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Alternating Acetaminophen And Ibuprofen For Fever

Lessening a fever in your baby or child, with multiple medicines, can be tricky. And it may not always be necessary. Many pediatricians urge avoiding “fever phobia” and allowing a fever to stick around, especially if your child is acting well. See this recent piece, “The Case For Letting Fevers Run Their Course,” by Dr. Paul Offit, an infectious disease expert on this take, the data behind it, and why fevers can sometimes help children fight infection.

Lots of families consider alternating medications like acetaminophen and ibuprofen at home to treat pain and fever, but I’m unconvinced that this leads to better outcomes for kids and/or improved fever control. It’s not my recommendation that you try alternating medications, and this post is not here to endorse this approach, rather if you choose to, I’m hopeful that this will help you do it more safely.

It’s important to note that the dosing amount for one medicine AND the duration of time between doses for medicines can be different from one medicine to another. So it can get confusing, FAST. However, armed with a plan, alternating medicines can be a good way to feel in control of supporting your child with medicines that relieve fever, improving your child’s behavior and comfort.

First….and I know I said this but I gotta say it again: it’s not necessary to treat every fever. And it’s certainly not ideal to treat the numbers on the thermometer. What always matters most is how your child looks to you and how they appear. Fever is a natural response of the immune system — it’s a response to illness, not illness itself. Fever ultimately can be productive and may assist your child’s body in fighting off infection. There may be no reason to make a fever disappear if your child is otherwise acting well, playful, and staying hydrated.

Second…there are some fevers that do require a visit with the pediatricians. It’s important to seek care when fever persists after 3 days in infants and children, any fever in a baby 3 month old or less, and if fever is over 104 degrees it’s wise to get support. Talk to your doctor before giving a pain reliever or fever reducer containing ibuprofen if your baby is younger than 6 months. Talk to your doctor before giving acetaminophen to a child younger than 2 years to obtain the proper dosing instructions, or see charts below.
Before giving your child any medicines, make sure you know your child’s weight. Dosing is always based on a child’s weight, not age.

Last… trust your instincts! If your child looks unwell in the face of fever and doesn’t seem to be improving as you would expect, call your pediatrician for help! If the fever is unexpected in a way, consider calling in to get support and education.

Ok…now that we’ve got all that out of the way, here is one way you can alternate between medicines (acetaminophen and ibuprofen) every 3-4 hours: Read full post »

After The Vegas Shooting: What To Do Now And How To Talk To Children About Firearms

In the wake of the recent Las Vegas shooting, I went on the Seattle NBC affiliate, KING5 News, to discuss how to talk to your children about guns and violence. Frankly, it’s not the first time I’ve covered this topic and as horrifying as it is, it probably won’t be last. I’m upset and sad that these shootings are becoming a part of American culture and I’m committed to doing my best to learn and translate what the experts advise us to do to decrease deaths from firearms.

I have lost people I love dearly to firearms so like so many of you, this is personal.

No question that we can feel helpless after horrific events. Focus on what you can do and share that with your children. If there is a gun in your home, keep it locked, unloaded & separate from ammunition. Remember that exposure to violent media and violent video games will change your child’s relationship with firearms – the “weapon effect” is real – so think carefully about what video and media your children use. Common Sense Media is a great site to help you sort out your choices.

Guns And Violent Media – A Toxic Mix With An Available Antidote. <— read this, it’s amazing. Basically the gist: violent media changes what children think of and may do with firearms and firearm safe storage reduces firearm suicide and accidental shootings by 75%. Seventy-five percent reduction of suicide deaths and accidents from firearms just with storage. Talk about it, do it.

As individuals we obviously can’t prevent mass shootings by what we do in our homes today, but we can communicate openly and honestly in age-appropriate ways with our children, we can build a safer culture with our firearms in America, we can vote, and we can remind children all of the things we do to increase safety in their lives. We can make sure that those around us know how much we want to keep firearms out of children’s hands, too. This will help. Read full post »

10 Things To Know About 2017-2018 Flu Shots


The flu season is soon to be upon us and I hate to be so prescriptive but when it comes to influenza I feel like I have to be. I immunize my entire family and I think you should, too.

Hard to believe, but with our children going back to school and swapping snot around the classroom, it’s time to get fall flu immunizations on your radar. Last year during the 2016-17 season, more than 100 U.S. children died of the flu (influenza), and thousands more were hospitalized for severe illness or complications from the virus. Historically, more than 80% of children who died of influenza were not vaccinated. The flu shot is the best way to teach your own immune system to fight back if exposed to the virus. The flu vaccine “recipe” was changed this year (one different A strain compared with last year’s vaccine) to accommodate for predicted viral strains that will likely come and circulate around our neighborhoods.

The recommendations this year are the same as last year. Every child over 6 months of age should be immunized.

10 Things To Know About Flu Shots:

Here’s what you need to know based on my experience as a pediatrician, The Centers for Disease Control and American Academy of Pediatrics policies:
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Tips And Facts For Families On The Solar Eclipse

I know, everyone is writing about the eclipse. I’ve got just a few messages. One is, this is gonna be cool. Two, the caution messages are real. The cool part is because when our world goes a little dark mid-day next week it will be fairly startling. Even the animals are expected to change up how they behave. And the cautionary messages just make sense. Our eyes and our vision are clearly worth protecting ferociously. Damage from the eclipse can be permanent so taking a few steps to understand how and why just makes sense. And for framing this whole thing up in life? Thank goodness many of us have children in our midst. Their enthusiasm about how BIG this event is can help scale how exciting it is when the sun disappears in the middle of the day. Children harbor amazing perspective of what matters. Monday is a great day to stop reading the news and stare up into the sky (carefully). Thank goodness.

Quick Summary Of The Total Solar Eclipse

On Monday, August 21, 2017, all of North America will be treated to at least a partial view of an eclipse of the sun. Anyone within the path of totality can see one of nature’s most awe inspiring sights (as I’m told) – a total solar eclipse, which has not happened in 99 years. This path, where the moon, the sun and the Earth all line up such that the moon completely blocks out the sun will stretch from Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. The New York Times created the above video that captures the science and awe of this event. Even NASA created a website to provide a guide to viewers. Out West, people are talking of little else and Slate is reporting that Oregon is expecting 1 million tourists view the eclipse. People are changing up their weeks to view this. Two little girls from Seattle are getting real – they’re launching a weather balloon into space, in partnership with NASA, with live GPS tracking (and an Amelia Earhart LEGO) and some live video coverage links, too. I mean, it’s a big deal.

Can The Eclipse Hurt My Eyes?

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New Breast Pump Cleaning Guidelines From CDC

Every tool can carry risk when not used properly. The story about breast pumps and infection risk in the media recently is no exception. Attention all breast feeding & pumping mamas out there (and all the lovely people who support moms who pump milk): The Centers For Disease Control (CDC) has issued new guidelines for properly cleaning your breast pump & parts. The new recommendations come in the wake of a devastating story of a premature baby girl who showed signs of sepsis (bloodstream infection) at age 21 days due to an unusual bacterial infection. She developed spastic cerebral palsy, developmental delays and later passed away. This case is an outlier, for sure, but did prompt learning that the CDC felt the public should know.

After a full investigation, the CDC traced the infection source back to the breast pump and parts. The way the breast pump equipment was cared for may have allowed bacteria to grow. The CDC reported that the girl’s mother typically soaked the collection kit from her personal breast pump in soapy water in a wash basin for ≤5 hours without scrubbing or sanitizing. She then rinsed, air-dried, and stored the kit in a plastic zip-top bag until the next use. It’s possible how she cared for the pump allowed for bacteria to grow and be transferred to the baby. Because the baby was young and born prematurely, the baby was at greater risk for infection that most full-term older infants.

In response to the investigation, we reviewed existing resources for women about how to pump breast milk safely, but found little guidance that was detailed and based on the best available science,” Dr. Anna Bowen, a CDC medical officer, told Parents. “As a result, CDC developed its own guidance.”

New CDC Breast Pump Cleaning Guidelines:

  • Clean your pump parts after every use. Don’t skip a single feeding. I know it’s yet another step in the long process of breastfeeding and pumping, but it’s crucial. Annoying add but the recommendations are based in experts evaluating risks.
  • Wash your hands before touching your pump parts or pumped milk.
  • Key: keep a separate wash basin for the parts, the CDC doesn’t recommend you use the kitchen sink to clean pump supplies as the sink may house germs and bacteria from other food prep.
  • Have a dedicated cleaning brush for your pump and parts. Clean that brush every few days. Don’t re-use the sponge you use to scrub food off your plates and dishes.
  • Use running water and soap to clean breast pump parts that come in contact with breast milk.
  • Then let each piece and part air dry.
  • For extra cleanliness you can boil or steam the parts to sanitize in either a microwavable steamer or use the sanitize cycle in the dishwasher (HOT water). You can use the sanitizing bags that you use in the microwave or you can bring a pot of water to a boil and boil parts in the bubbling water for 5 minutes.

Bottom Line: this news isn’t meant to scare or drive moms away from breastfeeding and pumping. We know the many benefits of breastfeeding for both mom and baby (see below). This is just a reminder to be diligent when cleaning and sanitizing your breast pump. Read full post »