Seattle Mama Doc

See Spot Run? Anterior Fontanelle, Part 2

seespotThe soft spot feels like an epicenter in O’s landscape. As every new parent gets to know their baby, the soft spot is just one of those places and spaces we come to know that makes our baby unique. I know O’s little spot is about to go away. Just another thing for me to cry about at the two-year birthday party.

I took a phone call from the husband recently who is a pediatric radiologist and who was reading a head CT scan, inquiring when I thought the soft spot closed in infants, exactly. He knows a lot more anatomy, physiology and imaging of the skull than I do, but he had a common question: just when does it close? Like so many things in medicine, I don’t think it’s entirely clear. There is no perfect answer.  The short answer is around 1-2 year of life. But like so many things, the range of normal is expansive. Read full post »

161 Years Later

Elizabeth Blackwell, MDToday while I was waiting for an elevator in downtown Seattle, a man whisked in front of me and another women to get in the elevator.  The woman had on a fancy coat and red, powdery lipstick. She stopped me as I was getting in and said, “Oh, it’s going down.” I stopped and waited and thanked her for alerting me to getting on the wrong elevator. I liked her. It didn’t really faze me that the man had pushed ahead of us a bit, but he had. The woman looked over at me and said, “what a man, can’t even wait for a woman to get on.”

I said, “well, chivalry really is dead.”  As if to state the obvious but also assert the okay-ness I had with it all. Then I said (maybe over-stepping my boundary with this stranger), “funny thing is, yesterday was January 11th and that marked the day that the first woman in the United States was awarded her MD.  And that was over 150 years ago.  So, if I lose the chivalry over those years and gain the opportunity to practice medicine as easily as I do, it seems a pretty good trade off.”

The woman just kind of looked at me, smiled, almost laughed a bit, and then stepped forward as the elevator re-opened. When we got in and headed up she said, “well, at least he’s not on our elevator.” Read full post »

Verbatim: The Wife

One little thing that really gets under my skin if you must know is the title, “The Wife.” When I hear it, it rings through me, moving and shifting my electrons in just the wrong way.

I’m sure most of you wives or mothers out there on planet earth don’t really mind it. But I do.

Here is how I often hear it. Let me set the scene:
Exam room, child center stage, father stage left.  Meaning no harm (or disrespect) the dad says, “Oh, and the wife wanted me to ask you about this rash.”

I remain calm, usually leaking no erratic response, remark, or expression. This is my issue, I’m sure. But the internal alarm goes off.  Just something about that woman being distilled to “the wife.”

“My wife wanted me to ask you about this rash.”               No alarm.
“His mother wanted me to ask you about this rash.”          No alarm.

But,“The wife wanted me to ask you about this rash.”     Alarm-tastic.

With permission, I’m going to refer to my partner and husband, father of my children, as The Husband. Just to even the field. For today and maybe tomorrow, too. He’s ok with it; I’ve cleared this.
Thank you, husband, The Husband.

Science Of The Soft Spot: The Anterior Fontanelle, Part 1

The soft spot on the top of my baby’s head is one of my favorite places to run my hand.  I don’t know why exactly but it seems one of those places on him that truly represents his baby-hood.  One way I know that his infancy isn’t quite gone and my baby days aren’t over yet. O recently turned a year (so, yes, technically he’s no infant) and I have felt his baby-ness slipping through my fingers. I keep saying that to my patients when they ask about him. I am hoping it will somehow prolong this period and I won’t have to wake up and find myself with two grown boys in the house.

The emotional yo-yo between pure excitement about them growing up, with the simultaneous dread of losing these baby moments, remains real and palpable. The essence of parenthood I suppose is that stew of anxiety-thrill-dread-adoration-excitement as the days unfold and you hope for new things for your little baby while lamenting the loss of precious moments of who your baby is on a Monday in January.  So the soft spot is a good place to go to calm my inner anxiety about my toddlers walking out the door to college.

Lots of new parents ask me about caring for the soft spot. As the first year unfolds, it is the soft spot (aka “fontanelle”) in the front/top portion of a baby’s head that parents ask about, the anterior fontanelle. I think we all conjure up crazy worries about an errant flying pencil landing in it. Read full post »

2 Is The New 1: Rear-Facing Car Seats Until At Least Age 2

rear-facing until age 2**The American Academy of Pediatrics has updated their recommendations since this blog published in 2010. Children should ride in rear-facing car seats until they reach the height or weight limit provided by the car seat manufacturer. This is likely well past age 2. To view the new guidelines and data, click here.**

2 is the new1.

This is kind of like, “brown is the new black.” But different and more important.

Two is the new one. When you’re a toddler. And when you’re at least 20 pounds.

And you’re in the car.

Let me explain. This is important for a number of reasons. One, not a lot of people (even pediatricians) know this yet because new data hasn’t been incorporated into policy statements. And two, it could save lives. Three and four: it could save lives.

Listen up and tell your friends. Scream from the rooftops. Read full post »