yesterday. Not from a gun shot, a car crash, or suicides. Rather, they drowned in a popular swimming hole in the Bronx river on a hot summer day. I hate stories like that. Hate hearing it, hate seeing the headline. A total failure for prevention efforts.

I talk about drowning in clinic every day I see patients. I should probably talk about it more often. As I said in my earlier post outlining the new AAP Prevention of Drowning guidelines (& swimming lessons between age 1-4 yrs), drowning is the second leading cause of injury related death in children 1 to 19 years of age. And most drownings in the US happen this time of year. When it’s hot outside, the lake, stream, or pool can look really gooood. Even to those who don’t know how to swim.

I talk about drowning mostly with the parents of toddlers. But I should spend more time talking with adolescents. I get distracted by all the drugs, sex, and rock-and-roll stuff I talk about. Today, I am reminded of the importance of talking with teens about drowning, because of those teens but also this perspective about drowning.

See drowning isn’t what you think it is. It’s not loud and splashy and outrageous. It’s not like it looks in the movies… Read full post »

AAP Speaks: You Swim? Swim Lessons For Toddlers

We were on the waitlist for swim lessons for over a year. Once off the list, F went in for the first lesson (pictured here) jumped in, did a great job, and then refused to ever go back in again. We went every week, twice a week, sat on the pool deck, and watched his peers swim. We waited. We watched. He often tantrumed. Parents stared. Friends commiserated. My mom tried to tell me what to do.

But then for the last class, last week, auspiciously F jumped back in again and gave it a go. Nothing is ever quite what I expect to be. When it comes to swimming lessons, at least in my world, everyone has an opinion and maybe a plan.

Yesterday, the AAP published a revised policy statement about the prevention of drowning. Most noteworthy, they have lifted the recommendation against swim lessons before the age of 4 for most children. With a cautious brush stroke, the AAP has painted the picture that swimming lessons are okay after age 1, depending on physical, emotional and developmental maturity. For most children, it is okay to start lessons after age 1. Really, it’s up to you if you feel your toddler is ready to take the plunge. Read full post »

If It Were My Child: Infant Swimming Lessons

It turns out, I don’t think you do have to be careful what you wait for when it comes to swimming. A study published a few weeks ago suggested that children under the age of 2 were at higher risk for bronchiolitis, a common pediatric lung infection, if they swam in chlorinated pools when they were babies. I’ve mulled this over and done additional reading. If it were my child, I’d sign up for infant swimming lessons. Believe me, I’m not getting off any swim/pool wait list any time soon! Yet, I do think the study offers a chance to re-frame how we think about protecting our kids around the water.

Although O will be well over 2 years old when he gets off the decade long wait list for the pools in our area, he’ll be swimming in chlorinated pools before then. From how I see it, chlorine exposure is only one side of the story when it comes to infant swimming and safety. It’s okay, maybe even wonderful if I dare say, to swim with an infant. The video we have from F swimming in the first time is hilarious. I am far more ecstatic than any normal human should be in a pool. It’s true; most babies simply love the water. So do plenty of adults (read: me).

Swimming if not only delightful, it is also dangerous. Worldwide, drowning while swimming is the 2nd most common injury that kills children under age of 14. Therefore how our infants and children come to know the water may be as important as how we think about using car seats. Read full post »