The minute we become parents we immediately start to hone in on the value of our children’s sleep. Their growth, their feeding, their development and their sometimes labile temperament quickly illustrate the import of real rest in our lives. Many parents advertise their commitment to their child’s sleep as a huge parenting win. Those of us who struggle with it, we often admit defeat. It’s clear, pretty early in infancy, that sleep transforms who we are, how we think and how we live from day one. Our babies are savvy professors in this regard.

Modern parenting conversations are teasing out the value of child sleep versus the value of adult sleep in multiple ways. In some cases, it’s the tug-o-war and battle-of-minds while discussing data and beliefs around when to let a baby cry-it-out. Working parents often report on their inability to sleep in the early working/baby years. In the U.S. we constantly revere those who don’t sleep a lot  — productivity seems to trump wellness in the hierarchy: there are politicians, profressional athletes and successful business people who brag about their capacity and earnest commitment to their craft via the lens of accomplishing greatness on minimum sleep. All this, despite the mounds of research that find health and performance benefit from a good night’s rest.

No question it’s culturally acceptable (if not culturally desirable) to sacrifice our own sleep for our children’s. I’m uncertain there are hard and fast rules here about which is more important but I speak with sleep expert, Dr. Maida Chen about the value of sleep routinely. We decided to share some perspectives on sleep (see the video) because I wonder:

What about you? What about your sleep?

Just this morning someone commented on the intensity with which I work and suggested (like so many do) that I must not sleep. I was happy to report that I’m all in for improving things, but that I also have spent a good deal of energy these past years making great time to sleep at night, while also carving out time to love-up those in my life who consume my heart. I think there is a better way to care for ourselves and it may start with 7 or 8 hours a night with our eyes closed.

Support For The Value of Sleep

In the video we mention a bit of data. Read more here: