6-1 baby in waterWarm weather is here and summer is approaching and if mother nature is kind, we’ll have plenty of sun-filled days over the next few months to spend by the pool or at the beach. Unfortunately, this is also the time of year when drownings increase. Young children are especially high-risk because of their profound curiosity around water and lack of awareness of danger.

Drownings are preventable deaths but even the thought of them spooks most of us. Often, a drowning event looks, sounds, and appears unlike we’d expect. I’ve written before about the silent danger of drowning, but rather than reiterate the warnings of how to prevent drowning, this year I wanted to find out what you should do if you realize your child is actually drowning. Put a couple thoughts and tools in your hands to know WHAT to do if faced with an emergency.

I tapped Dr. Linda Quan, an emergency attending physician and drowning expert at Seattle Children’s for information on what to do if you come upon a infant/toddler, school-age child or teenager is drowning. Preparing for this can help boost awareness and response if ever you support or discover an infant or young toddler in need for rescue.

Drowning In Infants Is Different Than Older Children

Children ages 1 to 4 have the highest drowning rates. Because they are so small in stature and often easier to retrieve, drowning prevention for infants and toddlers will always be more important than water rescue techniques. Never leave children alone in or near the water, even for a minute. This includes the bath, a kiddy pool, a pond, a river, lake or larger pool. Close supervision is vital in preventing water-related injuries and drowning. Since it only takes seconds for a child to slip silently under the water, parents need to make sure there is always a lifeguard on duty, or another adult, or a parent watching attentively when children are in or around the water. Dr. Quan says,

For an infant, a child younger than a year old, drowning usually happens in a bath tub, bucket or ornamental pond or water collection device, so rescue does not usually pose a risk to the parent or rescuer. This small child is easily pulled out of the water if within arm’s reach.

What To Do If You Think Your Baby or Toddler Is Drowning:

  1. If the child is blue or not breathing, immediately give several rescue breaths (mouth to mouth breathing).
  2. If the child does not take breaths or respond on his own, start CPR (chest compressions with ventilations).
  3. After several rounds of CPR, call 911 if they have not been called yet. The video below gives a quick overview of infant CPR. You can also check out this article for more information.

To learn more about drowning and water safety, click here.