Author Archive

I’m Not Eating Meat Raised With Antibiotics Anymore

A lot of people don’t eat meat for all sorts of reasons. You know why: their health, the environment, they don’t want to eat animals, just doin’ the right thing for the planet. I’ve gone through times in my life where I didn’t eat meat. Now I do again. The more I learn about health care, the more certain I am that as I go forward eating meat and preparing it for my family, I can use science to guide me to do it in smarter ways.

Being smarter about how we eat meat makes sense. This includes not consuming nitrates (cancer risk) and preservatives when we don’t have to, but also choosing meat raised without unnecessary antibiotics. Smarter meat-eating involves creating a demand for meat that’s safer for us and the population. Antibiotics used to raise animals for meat production aren’t always in our best interest, health-wise.

Animal agriculture uses 4x the amount of antibiotics as human medicine, so buying meat not raised with antibiotics is without a doubt a way towards a safer world where antibiotics can be reserved for use in helping us. Antibiotics aren’t used when raising farm animals to make the meat on your kitchen counter safer — raw or undercooked meat is still a biohazard, even if raised with lots of antibiotics — you can still get an infection from meat raised with antibiotics. Antibiotics are often used to raise animals in crowded or less ideal conditions to help prevent them from getting infections. The more antibiotics we use anywhere, the the more we’ll see resistant bacteria everywhere. So reducing demand for meat/animals raised in conditions demanding more antibiotics is a good thing. Moving forward, I’m raising my hand to eat meat (whenever possible) not raised with unnecessary antibiotics.*

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When Joy & Science Meet In Parenthood

I gave this little talk at Children’s recently about where joy and science meet– a lunchtime chat about life and balance and work and loving up our children. Ultimately, it was a sincere privilege to think of sharing a little bit of science and a lot of stories from my own tightrope walk as a mom to boys. I spoke about about how we get this done while bearing witness to our children and their enormity, while also working on our careers. In my mind it’s a messy palette of colors we use when watercoloring our lives as our children grow and make themselves into adults. We have big chewy highs and bits of beauty all the time. We also feel miserable when we don’t live up to what we’d hope for ourselves as parents. We all worry. It can be a little ugly. We all house doubt about who we are as parents. But joy is abundant in this lifetime with children and teens and little tips may help us connect with it more often…

There was a lot in this talk not included in the slides and images in the above Prezi, but hopefully you can enjoy a few of the lessons if you click on through it. Even Will Ferrell makes an appearance. I hope they invite me back even though I might have used a swear word or something. Read full post »

Online Interventions Improve Vaccination Rates

The flu season is upon us and I hate to be so prescriptive, but when it comes to avoiding influenza, I feel like I have to be. I get the flu vaccine each year as does my entire family — I think you should, too. I’m passionate about vaccines and have had the luxury of blogging and deploying vaccine science education to the world since I began the Seattle Mama Doc blog in 2009. I’ve been particularly vocal about the flu shot and have leveraged traditional, digital and social media tools ever since I began. I’ve used my blog, book, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and my podcast to share information about recommendations and rationale for why a flu shot makes sense for every infant over 6 months, child, teen, and adult. Of anything I’ve learned over the years, it’s this: building public insight into why this annual flu vaccine recommendation makes sense, is a marathon…it’s not a little sprint. Influenza can be a nasty virus with life-threatening and life-ending complications and it’s an ongoing obligation to ensure everyone in this country understands ways to decrease risk.

Data is on our side that online efforts in social media are worthwhile for spreading valuable research, expertise, and education. Every parent wants their child to stay healthy and live long into adulthood. Those who decline/defer vaccinations or don’t get the flu vaccine are clearly no different in that regard when compared to parents who do immunize with flu vaccine. But levels of trust and understanding for the science of safety in vaccinations between the groups may differ.

Thankfully, new research shows these online efforts by doctors like me may help families understand rationale for immunizations, especially if moms were educated even before the baby was born. A study published this morning in Pediatrics leaves those of us sharing information online validated in our efforts.

US Study Finds Blogs And Social Media Influence Infant Vaccine Status:

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6 Tips To Help A Child With Autism Eat Better

There are ways to support picky eaters and children who refuse new foods. I’m back with Dr. Dolezal further discussing feeding challenges for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The first post explored why children with Autism have challenges with eating (almost 90% do). I often say that a typically developing child will not starve with a full refrigerator, but this advice just doesn’t hold up with ASD children. I love Ellyn Satter’s advice and mission in helping adults and children be joyful and confident with eating. Her resource and guidance inspires a “division of responsibility” that basically a parent’s role is most simply to provide great healthy food and a child’s job is to choose what and how much of it to eat. But we have to acknowledge that parents to children with ASD need more information about challenges and often far more support. Here are Dr. Dolezal’s 6 tips to help a child with autism, or any child who choses to eat only a few, certain foods, eat better.

Children who graze are really not open to trying new things. — Dr. Dolezal

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Why Children With Autism Struggle With Eating

If you’re a parent to a child on the autism spectrum, take some comfort in knowing that up to about 90% of children with autism struggle with significant eating challenges. You are NOT alone in this. The challenges can range from picky eating to dependence upon PediaSure or g-tube for caloric intake. We know that children thrive in an expected world. But children with autism can take that to the margin where a preoccupation with sameness can drive them to eat only the same thing every day. Despite these staggering numbers, there are evidenced-based treatments and models of care that can help improve the lives of children and families from a nutritional and quality of life perspective. I had the pleasure of having Dr. Danielle Dolezal on the podcast to discuss this topic. The first podcast here is an overview of why children with Autism Spectrum disorders have these challenges with eating.

Rigidity and sameness contributes greatly to feeding picture. Eating is one of the most sensory experiences you can have.” ~Dr. Dolezal

Dr. Dolezal is the Clinical Supervisor of the Pediatric Feeding Program at Seattle Children’s Autism Center. She’s super smartypants and created the highly sought after (nearly 500 families on the wait list, unfortunately) interdisciplinary team model and program at the Autism Center. That means patients that have multiple factors contributing to feeding issues (medical, skill, motor, physiologic, and psychology) get to see a variety of team members under 1 roof. She started off her career with a masters in special education with special emphasis in early childhood and children who struggle with severe challenging behavior. She then got her PhD in child psychology with further emphasis in behavior analysis specializing in feeding disorders and severe challenging behavior. So needless to say….she knows her stuff. Her podcast is so good. Insistence on sameness is a common theme and can be horribly challenging for families who worry about their child’s nutrition.

A Few Quick Tips:

  • Try to not let your child slip into patterns of grazing, which is very common and leads to disrupted hunger/satiety patterns. This makes it difficult for them to try new foods because they graze to take the edge of the hunger all day long and are never really sitting down to eat a full meal at set meal times. They will be more apt and ready to try new foods if you keep to a set schedule. They don’t have to stay seated in a seat. They can stand up. But the food stays at the table.
  • Try celebrating and reinforce flexibility with something the child is already doing. So if they are eating dry/crunchy textures, try branching out to ANY type of cracker. Go from white cheddar Cheez-It to regular Cheez-It. Celebrate that as a new learning experience and new demonstration of flexibility.

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