Author Archive

Nut Free TV? Food Allergies In Children

I was interviewed this week on TV about food allergies. I’ve pushed all my inner-Cindy Brady moments aside. Watch the video below…

When F was about 13 months old his face turned bright red after he ate breakfast one morning. I eliminated all the foods he had eaten that morning– milk, oatmeal, banana and berries. He’d had all those foods many times but I was concerned he’d developed an allergy. Gradually, I introduced them back, one food at a time. Mild reactions returned (his face looked like a work of art, his ears turned red), but inconsistently, so I was confused. After strict re-introductions, I finally figured out cinnamon was causing his facial flushing. Turns out, regular oatmeal did nothing, but eating apple and cinnamon oatmeal he got all red goofy faced. To this day, F doesn’t complain when eating cinnamon, I just know he has ingested it when his face is covered in artful red spottiness.
We were lucky; F’s reaction was mild and limited to cinnamon. It’ still unclear to me if it is a true allergy. I consider him sensitive to it so I avoid serving him cinnamon whenever I can.
But I had a dagger of fear in my heart while trying to determine what was causing his facial rash for a few weeks. Like most parents who have children with allergies, I found the not knowing what was going to happen absolutely unnerving.

Allergies can be scary. Read full post »

This Crockpot Is Gonna Save Me

Crockery PotGame changer in our house. Splurged on a fancy crockpot last week. Big news, I know. Should have sent out a flyer.
My beloved crockpot. Regal, able, and ready like any good army, boy scout, or Labrador Retriever.

This.crockpot.is.gonna.save.me.
Last week broke me a bit. We’ve not been sleeping again. Previous memo to the boys was received and then promptly forgotten. And I’ve been sick. After busy days seeing patients, I didn’t leave my office for more than 2 hours after I was done with appointments. Twice. Didn’t even make it home in time to kiss O before he was off to bed on my “early” day. Heartbreak city.

This.crockpot.is.gonna.save.me.

Buying it was one of those, “Ah-ha, this is how I am going to balance my life” moments. Do you buy those things? They can be anything from an orange pair of socks to a closet organizer to a jumbo bottle of Advil to a new can opener. They feel like triumphs in life when you find them. In my attempt to eat right, lower my cholesterol, and live a long time, I rationalized the purchase of the large pot now inhabiting my kitchen. Healthy food made easy. I remain hopeful this crockpot is worthy of its post. Read full post »

Helping Your Baby Sleep: Follow Your Instincts & Follow Through

Video Take 1

As promised, this is my first video post. It’s 11:30pm Sunday night. It took a while to coordinate. This was take number 2. I waited for the sun (going against my previous post about when NOT to work) as that cloudy Friday light was too drab. Especially for sleep deprived parents. This afternoon it was sunny; proof that Seattle-ites really do see the sun.

This is a post about sleep. How to help your baby (and you) get more of it. What to do when you don’t know what sleep routine or method to follow. Which books to listen to and which to pass on to your friends.

There is no universal truth or method that is good for all parents. Rather, each sleep book or method caters to certain parenting styles and certain baby temperaments. The method you choose is less important than how you implement it. Consistency is essential in helping your baby sleep through the night. Pick a plan and follow through.

Read this summary of expert advice on interpreting sleep methods and talk with your pediatrician if you get confused. Or tired. Or both. And watch this video (click on full post to see it).

Things You Can Hide Under A White Coat

Drs Swanson and BisseyFlashback: fall of 2006 standing with my partner, Dr Jeff Bissey at The Everett Clinic. In some strange third trimester hormone cloud (or pregnancy delusion), I consented to a photo shoot when our new clinic was just opening. Rotund & posing at the new computer in exam room 12. After the Cindy Brady photo amalgam, I feel I’ve got little to hide. This photo is a fine example of all the things you can hide under a white coat. Even little boys!

For three years during residency, I nearly lived in that white coat and kept it buttoned up to the top. Some people criticize the white coat for it’s role in establishing hierarchy in the doctor-patient relationship. Really though, sometimes we wear it just for the pockets. Sometimes for the things we hide (a sleeveless shirt mid-July?). Don’t you wonder what your doc has hidden underneath that coat? As you can see here, late fall 2006 I was hiding something, indeed. Yes, F was born 3 weeks later.

Many pediatricians don’t wear white coats claiming it scares children. I’ve never really found that; really, it seems I’m just as scary to an 18 month old with or without it on! I think some toddlers have made their opinion about me far before I show up in the room. Something about the smell of an exam room, maybe. You know those people who say they could never work in a hospital or clinic because of the smell. Well, those 18 month olds remember…

See him there, all tucked inside, but then simultaneously reaching for the keyboard? I remember the photographer saying, “Just pull the white coat out a little farther forward, Dr Swanson”.

Click into the full post if you need help finding F in the photo. Read full post »

Keep The Book

We were in to see the pediatrician last month for F’s 3 year check up and back again last week for some booster shots for O. During both visits, the medical assistant asked me when the boys had received their H1N1 shots. She wanted to update the clinic’s record. I told her the 31st of October. She came back into the room puzzled,“The State of WA has them recorded on 10/24/10.”

Well, yes, she and the State of Washington were right, I was wrong. You’d think a pediatrician could keep this straight. Well, no, as it turns out. With my over-saturated and over-filled Mama brain, perfectly dated info on shots may be data points that may slip out my right ear. You too, yes? It took me 5 drawers and over a 1/2 hour to locate O’s book (above) to snap that photo. Clearly, organization of personal shot cards is not listed on my CV.
A study last week points out carrying an immunization record for your child can improve their health by increasing the likelihood of staying up to date on shots. When the boys got their H1N1 shots, I didn’t bring their immunization record books. I was all hyped up and excited about getting them and forgot due to my relative glee. I was given a little card at the time, but didn’t transfer the dates into their official books.  After discussing and reviewing my trusty phone calendar, we figured it out. Not a big deal but it wasted precious time for the staff in the clinic. Read full post »