Seattle Mama Doc

Mama Doc Cliff Notes? Immunizations, Organic Milk, Formula & Swimming

Take a peek at this KCTS video interview for a recap on the science and rationale behind the most recent blog posts. My condensed (well, kind of) thoughts about a few recent studies, an AAP statement, and the news. It’s a little like Cliff Notes for the blog. But you don’t even have to turn any pages…

Links to studies discussed:
Study on immunization and neuropsychological outcome
Study on pesticide exposure

Reciprocity

Reciprocity. It happens in clinic sometimes, genuinely and lovingly. Someone says something in a way that gives me far more than I can dish out in a 20 minute clinic visit. It’s things like this, on top of genuinely getting to know my patients and their families, that keep me going back in each week. To steal a phrase from a friend, I’m really “happy to help & thrilled to be here.”

Really and truly. I’m not a PollyAnna; there certainly are bad days when I want to go home and snuggle with my boys, turn off the computer, and slow down. But really the general pulse of my life is that I’m thrilled to be here working, sharing, learning, and giving.

Primary care is fraught with difficulties. There is paperwork (read: piles), tedious e-mails, phone messages to return, lab values to review, refills to sign, new protocols to incorporate. This all sandwiched in between clinic visits with sick children and worried families. Emails and Twitter feed wedged between heart disease and plantar warts. It is complicated to manage this and busier that I ever imagined it would be. But it is still really good.

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To Cry It Out or Not To Cry It Out…

Sleep. We’d all love a little. Especially once we have children.
How have you, did you, or will you help your baby (and you!) sleep through the night?

Everyone has an opinion. Really, one opinion is rarely better than another. It’s one of those beautiful parenting truths where often, we’re all a little “right.”

Watch this segment from KCTS with insights from me and from sleep expert, Elizabeth Pantley.

Guest Blog: “Image Gently” 5 Things You Can Do

Here’s The Husband. There is no ghost-writing, I promise. I’ve kept my hands tied behind my back for the past few days.

The Husband is a pediatric radiologist. He works at Children’s. He’s passionate about reducing the amount of radiation a child receives when they have any imaging. In the medical world, “imaging” includes x-rays, CT scans (“cat” scans), bone scans, MRI studies, ultrasound, and procedures like “swallow studies” and VCUGs. He’s real smart and has taught me why to reduce the number of x-rays and CT scans I obtain in my own clinic.

Our tale began when we met the first day of medical school. I went up to the physician lecturer and made a comment after a lecture on gun violence. Jonathan stood right behind me. He said, “Ditto to everything she said.”  I don’t think he’s ever said ditto again. Darn.

Read his guest post. You’ll learn ways to reduce radiation exposure for your children. I say, “Ditto to everything he said.”

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Little Morsel: Go West

I’m going to share little morsels I read. This is morsel #1. I read this article while on vacation a week ago. I loved it. Only the abstract is available online today but if you feel you can pick up a New Yorker, do. If the full article becomes available online, I’ll redirect the link.

Although it doesn’t relate to pediatric health, it relates to telling stories. Which is what I do here.

Read Peter Hessler’s “Go West,” if you can. It’s not too long (like most in The New Yorker) and it’s chewy. I nibbled on the words and swallowed the images he creates.

Think running a marathon, learning the pronunciation of the state of Wyoming, and moving to Colorado. Think about Americans as storytellers. Think about moving back to the United States.

I think, next time I move, I want to hire the company he used in China.

Maybe you don’t even have to go on vacation to read it. How about during nap time?