Author Archive

Video: Infant Slings — Wonderful Way To Wear A Baby

Seattle Mama Doc Infant SlingThe U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) issued a safety warning about the use of infant slings, particularly in babies under 4 months of age. Watch this video for more information. Not all slings are born the same, so inform yourself about great sling options and the bag-type slings to avoid. And look at the infant position recommendations from the CPSC below to ensure you’re using the sling properly.

See the video at the bottom of the post.

CPSC infant position recommendations

Read full post »

Vitamin D: Vitamin Of The Year Part 2

Vitamin D SunsetVitamin D is clearly important. And like I said earlier this week, it is getting all sorts of attention. Two studies from this week have captured my attention.
I don’t think this vitamin D thing is a fad. The new (2008) recommendations for 400 International Units (IU) of daily Vitamin D in infants and children represent evolution in our understanding how we can protect and prevent illness in infants and children. It’s not that Vitamin D is more important than other vitamins, it’s just that Vitamin D is more likely to be absent in children than the others. New data this week suggests that delivering mothers (the ones with the big belly about to birth) who live in the city (are out in the great outdoors less) are more Vita D deficient that we thought. Another study finds that supplementing all infants, no matter what they eat, is essential in providing them the vitamin D they need. Vitamin D is synthesized in your body when you get some good sun (above) or from fortified foods in your diet including milk, cereal, formula or eggs and fatty fish. During the winter, getting those rays of sun is more difficult. And it’s more difficult all year long in infants who we say shouldn’t be in the sun whatsoever. So we have to ingest it. Take a look at this data and rationale for all of the D-detail.

Watch the video at the bottom of this post, too… Read full post »

Vitamin D: Seattle Vitamin Part 1

Offer Vitamin DF calls it our, “Seattle Vitamin.” In the upper left hand corner of the US (read: Seattle) we’re a little lacking in sunshine. It’s a product of not only our rainy weather, but our latitude on the globe. New data finds that taking supplemental vitamin D may be more important for we mamas, we city dwellers, and we little ones (infants) than we thought. Especially up here where the sunshine comes around about every fifth day.

Vitamins are so well engineered these days (gummy what?) my boys think they are a marvelous daily treat. So do I.

A study yesterday in Pediatrics finds that urban Boston moms (think Northern climate) who spent at least ½ of their pregnancy living in the city, were at far greater risk for having vitamin D deficiency than we thought. So were their babies! In this group of urban moms, up to 58% of newborns and 36% of the moms at the time of delivery were vitamin D deficient. Holy deluge of D deficiency! Say it with me…

A second study published yesterday found that we are doing a poor job getting babies the vitamin D they need. Less than 1/10 of all breast fed babies and less than 1/3 of formula fed babies are getting the vitamin D pediatricians recommend. Something has to change. Read full post »

Seeker.

Chemo SeekerSeeking perspective and cure. If it’s true that life is all about your perspective, I know this Friday sunshine will help.

This past week has been a total mind melting experience. Cloudy and cold, too. With my mom’s chemotherapy and subsequent complications, my perspective of medicine has changed again. Forever. Being the patient, or in this case the patient’s daughter and advocate, reminds me how hard it is to sit on the other side of the white coat. Power differentials, hierarchy, miscommunication, communication, laboratories, computers, research, trainees, and simple distance sit between the provider and the patient. They take up all sorts of space.

Invisible yet room-filing.

Above is a photo of my mom directing her chemotherapy. She felt that if she gave the chemo direction (via her powerful words and a Sharpie), the chemo’s accuracy would improve. Got to give her credit. Speaking up (even to your chemotherapy) is always essential in medicine. Read full post »

Tweet This, Cut That: Live Twitter Feed From The OR

Twurgery?

On the right side of my screen I’m watching a live Twitter feed from Swedish Hospital in Seattle.

Tweeting commenced soon after 8am this morning and was performed by 4 observers in an operating room in Seattle. Those 4 observers were in the presence of a surgical team who was performing a tumor resection on the kidney of a 69 year-old patient from California. The man had consented to the scenario, surgery, observers, twittering and all. While the surgeon did his job, his maneuvers, goals, and timed procedures were detailed on Twitter in a live feed.

It’s 10am on Wednesday as I write. I’m watching the twitter feed populate into my screen.

I must say it gives me an eerie feeling.

During medical school I assisted (translation: watched in awe and was likely told to be quiet) on a nephrectomy (removal of one entire kidney) for the same reason—a kidney mass. I remember well what the surgery looked like. This is the first time I know what it tweets like. Read full post »